KIDS FIRST! has endorsed 1894 total Video titles

Below are up to 26 of them

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This title is in the KIDS FIRST! Film Festival - it may not be a regular, endorsed title
SO MUCH TO LIVE FOR TODAY
SO MUCH TO LIVE FOR TODAY - ALAN CHRIEST / POWERSPASH PROJECT
Series: SHORT, AGES 2-18
Description - Music Video celebrating life.
KIDS FIRST!® Adult Jurors say - This is my new happy video. I watched it twice, then shared it with one of our other jurors who was having a difficult day. It made her smile as much as it did me. A short music video that celebrates life through a collection of images of fun activities by kids, young and old. This fast paced montage shows quick clips of images of people doing fun and cool things, from rollercoasters, to diving into a pool, to rafting rapids, blowing out candles on a birthday cake, dancing, standing on a mountaintop, parachuting, exercising with your child, running, winning a race, playing basketball, a cat drinking water, a child eating ice cream, hula hooping, marching in the band, playing tennis, juggling, making a snow angel, and oh... so much more. The background music is perfect - upbeat and fast paced. If you didn't feel so happy before you watched this, you certainly will burst out into a smile or more after you do. Quick edits work well for this short film. Kudos to filmmaker Alan J. Chriest for another fun and uplifting short film. The film's message is that there are lots of reasons to smile, just take a look at some. I give So Much To Live For Today 4 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 2 to 18, plus adults. By Julie S., KIDS FIRST!
KIDS FIRST!® Kid Jurors say - This is my new happy video. I watched it twice, then shared it with one of our other jurors who was having a difficult day. It made her smile as much as it did me. A short music video that celebrates life through a collection of images of fun activities by kids, young and old. This fast paced montage shows quick clips of images of people doing fun and cool things, from rollercoasters, to diving into a pool, to rafting rapids, blowing out candles on a birthday cake, dancing, standing on a mountaintop, parachuting, exercising with your child, running, winning a race, playing basketball, a cat drinking water, a child eating ice cream, hula hooping, marching in the band, playing tennis, juggling, making a snow angel, and oh... so much more. The background music is perfect - upbeat and fast paced. If you didn't feel so happy before you watched this, you certainly will burst out into a smile or more after you do. Quick edits work well for this short film. Kudos to filmmaker Alan J. Chriest for another fun and uplifting short film. The film's message is that there are lots of reasons to smile, just take a look at some. I give So Much To Live For Today 4 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 2 to 18, plus adults. By Julie S., KIDS FIRST!
Runtime: 3 minutes Juror Recommended Age: 2-18 Suggested Retail Price: $ Media: VIDEO


This title is in the KIDS FIRST! Film Festival - it may not be a regular, endorsed title
MELODY
MELODY - LAUREN E. ROMAN
Series: STUDENT ANIMATED SHORT, AGES 8-12
Description - A father, out of loneliness, sings his daughter into existence, but as she grows older, her curiosity leads her to a dangerous new voice.
KIDS FIRST!® Adult Jurors say - Beautifully executed short animation college student film that touches your heart and reminds you of the connectedness between parents and their children. A father, out of loneliness, sings his daughter into existence, but as she grows older, her curiosity leads her to a dangerous new voice. This animated college student short takes a look at the loneliness of a young man who invents his own daughter by singing her into existence. The animation is well done; the background music is subtle and appropriate. I love the images of the man and his baby girl. We watch her growing up and the interaction with her dad changes as she wants to explore a wider world. The dad longs for her to remain the infant in arms that she once was, but she is discovering her new voice and new self. The film's message is about creating our own reality and learning to grow and change with it. I give Melody 4.5 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 8 to 18, plus adults. By Julie S., KIDS FIRST!
KIDS FIRST!® Kid Jurors say - Beautifully executed short animation college student film that touches your heart and reminds you of the connectedness between parents and their children. A father, out of loneliness, sings his daughter into existence, but as she grows older, her curiosity leads her to a dangerous new voice. This animated college student short takes a look at the loneliness of a young man who invents his own daughter by singing her into existence. The animation is well done; the background music is subtle and appropriate. I love the images of the man and his baby girl. We watch her growing up and the interaction with her dad changes as she wants to explore a wider world. The dad longs for her to remain the infant in arms that she once was, but she is discovering her new voice and new self. The film's message is about creating our own reality and learning to grow and change with it. I give Melody 4.5 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 8 to 18, plus adults. By Julie S., KIDS FIRST!
Runtime: 5 minutes Juror Recommended Age: 8-12 Suggested Retail Price: $ Media: VIDEO


This title is in the KIDS FIRST! Film Festival - it may not be a regular, endorsed title
SILKWORM
SILKWORM - AMIR HONARMAND
Series: FOREIGN SHORT, AGES 12-16
Description - A used smart phone sends a boy in rural Iran on an unexpected journey of reconnecting an estranged couple.
KIDS FIRST!® Adult Jurors say - This short dramatic film from Iran touches a universal topic of how smart phones have infiltrated daily life of people worldwide and how young people of meager means covet them.

A used smart phone sends a boy, Amin, in rural Iran on an unexpected journey of reconnecting an estranged couple.

Well-constructed, with good camera work, audio and casting. This very contemporary storyline is one that could take place pretty much anywhere in the world today, as it shows how smart phones have affected people globally. This film makes me very sad, by how the young boy, Amin, is lied to by an older man when he gifts him with a smart phone. Amin slowly begins to figure out that the phone was stolen, but he loves his phone and is obsessed with taking pictures with it. He begins to do his math homework on his phone until a text message appears that solidifies his suspicion about the phone's origin. Amin finally confronts his friend about the phone's origin and ends up in a tricky situation as he tries to return the phone at last. The cinematography is quite beautiful, especially the landscape shots. Mohammad Amin Mohammadi, who plays Amin, steals the show. He plays the young boy in a very understated, but strong way. The dialogue is in Persian with English subtitles, which are not always accurately spelled.

The film's message is that sometimes a gift isn't a gift, especially when you don't know its origins. I give Silkworm 3.5 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 12 to 18, plus adults. It would play well at a teen/young adult film festival and could be a great discussion starter. By Julie S., KIDS FIRST!
KIDS FIRST!® Kid Jurors say - This short dramatic film from Iran touches a universal topic of how smart phones have infiltrated daily life of people worldwide and how young people of meager means covet them.

A used smart phone sends a boy, Amin, in rural Iran on an unexpected journey of reconnecting an estranged couple.

Well-constructed, with good camera work, audio and casting. This very contemporary storyline is one that could take place pretty much anywhere in the world today, as it shows how smart phones have affected people globally. This film makes me very sad, by how the young boy, Amin, is lied to by an older man when he gifts him with a smart phone. Amin slowly begins to figure out that the phone was stolen, but he loves his phone and is obsessed with taking pictures with it. He begins to do his math homework on his phone until a text message appears that solidifies his suspicion about the phone's origin. Amin finally confronts his friend about the phone's origin and ends up in a tricky situation as he tries to return the phone at last. The cinematography is quite beautiful, especially the landscape shots. Mohammad Amin Mohammadi, who plays Amin, steals the show. He plays the young boy in a very understated, but strong way. The dialogue is in Persian with English subtitles, which are not always accurately spelled.

The film's message is that sometimes a gift isn't a gift, especially when you don't know its origins. I give Silkworm 3.5 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 12 to 18, plus adults. It would play well at a teen/young adult film festival and could be a great discussion starter. By Julie S., KIDS FIRST!
Runtime: 30 minutes Juror Recommended Age: 12-18 Suggested Retail Price: $ Media: VIDEO



This title is in the KIDS FIRST! Film Festival - it may not be a regular, endorsed title
FITTING IN
FITTING IN - MARK LESCHINSKY
Series: STUDENT SHORT, AGES 12 - 18
Description - "Fitting In" is a symbolic social-impact film that draws a parallel between fitting into shoes and fitting into society, and, in doing so, it inspires us to embrace our unique personalities.
KIDS FIRST!® Adult Jurors say - Beautifully shot, this student film delivers a visual message in a unique way. Fitting In is a symbolic social-impact film that draws a parallel between fitting into shoes and fitting into society, and, in doing so, it inspires us to embrace our unique personalities. I love the visuals in this short film with the shots of strikingly colorful shoes and the train. The narrator Barbara Leschinsky delivers her message in a calm and deliberate way. This high school student made film addresses how each of us is unique and our efforts to try to fit in are sometimes challenging. The background music is non-intrusive and helps drive a constant pace in the film. This would make a great interstitial for a KIDS FIRST! Film Festival and be a great discussion starter. The film's message is about the challenging of trying to fit in. I give Fitting In 3.5 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 12 to 18, plus adults. By Julie S., KIDS FIRST!
KIDS FIRST!® Kid Jurors say - Beautifully shot, this student film delivers a visual message in a unique way. Fitting In is a symbolic social-impact film that draws a parallel between fitting into shoes and fitting into society, and, in doing so, it inspires us to embrace our unique personalities. I love the visuals in this short film with the shots of strikingly colorful shoes and the train. The narrator Barbara Leschinsky delivers her message in a calm and deliberate way. This high school student made film addresses how each of us is unique and our efforts to try to fit in are sometimes challenging. The background music is non-intrusive and helps drive a constant pace in the film. This would make a great interstitial for a KIDS FIRST! Film Festival and be a great discussion starter. The film's message is about the challenging of trying to fit in. I give Fitting In 3.5 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 12 to 18, plus adults. By Julie S., KIDS FIRST!
Runtime: 4 minutes Juror Recommended Age: 12-18 Suggested Retail Price: $ Media: VIDEO


This title is in the KIDS FIRST! Film Festival - it may not be a regular, endorsed title
BLOOD SISTERS
BLOOD SISTERS - ANASTACIA PUERTAS
Series: STUDENT SHORT, AGES 12 - 18
Description - Three pre-teen girls Daphne, Ivy, and Hanna bond at summer camp through helping Daphne figure out how to deal with her first period.
KIDS FIRST!® Adult Jurors say - The short film, Blood Sisters, is definitely relatable for young women. Friends are very supportive and this story is told in a tasteful way.

The storyline follows three pre-teen girls, Daphne, Ivy, and Hanna, who bond at summer camp through helping Daphne figure out how to deal with her first period. The film is very tasteful for such an awkward but normal subject. I really like how supportive and understanding the girls are towards each other. These are embarrassing moments for any girl and this story is told in a gentle and kind way. The camerawork is great with lots of close-ups of the girls discussing Daphne's situation, which makes the viewer feel part of the group in an intimate and friendly way. The girls are wearing camp gear which suits the storyline and time period. The film takes place inside the camp cabins and that perfectly works. There is some animation in a few scenes which adds to the story. My favorite example is the demonization of the tampon. The characters, Daphne (Soleil Adele), Ivy (Helena Goodrich) and Hanna (Jyla Price) all are played with humor and kindness; there is a great deal of realism in the girls' awkwardness and the situation. Their friendship is very believable and I enjoyed their warmth and humor. Director and Writer Anastacia Puertas brings a sense of nostalgia, humor and kindness to this awkward part of growing up. My favorite part is when Ivy shares her "Welcome to the Club" box that her mom prepared for just such an occasion. She has older sisters so she is not embarrassed about the subject and that box adds humor to the situation.

The film's message is that awkward moments are part of life and growing up. Supportive friends can make all the difference in an awkward situation. I give Blood Sisters 4 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 12 to 18, plus adults. By Selene W., KIDS FIRST!
KIDS FIRST!® Kid Jurors say - The short film, Blood Sisters, is definitely relatable for young women. Friends are very supportive and this story is told in a tasteful way.

The storyline follows three pre-teen girls, Daphne, Ivy, and Hanna, who bond at summer camp through helping Daphne figure out how to deal with her first period. The film is very tasteful for such an awkward but normal subject. I really like how supportive and understanding the girls are towards each other. These are embarrassing moments for any girl and this story is told in a gentle and kind way. The camerawork is great with lots of close-ups of the girls discussing Daphne's situation, which makes the viewer feel part of the group in an intimate and friendly way. The girls are wearing camp gear which suits the storyline and time period. The film takes place inside the camp cabins and that perfectly works. There is some animation in a few scenes which adds to the story. My favorite example is the demonization of the tampon. The characters, Daphne (Soleil Adele), Ivy (Helena Goodrich) and Hanna (Jyla Price) all are played with humor and kindness; there is a great deal of realism in the girls' awkwardness and the situation. Their friendship is very believable and I enjoyed their warmth and humor. Director and Writer Anastacia Puertas brings a sense of nostalgia, humor and kindness to this awkward part of growing up. My favorite part is when Ivy shares her "Welcome to the Club" box that her mom prepared for just such an occasion. She has older sisters so she is not embarrassed about the subject and that box adds humor to the situation.

The film's message is that awkward moments are part of life and growing up. Supportive friends can make all the difference in an awkward situation. I give Blood Sisters 4 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 12 to 18, plus adults. By Selene W., KIDS FIRST!
Runtime: 7 minutes Juror Recommended Age: 12-18 Suggested Retail Price: $ Media: VIDEO



This title is in the KIDS FIRST! Film Festival - it may not be a regular, endorsed title
MY SUPERPOWER
MY SUPERPOWER - MAXWELL WILLIAM ANDREWS
Series: FOREIGN SHORT, AGES 2-12
Description - In his search for his superpower, nine year old Maxwell discovers that his words have the power to help and to harm.
KIDS FIRST!® Adult Jurors say - My Superpower is great, simply because we are shown a different approach to superpowers than the norm we are used to seeing. My Superpower is a short film that showcases a journey of a nine-year-old in search of his superpower, only to discover that his words have the power to help or to harm.

The New Zealand based writer, director, producer and star of this film is nine years old himself and deserves credit for an exceptionally well made film. The storyline is simple and appropriate for young ones seeking to discover themselves. The cinematography is simple and easy, which gives it the sense of discovery. I particularly love his use of close-ups, stop motion, shadows and a bit of claymation. Also, the animated words are a cool addition. I should add that some shots are out of focus and some are a bit shaky, but it doesn't detract from the overall film. The protagonist, Maxwell William, showcases great enthusiasm for having a natural superpower. I was drawn to it from the beginning simply because we are left to our imagination to determine what might be the power that Maxwell is excited about. If you are looking for a lovely film made by an elementary age student, with a great message, look no further, you have found it here!

The message is that a superpower doesn't have to be what we only see in movies but can be something that helps people. I give My Superpower 3.5 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 2 to 12. Reviewed by Eunnet C., KIDS FIRST!
KIDS FIRST!® Kid Jurors say - My Superpower is great, simply because we are shown a different approach to superpowers than the norm we are used to seeing. My Superpower is a short film that showcases a journey of a nine-year-old in search of his superpower, only to discover that his words have the power to help or to harm.

The New Zealand based writer, director, producer and star of this film is nine years old himself and deserves credit for an exceptionally well made film. The storyline is simple and appropriate for young ones seeking to discover themselves. The cinematography is simple and easy, which gives it the sense of discovery. I particularly love his use of close-ups, stop motion, shadows and a bit of claymation. Also, the animated words are a cool addition. I should add that some shots are out of focus and some are a bit shaky, but it doesn't detract from the overall film. The protagonist, Maxwell William, showcases great enthusiasm for having a natural superpower. I was drawn to it from the beginning simply because we are left to our imagination to determine what might be the power that Maxwell is excited about. If you are looking for a lovely film made by an elementary age student, with a great message, look no further, you have found it here!

The message is that a superpower doesn't have to be what we only see in movies but can be something that helps people. I give My Superpower 3.5 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 2 to 12. Reviewed by Eunnet C., KIDS FIRST!
Runtime: 5 minutes Juror Recommended Age: 2-12 Suggested Retail Price: $ Media: VIDEO



This title is in the KIDS FIRST! Film Festival - it may not be a regular, endorsed title
ROBOTS DON'T TELL JOKES
ROBOTS DON'T TELL JOKES - KELLI CALDWELL
Series: ANIMATED SHORT, AGES 2-18
Description - Robot thinks he has a wonderful joke, so he keeps trying to tell it, but none of the other robots ever laugh. They tell him "robots don't tell jokes..." Will Robot give up on his awesome joke or will he find his tribe? Stop-motion using mainly wood scraps and metal pieces.
KIDS FIRST!® Adult Jurors say - What a wonderful film! Fun, spunky, great music and great message. This is exactly what fits into a KIDS FIRST! Film Festival. Robot thinks he has a wonderful joke, so he keeps trying to tell it, but none of the other robots ever laugh. They tell him "robots don't tell jokes." Will Robot give up on his awesome joke or will he find his tribe?

Love this short film, from the music to the intent. And, the animation is adorable. It gives Robots personalities and human qualities, which endears them to us. The visuals are superb - plus bright and colorful. The stop-motion animation makes use of various stuff from wood scraps and metal pieces to children's blocks and clacking teeth. The film's message is a protest against the automation and dehumanization of everything as it anthropomorphizes "robots." I give Robots Don't Tell Jokes 5 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 2 to 18, plus adults. By Julie S., KIDS FIRST!
KIDS FIRST!® Kid Jurors say - What a wonderful film! Fun, spunky, great music and great message. This is exactly what fits into a KIDS FIRST! Film Festival. Robot thinks he has a wonderful joke, so he keeps trying to tell it, but none of the other robots ever laugh. They tell him "robots don't tell jokes." Will Robot give up on his awesome joke or will he find his tribe?

Love this short film, from the music to the intent. And, the animation is adorable. It gives Robots personalities and human qualities, which endears them to us. The visuals are superb - plus bright and colorful. The stop-motion animation makes use of various stuff from wood scraps and metal pieces to children's blocks and clacking teeth. The film's message is a protest against the automation and dehumanization of everything as it anthropomorphizes "robots." I give Robots Don't Tell Jokes 5 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 2 to 18, plus adults. By Julie S., KIDS FIRST!
Runtime: 3 minutes Juror Recommended Age: 2-18 Suggested Retail Price: $ Media: VIDEO



This title is in the KIDS FIRST! Film Festival - it may not be a regular, endorsed title
GENERATIONAL TRAUMA
GENERATIONAL TRAUMA - ALAN CHRIEST / POWERSPASH PROJECT
Series: DOCUMENTARY SHORT, AGES 12-18
Description - We may inherit many things from our family such as heirlooms and how we look, and sometimes we may inherit trauma.
KIDS FIRST!® Adult Jurors say - Intrigued would be one of the words I can use to describe how fascinated I was with the documentary, Generational Trauma. I like how everything is arranged in an educational way that allows you to easily follow along. Generational Trauma is a short film focusing on generational trauma - where it comes from and how someone can address it. The subject of the film is quite interesting, but it tends to be more educational than entertaining. I like the structure of the film. The story develops nicely and progresses to a tender note at the very end. The visuals are good; it is more of a slideshow with some video images and some animation. I love the music; it is quite extravagant and helps enhance the seriousness of the topic. Generational Trauma is narrated by Alan J. Chriest, who is also the producer and director. He makes a perfect narrator because he understands the seriousness of the effects of trauma on many people. The message of the film is that people should be handled gently, because you are never aware of what they might be going through. I give Generational Trauma 4.0 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 12 to 18, plus adults. It educates people about trauma. By Eunnet C., KIDS FIRST!
KIDS FIRST!® Kid Jurors say - Intrigued would be one of the words I can use to describe how fascinated I was with the documentary, Generational Trauma. I like how everything is arranged in an educational way that allows you to easily follow along. Generational Trauma is a short film focusing on generational trauma - where it comes from and how someone can address it. The subject of the film is quite interesting, but it tends to be more educational than entertaining. I like the structure of the film. The story develops nicely and progresses to a tender note at the very end. The visuals are good; it is more of a slideshow with some video images and some animation. I love the music; it is quite extravagant and helps enhance the seriousness of the topic. Generational Trauma is narrated by Alan J. Chriest, who is also the producer and director. He makes a perfect narrator because he understands the seriousness of the effects of trauma on many people. The message of the film is that people should be handled gently, because you are never aware of what they might be going through. I give Generational Trauma 4.0 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 12 to 18, plus adults. It educates people about trauma. By Eunnet C., KIDS FIRST!
Runtime: 14 minutes Juror Recommended Age: 12-18 Suggested Retail Price: $ Media: VIDEO


This title is in the KIDS FIRST! Film Festival - it may not be a regular, endorsed title
STORY OF THE OPERA, THE
STORY OF THE OPERA, THE - YUE ZHANG
Series: FOREIGN SHORT, AGES 8-18
Description - In order to compile a children's recitation book of ancient poems, Ms.Qingmu goes to visit Mr. Yao in Zhufeng Village. There, Ms. Qingmu meets a girl named Douya who has talent as an opera singer and she invites her to come to the city to learn. Two singers, Qianqian and Zixuan are jealous of Douya and they bully her. In order to beat Douya at the Elite Youth Art Competition, Nana deliberately makes Douya eat fruit shake, which makes her hoarse. When the results are released, Nana doesn't win; all the students talk about Nana, but Douya helps her out. Ms. Qingmu has no money to continue running the school and Douya's mother loses her job. Just as they are going to return to the village, Douya receives an admission letter from the Opera School.
KIDS FIRST!® Adult Jurors say - The Story of the Opera offers a great window into Chinese culture on so many levels. The story unfolds slowly to reveal life in the countryside of China and how Chinese teachers and students conduct themselves. I like the characterization of the protagonist and the antagonist. I enjoyed the chanting and poems and, despite the bad behavior from jealous girls (part of the character arc) and some of the teacher's misguided techniques of teaching, the film is very good! This film is in Mandarin Chinese with English subtitles.

The storyline follows a teacher and her students who are learning poems, intonations and songs from the Chinese opera. Competition is encouraged and therefore inspires a bit of jealousy among students, leading to some bullying and hurt feelings. The story is very gentle by American bullying standards and viewers will be sympathetic to all of the characters!

One thing that I find a little disturbing (as a teacher myself) is the way that the teacher always points out who was 'the best' singer. This aggravates jealousy, which in turn leads to bad behavior by some of the less advanced children. The cinematography shows the beautiful landscapes of the Chinese countryside, and close-ups of the faces of all of the characters. It is undramatic, but a supportive part of the production. The costumes are in alignment with the genre of the film. Kids wear uniforms and opera costumes while the teacher is beautifully clad in flowing gowns appropriate for a Chinese artist. The sets suit the story, both indoors and outdoors. The classroom is a bit different than American classes today, and I enjoyed looking at how they are different. The background music is mostly Western classical music underscores. The source music is Chinese opera and poetry, using the Arhu (2 stringed instrument) and gongs. The sound mix is not great as the underscore music sometimes fades out as the scene ends, rather than threading the images together. The music enhances the film's story. I was unable to read the actors names in the credits as they are written with Chinese calligraphy, but the star character is the teacher, Ms. Qingmu who is a kind and dedicated supporter of the arts. Douya is a farm-girl who comes to the city to study opera and excels far beyond her regional status. All of the children show their emotions and move the story forward. The production is cohesive and beautifully portrayed due to contributors at all levels. My favorite part of the film is when the children are singing or reciting poems to each other. Children singing is the sweetest sound on earth, regardless of the language and whether one understands what is being said.

The film's message is that kindness is a more powerful value than even talent! Kindness heals all wounds. I give The Story of the Opera 4.5 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 8 to 18, plus adults Cross-cultural education is always a plus in film. The differences in this film vs. American films are rich, plus we learn about Chinese education and opera. By Nancy K., KIDS FIRST!
KIDS FIRST!® Kid Jurors say - The Story of the Opera offers a great window into Chinese culture on so many levels. The story unfolds slowly to reveal life in the countryside of China and how Chinese teachers and students conduct themselves. I like the characterization of the protagonist and the antagonist. I enjoyed the chanting and poems and, despite the bad behavior from jealous girls (part of the character arc) and some of the teacher's misguided techniques of teaching, the film is very good! This film is in Mandarin Chinese with English subtitles.

The storyline follows a teacher and her students who are learning poems, intonations and songs from the Chinese opera. Competition is encouraged and therefore inspires a bit of jealousy among students, leading to some bullying and hurt feelings. The story is very gentle by American bullying standards and viewers will be sympathetic to all of the characters!

One thing that I find a little disturbing (as a teacher myself) is the way that the teacher always points out who was 'the best' singer. This aggravates jealousy, which in turn leads to bad behavior by some of the less advanced children. The cinematography shows the beautiful landscapes of the Chinese countryside, and close-ups of the faces of all of the characters. It is undramatic, but a supportive part of the production. The costumes are in alignment with the genre of the film. Kids wear uniforms and opera costumes while the teacher is beautifully clad in flowing gowns appropriate for a Chinese artist. The sets suit the story, both indoors and outdoors. The classroom is a bit different than American classes today, and I enjoyed looking at how they are different. The background music is mostly Western classical music underscores. The source music is Chinese opera and poetry, using the Arhu (2 stringed instrument) and gongs. The sound mix is not great as the underscore music sometimes fades out as the scene ends, rather than threading the images together. The music enhances the film's story. I was unable to read the actors names in the credits as they are written with Chinese calligraphy, but the star character is the teacher, Ms. Qingmu who is a kind and dedicated supporter of the arts. Douya is a farm-girl who comes to the city to study opera and excels far beyond her regional status. All of the children show their emotions and move the story forward. The production is cohesive and beautifully portrayed due to contributors at all levels. My favorite part of the film is when the children are singing or reciting poems to each other. Children singing is the sweetest sound on earth, regardless of the language and whether one understands what is being said.

The film's message is that kindness is a more powerful value than even talent! Kindness heals all wounds. I give The Story of the Opera 4.5 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 8 to 18, plus adults Cross-cultural education is always a plus in film. The differences in this film vs. American films are rich, plus we learn about Chinese education and opera. By Nancy K., KIDS FIRST!
Runtime: 46 minutes Juror Recommended Age: 8-18 Suggested Retail Price: $ Media: VIDEO



This title is in the KIDS FIRST! Film Festival - it may not be a regular, endorsed title
GIULIA E IL CAPOPOSTO
GIULIA E IL CAPOPOSTO - ANTONIO MARIA CASTALDO
Series: FOREIGN SHORT, AGES 8-18
Description - Giulia e il Capoposto is a small fairy tale based on a true story. Giulia has recently lost her father and she wishes to communicate with him. She decides to buy a balloon to which she attaches a letter which, flying up into the sky, will reach her father. However, when the balloon begins to rise, something goes wrong. It is thanks to the intervention of the chief of the fire brigade that Giulia will be able to make her wish come true.
KIDS FIRST!® Adult Jurors say - Giulia E Il Capoposto is a sweet short film that I found heartwarming.

Giulia e il Capoposto, is based on a true story about a young girl who recently lost her father and she wishes to send something to her dad in Heaven, but it gets stuck in a tree. Thanks to the intervention of the fire chief, she is able to make her wish come true.

I love Giulia (Tal�a Savoldo) because she is so sweet and I love that she wants to "keep in touch" with her father even after he has passed. I also love the commander in guard (Andrea Comini), because he is nice enough to help Giulia with her letter. All the actors are really excellent and make use of gestures and facial expressions, which is important, since the majority of the film is silent. The camera work is quite good. I love the angles they use on Giulia's close-ups as they really catch her worried looks. I love the costumes as they capture the era the film takes place in. My favorite scene is when the commander in guard rescues the balloon and the note and gives it to Giulia; he shows so much kindness and care for her. I feel this film will definitely capture the audience's attention and will warm their hearts. The dialogue is in Italian with English subtitles.

The film's message is that when you want to achieve something, you should know that there will be other people around to help and support you, whether it is friends, family or even strangers. I give Giulia E Il Capoposto 5 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 8 to 18, plus adults. By Ari P., KIDS FIRST!
KIDS FIRST!® Kid Jurors say - Giulia E Il Capoposto is a sweet short film that I found heartwarming.

Giulia e il Capoposto, is based on a true story about a young girl who recently lost her father and she wishes to send something to her dad in Heaven, but it gets stuck in a tree. Thanks to the intervention of the fire chief, she is able to make her wish come true.

I love Giulia (Tal�a Savoldo) because she is so sweet and I love that she wants to "keep in touch" with her father even after he has passed. I also love the commander in guard (Andrea Comini), because he is nice enough to help Giulia with her letter. All the actors are really excellent and make use of gestures and facial expressions, which is important, since the majority of the film is silent. The camera work is quite good. I love the angles they use on Giulia's close-ups as they really catch her worried looks. I love the costumes as they capture the era the film takes place in. My favorite scene is when the commander in guard rescues the balloon and the note and gives it to Giulia; he shows so much kindness and care for her. I feel this film will definitely capture the audience's attention and will warm their hearts. The dialogue is in Italian with English subtitles.

The film's message is that when you want to achieve something, you should know that there will be other people around to help and support you, whether it is friends, family or even strangers. I give Giulia E Il Capoposto 5 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 8 to 18, plus adults. By Ari P., KIDS FIRST!
Runtime: 12 minutes Juror Recommended Age: 8-18 Suggested Retail Price: $ Media: VIDEO



This title is in the KIDS FIRST! Film Festival - it may not be a regular, endorsed title
#NANAROCKS
#NANAROCKS - LETICIA AGUDO
Series: FOREIGN SHORT, AGES 8-18
Description - A woman celebrates her 78th birthday with her two granddaughters. Rachel regales her with loud attention, gifts, and photos she posts online. Rosie quietly works away cleaning, cooking, and sorting Nana's meds. Rachel almost kills her diabetic Nana with a high-sugar cake and Rosie rushes to the rescue. Still, Nana seems to enjoy Rachel's visits most, taking Rosie's quiet nature for granted until Rosie falls ill. Rachel visits Nana and leaves her with no food, a shoddy cleaning job and a broken telly. Moved by seeing the last container of food prepared by Rosie, Nana embarks on an epic cross-country journey on her mobility scooter.
KIDS FIRST!® Adult Jurors say - This film provides an Interesting study in contrasts between two grandchildren who are visiting their grandmother. The eldest granddaughter regales her with loud attention, gifts and constantly posts photos online. Meanwhile, her younger sister quietly cleans, cooks and sorts grandma's meds. Nana enjoy the levity of the older and takes the younger's quiet nature for granted until she falls ill

Well produced - good camerawork and good audio -- fun background music. As the director points out, there are few coming-of-age films about older women. This is a fun comedy starring a 78-year-old woman who pursues her granddaughter on her mobility scooter and cane. I love her tenacity and love how both granddaughters connect with her in their own separate ways. I love how Nana goes to take care of Rosie even though it means climbing a mountain of stairs.

The film's message is that this is what it's like taking care of our older parents or grandparents. It's not always easy, but it's all worthwhile and, sometimes they have to take care of the younger ones. I give #NanaRocks 4 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 8 to 18, plus adults. By Julie S., KIDS FIRST!
KIDS FIRST!® Kid Jurors say - This film provides an Interesting study in contrasts between two grandchildren who are visiting their grandmother. The eldest granddaughter regales her with loud attention, gifts and constantly posts photos online. Meanwhile, her younger sister quietly cleans, cooks and sorts grandma's meds. Nana enjoy the levity of the older and takes the younger's quiet nature for granted until she falls ill

Well produced - good camerawork and good audio -- fun background music. As the director points out, there are few coming-of-age films about older women. This is a fun comedy starring a 78-year-old woman who pursues her granddaughter on her mobility scooter and cane. I love her tenacity and love how both granddaughters connect with her in their own separate ways. I love how Nana goes to take care of Rosie even though it means climbing a mountain of stairs.

The film's message is that this is what it's like taking care of our older parents or grandparents. It's not always easy, but it's all worthwhile and, sometimes they have to take care of the younger ones. I give #NanaRocks 4 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 8 to 18, plus adults. By Julie S., KIDS FIRST!
Runtime: 10 minutes Juror Recommended Age: 8-18 Suggested Retail Price: $ Media: VIDEO



This title is in the KIDS FIRST! Film Festival - it may not be a regular, endorsed title
MULBERRYHOOD
MULBERRYHOOD - PEDRO AUGUSTO ALMEIDA
Series: FOREIGN SHORT, AGES 8-12
Description - It's the summer of 2004. Three boys play ball in a parking lot. Two brothers interfere with the game. One ball.
KIDS FIRST!® Adult Jurors say - Mulberryhood offers a blast from the past as we are privy to watching a close knit group of young boys pursue their passion - soccer.

It's the summer of 2004. Three boys play ball in a parking lot. Two brothers interfere with the game. One ball. Well produced with great camera work, especially in terms of following the movement of the boys and the ball. Good audio recording also. The story takes place in the early 2000's showing the camaraderie of a group of young boys in a town in Portugal as their relationship is tested due to who owns the soccer ball. Filmmakers Pedro Augusto Almeida and Jorge Dias draw from their own real life experiences to bring us a "blast from the past" in this short film. The setting is authentic as we watch these boys move about throughout their neighborhood, seeking to pursue the game they love so well. Using non actors is a smart way to maintain its authenticity and it works well here. The ending speaks volumes for the kindness of the era.

The film gives us a glimpse into another time and another reality, emphasizing the type of friendships established decades ago. I give Mulberryhood 4.5 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 8 to 12, plus adults. By Julie S., KIDS FIRST
KIDS FIRST!® Kid Jurors say - Mulberryhood offers a blast from the past as we are privy to watching a close knit group of young boys pursue their passion - soccer.

It's the summer of 2004. Three boys play ball in a parking lot. Two brothers interfere with the game. One ball. Well produced with great camera work, especially in terms of following the movement of the boys and the ball. Good audio recording also. The story takes place in the early 2000's showing the camaraderie of a group of young boys in a town in Portugal as their relationship is tested due to who owns the soccer ball. Filmmakers Pedro Augusto Almeida and Jorge Dias draw from their own real life experiences to bring us a "blast from the past" in this short film. The setting is authentic as we watch these boys move about throughout their neighborhood, seeking to pursue the game they love so well. Using non actors is a smart way to maintain its authenticity and it works well here. The ending speaks volumes for the kindness of the era.

The film gives us a glimpse into another time and another reality, emphasizing the type of friendships established decades ago. I give Mulberryhood 4.5 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 8 to 12, plus adults. By Julie S., KIDS FIRST
Runtime: 14 minutes Juror Recommended Age: 8-12 Suggested Retail Price: $ Media: VIDEO



This title is in the KIDS FIRST! Film Festival - it may not be a regular, endorsed title
ATTRACTION
ATTRACTION - HUANSHUO WANG
Series: FOREIGN STUDENT SHORT, AGES 12-18
Description - A boy tries to attract a girl, who he assumes is deaf.
KIDS FIRST!® Adult Jurors say - I enjoyed Attraction for showing me that teens in China are pretty much the same as in the US. This student made film made me giggle.

A boy tries to attract a girl, who he assumes is deaf. This high school student film gives us a glimpse into the life of a student in China. The camera work is quite good; it primarily uses shots of the two kids together or separately, with some close-ups of the Rubik's cube or the boy's phone tossed in. The background music is rather inconsequential. The film is entirely non-narrative, as the boy makes a presumption that the girl is deaf, and they write notes back and forth. Then, he gets a message that the "deaf girl" has left and, well, story over.

The film's message is "don't presume you know more about someone than you do. "I give Attraction 3.5 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 12 to 18, plus adults. By Julie S., KIDS FIRST!
KIDS FIRST!® Kid Jurors say - I enjoyed Attraction for showing me that teens in China are pretty much the same as in the US. This student made film made me giggle.

A boy tries to attract a girl, who he assumes is deaf. This high school student film gives us a glimpse into the life of a student in China. The camera work is quite good; it primarily uses shots of the two kids together or separately, with some close-ups of the Rubik's cube or the boy's phone tossed in. The background music is rather inconsequential. The film is entirely non-narrative, as the boy makes a presumption that the girl is deaf, and they write notes back and forth. Then, he gets a message that the "deaf girl" has left and, well, story over.

The film's message is "don't presume you know more about someone than you do. "I give Attraction 3.5 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 12 to 18, plus adults. By Julie S., KIDS FIRST!
Runtime: 4 minutes Juror Recommended Age: 12-18 Suggested Retail Price: $ Media: VIDEO



This title is in the KIDS FIRST! Film Festival - it may not be a regular, endorsed title
LEGEND OF QUALICUM BAY, THE
LEGEND OF QUALICUM BAY, THE - JIM GARRISON
Series: FOREIGN SHORT, AGES 8-12
Description - A nine-year-old girl overcomes her fear of being bullied at school after confronting a mythical cougar in the woods of Qualicum Bay on Vancouver Island.
KIDS FIRST!® Adult Jurors say - Delightful and so appropriate for a youth and family audience. Well produced, with terrific youth actors. The theme of bullying is so appropriate.

A nine-year-old girl overcomes her fear of being bullied at school after confronting a mythical cougar in the woods of Qualicum Bay on Vancouver Island. What a wonderful, coming-of-age short film. Great production values, with excellent camera work and audio. Superb casting. Sienna Garrison who plays Sienna and Oliver Mawhinney, who plays Oliver are both outstanding. The topic of bullying is so prevalent these days with kids and the context of Sienna overcoming her fears, with the help of her new friend, Oliver is perfect. The setting of Qualicum Bay is beautiful and a great location for this adventure. Kudos to Jim Garrison for creating such a meaningful short film. It's a perfect fit for KIDS FIRST! Film Festivals.

The film's message is about facing your fears. There is a scene of cutting into a fish which shows blood oozing. Nothing scary but it's just a heads up for parents of queasy kids.

I give The Legend of Qualicum Bay 4.5 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 8 to 12, plus adults. By Julie S., KIDS FIRST!
KIDS FIRST!® Kid Jurors say - Delightful and so appropriate for a youth and family audience. Well produced, with terrific youth actors. The theme of bullying is so appropriate.

A nine-year-old girl overcomes her fear of being bullied at school after confronting a mythical cougar in the woods of Qualicum Bay on Vancouver Island. What a wonderful, coming-of-age short film. Great production values, with excellent camera work and audio. Superb casting. Sienna Garrison who plays Sienna and Oliver Mawhinney, who plays Oliver are both outstanding. The topic of bullying is so prevalent these days with kids and the context of Sienna overcoming her fears, with the help of her new friend, Oliver is perfect. The setting of Qualicum Bay is beautiful and a great location for this adventure. Kudos to Jim Garrison for creating such a meaningful short film. It's a perfect fit for KIDS FIRST! Film Festivals.

The film's message is about facing your fears. There is a scene of cutting into a fish which shows blood oozing. Nothing scary but it's just a heads up for parents of queasy kids.

I give The Legend of Qualicum Bay 4.5 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 8 to 12, plus adults. By Julie S., KIDS FIRST!
Runtime: 18 minutes Juror Recommended Age: 8-12 Suggested Retail Price: $ Media: VIDEO



This title is in the KIDS FIRST! Film Festival - it may not be a regular, endorsed title
STAGE PRESENTS
STAGE PRESENTS - GREG JESCHKE
Series: DOCUMENTARY SHORT, AGES 8-12
Description - Stage Presents: The Gifts of a Shared Experience in Theater is an engaging, intimate film that uses time to reveal what was gained by a group of youngsters who performed together in children's theater. Their presence on stage resulted in the presents they still keep with them a decade later. Stage Presents has been recognized as an Award Winner at the 19th annual Black Swan International Film Festival.
KIDS FIRST!® Adult Jurors say - I love the positive message Stage Presents provides, allowing everyone to participate in their passions, despite their young age. In this musical, you are accepted; no matter who you are or where you come from.

Stage Presents is a documentary that interviews children who participated in Seussical Junior in 2012, and interviewing them once again 10 years later.

I like that the storyline continues a decade later. It emphasizes the Seussical participants' perspective and how it developed over time. We hear their opinions about theater and how it changed their lives. The quality of the camerawork is suitable for exhibition, despite it being a bit shaky at times - however, that adds to the effect of being in a chaotic theater. The vibrant costumes suit the story because they provide an energetic atmosphere to the musical. Seussical costumes are typically colorful. The film is primarily shot at the theater where the musical was performed. It suits the story by making the audience feel as if they were in the theater with the subjects. The music the kids perform adds to the story by showing us how much fun they were having and how it helped them come out of their shell. The subjects start off as little kids performing in Seussical Junior. 10 years later, they revisit their participation and describe how it changed their lives.

The director and producer of this film, Greg Jeschke, is remarkable. He really helps portray the message these kids are trying to bring to the world. My favorite part is how a decade later, the kids who were a part of the musical continue to share their love for theater. To me, it hits close to home because I also have a passion for theater. The older footage is lower quality and more pixelated than the current footage. Other than that, it's terrific and the older footage doesn't detract from the storyline.

The film's message is to pursue your passions and create your own opportunities. We are reminded to live our lives to the best. After watching this film, young kids may definitely be motivated to follow their dreams.

O give Stage Presents 4.5 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 8 to 12. I recommend this film for the KIDS FIRST! film festival because it inspires kids to follow their dreams and provides motivation to others. Kids and parents would really benefit from watching this title. By Sydney S., KIDS FIRST!
KIDS FIRST!® Kid Jurors say - I love the positive message Stage Presents provides, allowing everyone to participate in their passions, despite their young age. In this musical, you are accepted; no matter who you are or where you come from.

Stage Presents is a documentary that interviews children who participated in Seussical Junior in 2012, and interviewing them once again 10 years later.

I like that the storyline continues a decade later. It emphasizes the Seussical participants' perspective and how it developed over time. We hear their opinions about theater and how it changed their lives. The quality of the camerawork is suitable for exhibition, despite it being a bit shaky at times - however, that adds to the effect of being in a chaotic theater. The vibrant costumes suit the story because they provide an energetic atmosphere to the musical. Seussical costumes are typically colorful. The film is primarily shot at the theater where the musical was performed. It suits the story by making the audience feel as if they were in the theater with the subjects. The music the kids perform adds to the story by showing us how much fun they were having and how it helped them come out of their shell. The subjects start off as little kids performing in Seussical Junior. 10 years later, they revisit their participation and describe how it changed their lives.

The director and producer of this film, Greg Jeschke, is remarkable. He really helps portray the message these kids are trying to bring to the world. My favorite part is how a decade later, the kids who were a part of the musical continue to share their love for theater. To me, it hits close to home because I also have a passion for theater. The older footage is lower quality and more pixelated than the current footage. Other than that, it's terrific and the older footage doesn't detract from the storyline.

The film's message is to pursue your passions and create your own opportunities. We are reminded to live our lives to the best. After watching this film, young kids may definitely be motivated to follow their dreams.

O give Stage Presents 4.5 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 8 to 12. I recommend this film for the KIDS FIRST! film festival because it inspires kids to follow their dreams and provides motivation to others. Kids and parents would really benefit from watching this title. By Sydney S., KIDS FIRST!
Runtime: 36 minutes Juror Recommended Age: 8-12 Suggested Retail Price: $ Media: VIDEO



This title is in the KIDS FIRST! Film Festival - it may not be a regular, endorsed title
LOST LETTERS AND WHERE DO THEY GO
LOST LETTERS AND WHERE DO THEY GO - ANA GRACA
Series: FOREIGN SHORT, AGES 8-18
Description - Rupert Bell, a 7 years-old aspiring pilot, is bored at home when the mailman arrives with a miss-addressed letter. When Rupert ventures out onto the streets on a mission to find the right addressee - an apparent grumpy old lady named Clarabella - he finds out that first impressions can be miss-leading and that they actually share a mutual passion.
KIDS FIRST!® Adult Jurors say - What a charming short film from British/Brazilian director Ana Graca. Moving at a deliberate slow pace, we see a new friendship evolve due to a misaddressed letter. The story follows Rupert Bell (Louie Stow), a 7-year-old aspiring pilot, who is bored at home when the mailman arrives with a misaddressed letter. When Rupert ventures out trying to find the right addressee - an apparently grumpy old lady named Clarabella (Elsa Annushka) - he finds out that first impressions can be misleading and that they actually share a mutual passion.

Nicely produced with excellent camera work, audio and casting. Louis Show, who plays the young protagonist, Rupert Bell, really climbs into his role and you resonate with his situation. Elsa Annushka, as Clarabella, has a kind and quiet presence, beginning when she brings a bandage to patch up Rubert's scraped knee. The background music lends an element of suspense and drive as Rupert discovers the misaddressed letter and decides to track down its proper recipient. I love the costuming, especially Rupert's pilot's hat, which shows us his passion for flying - that, plus the scene where he glances up at an airplane in the sky above. When Clarabella shows the photograph of herself and an airplane, Rupert's reaction is adorable and a new friendship begins to unfold.

The film's message is about loneliness and friendship - and how can they have many different shapes. In this case, two very different people find a common bond in their interest in airplanes. I give Lost Letters And Where Do They Go 4.5 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 8 to 18, plus adults. By Julie S., KIDS FIRST!
KIDS FIRST!® Kid Jurors say - What a charming short film from British/Brazilian director Ana Graca. Moving at a deliberate slow pace, we see a new friendship evolve due to a misaddressed letter. The story follows Rupert Bell (Louie Stow), a 7-year-old aspiring pilot, who is bored at home when the mailman arrives with a misaddressed letter. When Rupert ventures out trying to find the right addressee - an apparently grumpy old lady named Clarabella (Elsa Annushka) - he finds out that first impressions can be misleading and that they actually share a mutual passion.

Nicely produced with excellent camera work, audio and casting. Louis Show, who plays the young protagonist, Rupert Bell, really climbs into his role and you resonate with his situation. Elsa Annushka, as Clarabella, has a kind and quiet presence, beginning when she brings a bandage to patch up Rubert's scraped knee. The background music lends an element of suspense and drive as Rupert discovers the misaddressed letter and decides to track down its proper recipient. I love the costuming, especially Rupert's pilot's hat, which shows us his passion for flying - that, plus the scene where he glances up at an airplane in the sky above. When Clarabella shows the photograph of herself and an airplane, Rupert's reaction is adorable and a new friendship begins to unfold.

The film's message is about loneliness and friendship - and how can they have many different shapes. In this case, two very different people find a common bond in their interest in airplanes. I give Lost Letters And Where Do They Go 4.5 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 8 to 18, plus adults. By Julie S., KIDS FIRST!
Runtime: 10 minutes Juror Recommended Age: 8-18 Suggested Retail Price: $ Media: VIDEO



This title is in the KIDS FIRST! Film Festival - it may not be a regular, endorsed title
NEWBIE
NEWBIE - JAMES SKINNER
Series: FOREIGN SHORT, AGES 12-18
Description - Novice teacher Mike is worried his new class won't be able to see past his disability but soon realizes that he too has lessons to learn.
KIDS FIRST!® Adult Jurors say - This one crept up on my slowly. I was unimpressed by the school children's rude behavior at the beginning, but the perseverance of the principal and the novice teacher are quite compelling.

Novice teacher Mike is worried his new class won't be able to see past his disability but soon realizes that he too has lessons to learn. I found this film very touching, especially the ending, which was not anticipated. There are some issues with the production such as lighting, which falls short. However, the storyline and the authenticity of the children in the film are so compelling that I overlooked that. This is a great short film for film festivals to use as a discussion starter about disabilities. The film's message is that kindness comes in a most unexpected way sometimes. I give Newbie 3.5 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 12 to 18, plus adults. By Julie S., KIDS FIRST!
KIDS FIRST!® Kid Jurors say - This one crept up on my slowly. I was unimpressed by the school children's rude behavior at the beginning, but the perseverance of the principal and the novice teacher are quite compelling.

Novice teacher Mike is worried his new class won't be able to see past his disability but soon realizes that he too has lessons to learn. I found this film very touching, especially the ending, which was not anticipated. There are some issues with the production such as lighting, which falls short. However, the storyline and the authenticity of the children in the film are so compelling that I overlooked that. This is a great short film for film festivals to use as a discussion starter about disabilities. The film's message is that kindness comes in a most unexpected way sometimes. I give Newbie 3.5 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 12 to 18, plus adults. By Julie S., KIDS FIRST!
Runtime: 8 minutes Juror Recommended Age: 12-18 Suggested Retail Price: $ Media: VIDEO



This title is in the KIDS FIRST! Film Festival - it may not be a regular, endorsed title
DON T HANG UP!
DON T HANG UP! - JORDYN DIEW
Series: STUDENT SHORT, AGES 12 - 18
Description - A short thriller about a young girl being harassed by an unknown caller.
KIDS FIRST!® Adult Jurors say - The title of this film, Don't Hang Up, is a real thriller grabber with anticipated curiosity, yet it is more humorous than frightening. Elements are in place for some thrills, but the film has an interesting plot twist that anyone who has answered numerous phone calls trying to sell a car extended warranty can relate to.

Don't Hang Up is a short thriller film about a teenage girl who is home alone and being taunted by a caller who is on a mission to sell her an extended warranty for her car.

The story has thriller potential - the scenes are set up perfectly for a thriller, yet the thrill has a plot twist by a humorous antagonist. The cinematography is pretty good, although it has a few hiccups with some blurry images and lighting issues. The lighting is dim and there are shadows that sometimes block the protagonist's face (2:05 when she goes to the door). The music adds to the thriller/humorous twist, especially at the end, which sounds like a cartoon. Director Jordyn Diew also plays the main character in this film, which is a huge undertaking. My favorite part is the anticipation of what is going to occur following the knock on the door, the noise in the closet, and a quick glimpse of a masked person in the window. This is a fun twist on what we think originally will be a thriller.

The message of this film is perhaps that if you answer a phone call from an unidentified caller, you should probably hear them out on what they have to say. Just maybe, if the caller had been able to complete his sales pitch, he may have ended his quest to sell an extended warranty! I give Don't Hang Up 3.5 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 12 to 18, plus adults. By Dominic D. and Julie S., KIDS FIRST!
KIDS FIRST!® Kid Jurors say - The title of this film, Don't Hang Up, is a real thriller grabber with anticipated curiosity, yet it is more humorous than frightening. Elements are in place for some thrills, but the film has an interesting plot twist that anyone who has answered numerous phone calls trying to sell a car extended warranty can relate to.

Don't Hang Up is a short thriller film about a teenage girl who is home alone and being taunted by a caller who is on a mission to sell her an extended warranty for her car.

The story has thriller potential - the scenes are set up perfectly for a thriller, yet the thrill has a plot twist by a humorous antagonist. The cinematography is pretty good, although it has a few hiccups with some blurry images and lighting issues. The lighting is dim and there are shadows that sometimes block the protagonist's face (2:05 when she goes to the door). The music adds to the thriller/humorous twist, especially at the end, which sounds like a cartoon. Director Jordyn Diew also plays the main character in this film, which is a huge undertaking. My favorite part is the anticipation of what is going to occur following the knock on the door, the noise in the closet, and a quick glimpse of a masked person in the window. This is a fun twist on what we think originally will be a thriller.

The message of this film is perhaps that if you answer a phone call from an unidentified caller, you should probably hear them out on what they have to say. Just maybe, if the caller had been able to complete his sales pitch, he may have ended his quest to sell an extended warranty! I give Don't Hang Up 3.5 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 12 to 18, plus adults. By Dominic D. and Julie S., KIDS FIRST!
Runtime: 4 minutes Juror Recommended Age: 12-18 Suggested Retail Price: $ Media: VIDEO



This title is in the KIDS FIRST! Film Festival - it may not be a regular, endorsed title
BE A GREEN HERO
BE A GREEN HERO - DONNA BRITTON-BUKEVICZ
Series: ENVIRONMENTAL SHORT, AGES 2-8
Description - Learn how to Reduce, Reuse and Recycle right every day with catchy upbeat songs sung by fun puppets (Mr. Recycle man, Chef Green and Daisy). Our song lyrics will teach children (and adults) how to "Think Ecologically" and Be a Green Hero!
KIDS FIRST!® Adult Jurors say - This is a sweet animated short that teaches younger viewers how to help the environment.

Learn how to Reduce, Reuse and Recycle right every day with catchy upbeat songs sung by fun puppets (Mr. Recycle man, Chef Green and Daisy). Our song lyrics will teach children (and adults) how to "Think Ecologically" and Be a Green Hero! This delightful short music video features a team of puppets that teach kids about the environment and how to make positive impact on planet Earth. I love the Muppet style puppets; they are adorable and diverse. The music is fun and meaningful.

The film uses images and music to make a far-reaching, long-term impact on the lives of children by teaching them how to help our environment. I give Be A Green Hero 3.5 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 2 to 8, plus adults, By Julie S., KIDS FIRST!
KIDS FIRST!® Kid Jurors say - This is a sweet animated short that teaches younger viewers how to help the environment.

Learn how to Reduce, Reuse and Recycle right every day with catchy upbeat songs sung by fun puppets (Mr. Recycle man, Chef Green and Daisy). Our song lyrics will teach children (and adults) how to "Think Ecologically" and Be a Green Hero! This delightful short music video features a team of puppets that teach kids about the environment and how to make positive impact on planet Earth. I love the Muppet style puppets; they are adorable and diverse. The music is fun and meaningful.

The film uses images and music to make a far-reaching, long-term impact on the lives of children by teaching them how to help our environment. I give Be A Green Hero 3.5 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 2 to 8, plus adults, By Julie S., KIDS FIRST!
Runtime: 14 minutes Juror Recommended Age: 2-8 Suggested Retail Price: $ Media: VIDEO



This title is in the KIDS FIRST! Film Festival - it may not be a regular, endorsed title
MOMO IN DUBAI
MOMO IN DUBAI - ZAKARIA ZARGANY
Series: FOREIGN FEATURE, AGES 8-12
Description - Momo in Dubai' is a children's movie narrating the life of a middle class Kerala (India)family travelling to UAE to spend their summer vacation with their NRI father. The movie is narrated in a humorous style and approaches the shift from expectations of a family to the realities they are required to confront.
KIDS FIRST!® Adult Jurors say - Momo In Dubai is a light, fun film that will warm your heart and put a smile on your face this holiday season. With a unique plot and superb performances, it's sure to be a hit with kids everywhere.

The storyline follows a young boy from Kerala traveling to Dubai to spend the summer vacation with his father, who works there. It humorously approaches the reality that sometimes we have to adjust our expectations.

The story is one that I wish had been made a long time ago - it's a special story that needs to be told. Some of my best friends have parents who work in foreign countries like Saudi Arabia and the UAE and have to live there, and their lives mirror, to a degree, that of Momo's. I love how the plot keeps you guessing as to what will happen next, and it allows ample room for each character to develop. The production quality is superb. The camerawork is great! Coverage is consistent throughout the film, and I especially love the scenes in Momo's town in Kerala and during his escapade with his neighbor. The closeup shots of Momo truly draw out the emotion on the young actor's face. The film was shot in Kerala, in southern India, and in Dubai. I love the verdant scenery in Kerala and how it contrasts with the desert in the UAE. The sets certainly suit the story. The background music does not necessarily stand out, except in some scenes, such as when Momo sees his father off on the bus to the worksite, where it deepens the emotions and enhances the development of the story. Aneesh Menon as Momo's father Muthutty is a bit of an enigmatic figure. I'm unsure as to whether that was intended or not; perhaps his character needs a bit more time to develop. One thing that is odd is that his kids refer to him by his given name. Anu Sithara as Momo's mother is one of my favorite characters. She's strong and independent, but also showcases superb motherly instinct, and Sithara does justice to the role. Arthrey Biju as Momo steals the show though, with his dynamic performance and superb wit and comic timing. The director Ameen Aslam shines in this production -- it's not as simple a concept as it appears, including filming in two countries, but it is executed beautifully thanks to Aslam's work. The writing by Ashif Kakkodi is also spectacular and truly helps tie the film together. The character of Momo is my favorite part of the film -- he's every kid rolled into one. Despite having boundless energy during the day, he shuts off completely after 7pm. He's raucously funny but also deeply sensitive. And he has ambitions, not just for himself, but for his whole family...even if it is sometimes influenced by a desire to brag to his friends.

There are various messages in this film. One is that if there is a will, there is a way; another is that family always sticks together; and another is to never be afraid to explore. Note that it shows kids doing risky things that kids might imitate. I give Momo In Dubai 5 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 8 to 12, plus adults. pecial interest for festivals looking for films about Indian culture, Emirati or travel. By Eshaan M., KIDS FIRST!
KIDS FIRST!® Kid Jurors say - Momo In Dubai is a light, fun film that will warm your heart and put a smile on your face this holiday season. With a unique plot and superb performances, it's sure to be a hit with kids everywhere.

The storyline follows a young boy from Kerala traveling to Dubai to spend the summer vacation with his father, who works there. It humorously approaches the reality that sometimes we have to adjust our expectations.

The story is one that I wish had been made a long time ago - it's a special story that needs to be told. Some of my best friends have parents who work in foreign countries like Saudi Arabia and the UAE and have to live there, and their lives mirror, to a degree, that of Momo's. I love how the plot keeps you guessing as to what will happen next, and it allows ample room for each character to develop. The production quality is superb. The camerawork is great! Coverage is consistent throughout the film, and I especially love the scenes in Momo's town in Kerala and during his escapade with his neighbor. The closeup shots of Momo truly draw out the emotion on the young actor's face. The film was shot in Kerala, in southern India, and in Dubai. I love the verdant scenery in Kerala and how it contrasts with the desert in the UAE. The sets certainly suit the story. The background music does not necessarily stand out, except in some scenes, such as when Momo sees his father off on the bus to the worksite, where it deepens the emotions and enhances the development of the story. Aneesh Menon as Momo's father Muthutty is a bit of an enigmatic figure. I'm unsure as to whether that was intended or not; perhaps his character needs a bit more time to develop. One thing that is odd is that his kids refer to him by his given name. Anu Sithara as Momo's mother is one of my favorite characters. She's strong and independent, but also showcases superb motherly instinct, and Sithara does justice to the role. Arthrey Biju as Momo steals the show though, with his dynamic performance and superb wit and comic timing. The director Ameen Aslam shines in this production -- it's not as simple a concept as it appears, including filming in two countries, but it is executed beautifully thanks to Aslam's work. The writing by Ashif Kakkodi is also spectacular and truly helps tie the film together. The character of Momo is my favorite part of the film -- he's every kid rolled into one. Despite having boundless energy during the day, he shuts off completely after 7pm. He's raucously funny but also deeply sensitive. And he has ambitions, not just for himself, but for his whole family...even if it is sometimes influenced by a desire to brag to his friends.

There are various messages in this film. One is that if there is a will, there is a way; another is that family always sticks together; and another is to never be afraid to explore. Note that it shows kids doing risky things that kids might imitate. I give Momo In Dubai 5 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 8 to 12, plus adults. pecial interest for festivals looking for films about Indian culture, Emirati or travel. By Eshaan M., KIDS FIRST!
Runtime: 105 minutes Juror Recommended Age: 8-12 Suggested Retail Price: $ Media: VIDEO



This title is in the KIDS FIRST! Film Festival - it may not be a regular, endorsed title
BOY'S DREAM, A
BOY'S DREAM, A - ZHE ZHANG
Series: FOREIGN SHORT, AGES 8-18
Description - In 2004, Yeerxiati, a 9-year-old boy who lost his mother as a child, lived here with his grandparents in the deep mountain pasture in Northern Xinjiang. The boy's lamb also lost its mother since childhood and has been taken care of by the little boy. One day, Yeerxiati's father returned to the grassland to pick up his son to study in the city. The little boy who just arrived in the city can't quickly adapt to urban life, and the lamb often appears in Yeerxiati's fantasies and dreams. After a long time, one day, Yeerxiati's grandfather suddenly died, and his grandmother was received by his father to the city. Yeerxiati gradually realized that his life was changing
KIDS FIRST!® Adult Jurors say - What a beautiful, touching story of resilience. This sweet boy loses his mother and his life undergoes a series of changes, which he struggles to adapt to, but does. Heartfelt and honest.

In 2004, Yeerxiati, a 9-year-old boy who lost his mother as a child, lives with his grandparents in the deep mountain pastures in Northern Xinjiang. The boy's lamb also lost its mother and has been taken care of by the little boy. One day, Yeerxiati's father comes to the grassland to pick up his son to study in the city. The little boy arrives in the city and has difficulties adapting to urban life, plus he misses the lamb, which often appears in his dreams. After a while, Yeerxiati's grandfather dies, and his grandmother moves to the city to join him and his father. Yeerxiati gradually realizes that his life is changing.

Beautifully shot with great landscape views of Northern Xinjiang. We don't have much time to establish Yeerxiati's life in the mountains, as very soon after the film starts his father comes to get him. We do see a lot of mischievous behavior by the school children at Yeerxiati's new school and his reaction to them. He struggles with everything in the city, including what appears to be his father's new wife. When Yeerxianti's grandfather passes, he goes to the mountains with his dad to clear out his home and realizes that his life will never be the same. But, we see how he is adjusting to life in the city, even excelling at school. I smiled when his class applauds at his recitation at the end.

This film is dedicated to the hometown where the filmmaker grew up and it's a quiet memory to a life from the past. I give A Boy's Dream 4 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 8 to 18, plus adults. By Julie S., KIDS FIRST!
KIDS FIRST!® Kid Jurors say - What a beautiful, touching story of resilience. This sweet boy loses his mother and his life undergoes a series of changes, which he struggles to adapt to, but does. Heartfelt and honest.

In 2004, Yeerxiati, a 9-year-old boy who lost his mother as a child, lives with his grandparents in the deep mountain pastures in Northern Xinjiang. The boy's lamb also lost its mother and has been taken care of by the little boy. One day, Yeerxiati's father comes to the grassland to pick up his son to study in the city. The little boy arrives in the city and has difficulties adapting to urban life, plus he misses the lamb, which often appears in his dreams. After a while, Yeerxiati's grandfather dies, and his grandmother moves to the city to join him and his father. Yeerxiati gradually realizes that his life is changing.

Beautifully shot with great landscape views of Northern Xinjiang. We don't have much time to establish Yeerxiati's life in the mountains, as very soon after the film starts his father comes to get him. We do see a lot of mischievous behavior by the school children at Yeerxiati's new school and his reaction to them. He struggles with everything in the city, including what appears to be his father's new wife. When Yeerxianti's grandfather passes, he goes to the mountains with his dad to clear out his home and realizes that his life will never be the same. But, we see how he is adjusting to life in the city, even excelling at school. I smiled when his class applauds at his recitation at the end.

This film is dedicated to the hometown where the filmmaker grew up and it's a quiet memory to a life from the past. I give A Boy's Dream 4 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 8 to 18, plus adults. By Julie S., KIDS FIRST!
Runtime: 36 minutes Juror Recommended Age: 8-18 Suggested Retail Price: $ Media: VIDEO



This title is in the KIDS FIRST! Film Festival - it may not be a regular, endorsed title
BETWEEN THE LINES
BETWEEN THE LINES - DOM LEE
Series: FOREIGN SHORT, AGES 8-18
Description - Shy book lover Jane is unexpectedly tasked with saving her beloved library from closure...but help arrives in a surprising way.
KIDS FIRST!® Adult Jurors say - Between the Lines is officially my favorite short film of the week. It is so incredibly imaginative and exceedingly well produced. Plus, it's a musical!

The story follows shy book lover, Jane, who is unexpectedly tasked with saving her beloved library from closure, and help arrives in a surprising way.

What a cool and unexpected film this is and it is so well produced with great camera work and audio recording. I really love the actors' performances, especially Alex Stewart who leads as Jane. But Adam Kurton, Tim McGill, Naomi Richards, and the rest of cast are equally strong. Most importantly, it's a musical, with full out choreographed musical performances that are absolutely terrific. We have songs sung by Lawrence Livingston, Sherlock Holmes and more. Kudos to Grace Hancock for her outstanding music and lyrics; they are absolutely delightful. The choreography by Rebecca Melvin Phillips is stunning. The locations are superb, from the library to the park tea party hosted by the White Rabbit, Little Red Riding Hood's romp through the woods, and more. This could easily be expanded to a full length feature film or Broadway show.

The film's message is about the importance of preserving our libraries; that is where the magic comes from in the form of unforgettable characters that live in our minds forever. I give Between the Lines 5 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 8 to 18, plus adults. By Julie S., KIDS FIRST!
KIDS FIRST!® Kid Jurors say - Between the Lines is officially my favorite short film of the week. It is so incredibly imaginative and exceedingly well produced. Plus, it's a musical!

The story follows shy book lover, Jane, who is unexpectedly tasked with saving her beloved library from closure, and help arrives in a surprising way.

What a cool and unexpected film this is and it is so well produced with great camera work and audio recording. I really love the actors' performances, especially Alex Stewart who leads as Jane. But Adam Kurton, Tim McGill, Naomi Richards, and the rest of cast are equally strong. Most importantly, it's a musical, with full out choreographed musical performances that are absolutely terrific. We have songs sung by Lawrence Livingston, Sherlock Holmes and more. Kudos to Grace Hancock for her outstanding music and lyrics; they are absolutely delightful. The choreography by Rebecca Melvin Phillips is stunning. The locations are superb, from the library to the park tea party hosted by the White Rabbit, Little Red Riding Hood's romp through the woods, and more. This could easily be expanded to a full length feature film or Broadway show.

The film's message is about the importance of preserving our libraries; that is where the magic comes from in the form of unforgettable characters that live in our minds forever. I give Between the Lines 5 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 8 to 18, plus adults. By Julie S., KIDS FIRST!
Runtime: 15 minutes Juror Recommended Age: 8-18 Suggested Retail Price: $ Media: VIDEO



This title is in the KIDS FIRST! Film Festival - it may not be a regular, endorsed title
TELL ME ANOTHER STORY
TELL ME ANOTHER STORY - NOAH BASHEVKIN
Series: SHORT, AGES 12 - 18
Description - Directed by Damani Baker (The House on Coco Road), edited by Jon Henry Fine, and with original music by Meshell Ndegeocello, TELL ME ANOTHER STORY shares the passionate dedication of artistic giants, who have, for over one hundred years, attempted to combat stereotypes and fight for loving, authentic cultural representation in the books children read. The film highlights the creators, past and present, whose focus has uplifted children's literature, from W.E.B. Du Bois, Augusta Baker, Pura Belpr� and Ezra Jack Keats, to Pat Cummings, Marley Dias, Grace Lin, Christopher Myers, and Andrea Davis Pinkney.
KIDS FIRST!® Adult Jurors say - As a lover of children's literature, I was so excited to watch this documentary and it is everything I hoped for and more. Beautifully produced, with great comments of some of our favorite children's authors, this film really addresses the importance of children's books to support cultural diversity.

Tell Me Another Story shares the passionate dedication of artistic giants, who have, for over one hundred years, attempted to combat stereotypes and fight for loving, authentic cultural representation in the books children read. The film highlights the creators, past and present, whose focus has uplifted children's literature, from W.E.B. Du Bois, Augusta Baker, Pura Belpr� and Ezra Jack Keats, to Pat Cummings, Marley Dias, Grace Lin, Christopher Myers, and Andrea Davis Pinkney.

What a delightful ode to children's authors, acknowledging those creators who have influenced children over the decades. This documentary examines the works of superb authors of children's literature, some of them speaking in their own words. I particularly enjoyed the recording of Ezra Jack Keats and the archival video of him speaking with Fred Rogers. Andrea Pinkey speaks about the influences on our country in 1963 - from Martin Luther King Jr. speeches to the murders of four Black children at church and how, months later The Snowy Day by Ezra Jack Keats is released to great acclaim. Although Ezra is not African American, the character on the cover of this book is, and it inspired publishers to publish more African American writers or those of other ethnic backgrounds. The film is very well produced, with a blend of archival footage and contemporary interviews, lots of shots of book covers that made me go, "ah, I love that one." This short film should be required watching for young creatives to help open up their minds to what has come before them. My hat's off to the creators: directed by Damani Baker (director), Jon Henry Fine (editor), and Meshell Ndegeocello (composer).

This film offers an overview of giants in children's literature and the back story of how their work came to be published during some difficult times.

I give Tell Me Another Story 4 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 12 to 18, plus adults. By Julie S., KIDS FIRST!
KIDS FIRST!® Kid Jurors say - As a lover of children's literature, I was so excited to watch this documentary and it is everything I hoped for and more. Beautifully produced, with great comments of some of our favorite children's authors, this film really addresses the importance of children's books to support cultural diversity.

Tell Me Another Story shares the passionate dedication of artistic giants, who have, for over one hundred years, attempted to combat stereotypes and fight for loving, authentic cultural representation in the books children read. The film highlights the creators, past and present, whose focus has uplifted children's literature, from W.E.B. Du Bois, Augusta Baker, Pura Belpr� and Ezra Jack Keats, to Pat Cummings, Marley Dias, Grace Lin, Christopher Myers, and Andrea Davis Pinkney.

What a delightful ode to children's authors, acknowledging those creators who have influenced children over the decades. This documentary examines the works of superb authors of children's literature, some of them speaking in their own words. I particularly enjoyed the recording of Ezra Jack Keats and the archival video of him speaking with Fred Rogers. Andrea Pinkey speaks about the influences on our country in 1963 - from Martin Luther King Jr. speeches to the murders of four Black children at church and how, months later The Snowy Day by Ezra Jack Keats is released to great acclaim. Although Ezra is not African American, the character on the cover of this book is, and it inspired publishers to publish more African American writers or those of other ethnic backgrounds. The film is very well produced, with a blend of archival footage and contemporary interviews, lots of shots of book covers that made me go, "ah, I love that one." This short film should be required watching for young creatives to help open up their minds to what has come before them. My hat's off to the creators: directed by Damani Baker (director), Jon Henry Fine (editor), and Meshell Ndegeocello (composer).

This film offers an overview of giants in children's literature and the back story of how their work came to be published during some difficult times.

I give Tell Me Another Story 4 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 12 to 18, plus adults. By Julie S., KIDS FIRST!
Runtime: 28 minutes Juror Recommended Age: 12-18 Suggested Retail Price: $ Media: VIDEO



This title is in the KIDS FIRST! Film Festival - it may not be a regular, endorsed title
MYSTERIOUS PLACES
MYSTERIOUS PLACES - ANDREW LEOPARD
Series: STUDENT SHORT, AGES 5-12
Description - A young boy finds a mysterious map which leads him on a hunt, where he comes across a mysterious friend. Where this map, and this mysterious friend lead him, nobody knows.
KIDS FIRST!® Adult Jurors say - The short film Mysterious Places shows some promise, although the true mystery is hard to determine. Viewers are set up within the multiple scenes for a mystery and it is quite enjoyable yet, in the end, the storyline falls short in holding your suspense.

The story follows a young boy who finds a map that takes him on a journey to solve a mystery. The map takes him to a variety of locations which appear to be checkpoints, but what that mystery is is unclear.

The idea of the young boy finding a map that leads him on a mysterious journey is quite exciting. The film is adventurous and has the element of suspense to it. The young boy is determined to solve this mystery which engages the audience. His curiosity and perseverance keeps us interested until the end of the film. The cinematography and camera work is excellent. Scenes are captured with a great deal of detail and angles are perfect. Scenes flow nicely and transitions are great. The costumes are suitable for the age of the actors and perfect for the script. The sets and locations fit the script and are perfectly chosen. Some of the locations are ominous which goes well with the theme. The music choices for multiple scenes are loud and overpower the action of the scenes. I felt that the music takes away from the film and is a bit irritating at times. The main character (Ryan Savarese) is fun to watch as he makes several stops displayed on his map in an attempt to solve the mystery. His energy and enthusiasm held my interest. The film was produced by a fifth grader student, which is quite a feat and I commend them for their work. My favorite part of the film is the final scene which takes the young boy to a secluded shed-like structure in an overgrown garden. This scene has viewers in suspense as we wait to find out what the mystery is all about.

The film has potential, but I was disappointed in the ending. Still, it is well made, considering the age of the creator. So, you decide. The message of this film is about perseverance. When solving a mystery, you have to examine clues very carefully, have considerable dedication, and never give up. The young boy does just that!

I give Mysterious Places 3.5 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 5 to 12. Reviewed by Dominic D., KIDS FIRST!
KIDS FIRST!® Kid Jurors say - The short film Mysterious Places shows some promise, although the true mystery is hard to determine. Viewers are set up within the multiple scenes for a mystery and it is quite enjoyable yet, in the end, the storyline falls short in holding your suspense.

The story follows a young boy who finds a map that takes him on a journey to solve a mystery. The map takes him to a variety of locations which appear to be checkpoints, but what that mystery is is unclear.

The idea of the young boy finding a map that leads him on a mysterious journey is quite exciting. The film is adventurous and has the element of suspense to it. The young boy is determined to solve this mystery which engages the audience. His curiosity and perseverance keeps us interested until the end of the film. The cinematography and camera work is excellent. Scenes are captured with a great deal of detail and angles are perfect. Scenes flow nicely and transitions are great. The costumes are suitable for the age of the actors and perfect for the script. The sets and locations fit the script and are perfectly chosen. Some of the locations are ominous which goes well with the theme. The music choices for multiple scenes are loud and overpower the action of the scenes. I felt that the music takes away from the film and is a bit irritating at times. The main character (Ryan Savarese) is fun to watch as he makes several stops displayed on his map in an attempt to solve the mystery. His energy and enthusiasm held my interest. The film was produced by a fifth grader student, which is quite a feat and I commend them for their work. My favorite part of the film is the final scene which takes the young boy to a secluded shed-like structure in an overgrown garden. This scene has viewers in suspense as we wait to find out what the mystery is all about.

The film has potential, but I was disappointed in the ending. Still, it is well made, considering the age of the creator. So, you decide. The message of this film is about perseverance. When solving a mystery, you have to examine clues very carefully, have considerable dedication, and never give up. The young boy does just that!

I give Mysterious Places 3.5 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 5 to 12. Reviewed by Dominic D., KIDS FIRST!
Runtime: 8 minutes Juror Recommended Age: 5-12 Suggested Retail Price: $ Media: VIDEO



This title is in the KIDS FIRST! Film Festival - it may not be a regular, endorsed title
TWO WAYS
TWO WAYS - TOM WANG
Series: FOREIGN DOCUMENTARY, AGE 12-18
Description - Two 16-year-olds in Beijing and Qinghai Huangnan Tibetan Autonomous Prefecture, China. After graduating from high school, they chose two completely different paths in entirely different cultures. One went on to study abroad, and the other inherited the traditional art of his culture---ThangGa
KIDS FIRST!® Adult Jurors say - I enjoyed this documentary and the insight it gives us into Chinese culture in the shape of two young adults.

The film follows two 16-year-olds in Beijing and Qinghai Huangnan Tibetan Autonomous Prefecture, China. After graduating from high school, they chose two completely different paths in entirely different cultures. One goes to study abroad, and the other inherits the traditional art of his culture - ThangGa.

Beautifully produced documentary following two young boys who take very different paths after high school, both are very interesting and the film shows how they pursue their individual goals. Great camera work, good audio, excellent editing. I thoroughly enjoyed this and the glimpse it gives us into Chinese culture. The dialogue is in Mandarin Chinese with English subtitles; the subtitles are somewhat small and not always completely in proper English, but you still understand the drift of the film. The film's message is about how two people can pursue completely different paths to find their own personal version of happiness. I give Two Ways 3.5 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 12 to 18, plus adults. By Julie S., KIDS FIRST!
KIDS FIRST!® Kid Jurors say - I enjoyed this documentary and the insight it gives us into Chinese culture in the shape of two young adults.

The film follows two 16-year-olds in Beijing and Qinghai Huangnan Tibetan Autonomous Prefecture, China. After graduating from high school, they chose two completely different paths in entirely different cultures. One goes to study abroad, and the other inherits the traditional art of his culture - ThangGa.

Beautifully produced documentary following two young boys who take very different paths after high school, both are very interesting and the film shows how they pursue their individual goals. Great camera work, good audio, excellent editing. I thoroughly enjoyed this and the glimpse it gives us into Chinese culture. The dialogue is in Mandarin Chinese with English subtitles; the subtitles are somewhat small and not always completely in proper English, but you still understand the drift of the film. The film's message is about how two people can pursue completely different paths to find their own personal version of happiness. I give Two Ways 3.5 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 12 to 18, plus adults. By Julie S., KIDS FIRST!
Runtime: 9 minutes Juror Recommended Age: 12-18 Suggested Retail Price: $ Media: VIDEO



This title is in the KIDS FIRST! Film Festival - it may not be a regular, endorsed title
RISE, FALL, HOPE
RISE, FALL, HOPE - PEDER HILL
Series: FOREIGN DOCUMENTARY, AGES 5-12
Description - 14-year-olds explore humanity's stumbling struggle for sustainability.
KIDS FIRST!® Adult Jurors say - Rise, Fall, Hope is a documentary film which highlights the concept of sustainability and its importance for our generation and for future generations.

I really enjoyed the way the concept of sustainability is explained - methods are simplistic, yet perfect for a young audience. Causes and effects are highlighted as are solutions to the problems. The set is a school studio with a green screen. There are a variety of people in this short documentary; each has an important role in teaching about sustainability and its importance. This film is a good example of "simple is good." The cinematography and camera work are not high quality but they are sufficient to give the film what it needs for success. The camera is shaky at times and transitions between scenes are not smooth. The film is a cooperative effort of a team of students. The film is a team effort between high school students, each contributing to the project. The final scene shows how the film was made and how fun the cooperative effort was. The last scene is enjoyable and I'm glad it was included. My favorite part is the theme and its educational message. Eyes and ears need to be wide open when it comes to making a difference for our world's diminishing ecosystems. There can never be enough educational resources about sustainability and improving human's bad habits.

The film's message is about responsibility and commitment, emphasizing how we must all do our part, be responsible, and be committed to making a difference for Mother Earth. I give Rise, Fall, Hope 4 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 5 to 12. By Dominic D., KIDS FIRST!
KIDS FIRST!® Kid Jurors say - Rise, Fall, Hope is a documentary film which highlights the concept of sustainability and its importance for our generation and for future generations.

I really enjoyed the way the concept of sustainability is explained - methods are simplistic, yet perfect for a young audience. Causes and effects are highlighted as are solutions to the problems. The set is a school studio with a green screen. There are a variety of people in this short documentary; each has an important role in teaching about sustainability and its importance. This film is a good example of "simple is good." The cinematography and camera work are not high quality but they are sufficient to give the film what it needs for success. The camera is shaky at times and transitions between scenes are not smooth. The film is a cooperative effort of a team of students. The film is a team effort between high school students, each contributing to the project. The final scene shows how the film was made and how fun the cooperative effort was. The last scene is enjoyable and I'm glad it was included. My favorite part is the theme and its educational message. Eyes and ears need to be wide open when it comes to making a difference for our world's diminishing ecosystems. There can never be enough educational resources about sustainability and improving human's bad habits.

The film's message is about responsibility and commitment, emphasizing how we must all do our part, be responsible, and be committed to making a difference for Mother Earth. I give Rise, Fall, Hope 4 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 5 to 12. By Dominic D., KIDS FIRST!
Runtime: 7 minutes Juror Recommended Age: 5-12 Suggested Retail Price: $ Media: VIDEO



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