KIDS FIRST! has endorsed 1733 total Video titles

Below are up to 26 of them

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This title is in the KIDS FIRST! Film Festival - it may not be a regular, endorsed title
DANCE OR DRIVE
DANCE OR DRIVE - STEPHEN SANOW
Series: INDIE SHORT, AGES 12-18
Description - A ten-year-old boy must choose between his two passions and make his own choice while being influenced by family, friends and teachers.
KIDS FIRST!® Adult Jurors say - Terrific film with a terrific message. Although it's about ballet and NASCAR, the theme applies to so many different things in life.

The story follows s young boy who is faced with a difficult decision to choose between his two passions - ballet and NASCAR - when a dress rehearsal for a ballet he is performing coincides with a NASCAR race his dad purchased tickets for. What will he choose?

Excellent production from camera work to editing. Acting is spot on. Trevor Anderson plays Micah with such confidence and conviction, you can see Micah in him. The rest of the cast is equally well positioned.

I love the story premise as it relates to so many other decisions that kids are faced with at this age, especially when they have parents, or one parent, willing and eager to create a lie in order for them to sway their child's choice. The dad here does exactly that, but kudos to the young boy for standing by his own belief.

The sets and locations are well selected, the background music fits. Altogether, this really hits the spot.

The message is about staying true to yourself, make choices based on what you want, not to please others.

I give this film 4.5 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 8 to 12, plus adults. Reviewed by Julie S., KIDS FIRST!
KIDS FIRST!® Kid Jurors say - Terrific film with a terrific message. Although it's about ballet and NASCAR, the theme applies to so many different things in life.

The story follows s young boy who is faced with a difficult decision to choose between his two passions - ballet and NASCAR - when a dress rehearsal for a ballet he is performing coincides with a NASCAR race his dad purchased tickets for. What will he choose?

Excellent production from camera work to editing. Acting is spot on. Trevor Anderson plays Micah with such confidence and conviction, you can see Micah in him. The rest of the cast is equally well positioned.

I love the story premise as it relates to so many other decisions that kids are faced with at this age, especially when they have parents, or one parent, willing and eager to create a lie in order for them to sway their child's choice. The dad here does exactly that, but kudos to the young boy for standing by his own belief.

The sets and locations are well selected, the background music fits. Altogether, this really hits the spot.

The message is about staying true to yourself, make choices based on what you want, not to please others.

I give this film 4.5 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 8 to 12, plus adults. Reviewed by Julie S., KIDS FIRST!
Runtime: 13 minutes Juror Recommended Age: 12-18 Suggested Retail Price: $ Media: VIDEO



This title is in the KIDS FIRST! Film Festival - it may not be a regular, endorsed title
MISQUOTED
MISQUOTED - LINN HEGE SAGEN
Series: FOREIGN SHORT, AGES 10-18
Description - The movie �Misquoted� is a movie made from the idea of actress and director Christine Mowinckel.

The movie is based around the everyday life in school for the students in the Norwegian township of �snes. Conflicts, friendship, music and challenges.
KIDS FIRST!® Adult Jurors say - Misquoted is a great movie! It's about the everyday lives of school students, their friendships, conflicts and sense of belonging. There is an outstanding scene when two students are sitting in a stairwell eating lunch and another student walks in. The pair eating lunch ask her, "Do you have to sing right now?" She responds with "Yeah!" She knows that she is different and that not everyone wants to hear her, but she's going to sing. I find that inspiring. It's impressive and the characters emphasize a sense of community and lifting each other up.

Misquoted follows students in their everyday lives in a Norwegian town. It highlights their struggles and friendships through dialogue and music.

I really liked how this film allows the viewer to see that conflicts and friendships have many sides. Each participant has their own unique point of view that, at times, is "misquoted." Their own sense of identity doesn't always align with what others think and that doesn't need to change what you do.

The cinematography is very good. There are the classic shots of people and activities, but there are also interesting shots that lead into the different scenes and provide a little more depth, such as the opening, which has a close-up of microphones hanging from a tree which lets you know that there is about to be a song. The featured music draws you into the story. A lot of it is performed by the same people that are in the dialogue scenes, so it gives you a glimpse of their feelings about a situation.

The characters are diverse. You don't really get a full sense of knowing any of them individually as the focus is on the group of students. It works and provides quick insight into the school lives of these kids.

School is like a microcosm of our world in that everyone has something going on in their life. We could all benefit from understanding others, talking about things, and lifting each other up. This film is from Norway, with dialogue in Norwegian with English subtitles. However, the second song is completely in English.

I give Misquoted 5 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 10 to 18, plus adults. This film would be great for a youth and family film festival. It is entertainment, but thought provoking. Additionally, the songs are a nice break between the different scenes of dialogue, are written by the students in the film and are catchy.

By Jennifer V., KIDS FIRST.
KIDS FIRST!® Kid Jurors say - Misquoted is a great movie! It's about the everyday lives of school students, their friendships, conflicts and sense of belonging. There is an outstanding scene when two students are sitting in a stairwell eating lunch and another student walks in. The pair eating lunch ask her, "Do you have to sing right now?" She responds with "Yeah!" She knows that she is different and that not everyone wants to hear her, but she's going to sing. I find that inspiring. It's impressive and the characters emphasize a sense of community and lifting each other up.

Misquoted follows students in their everyday lives in a Norwegian town. It highlights their struggles and friendships through dialogue and music.

I really liked how this film allows the viewer to see that conflicts and friendships have many sides. Each participant has their own unique point of view that, at times, is "misquoted." Their own sense of identity doesn't always align with what others think and that doesn't need to change what you do.

The cinematography is very good. There are the classic shots of people and activities, but there are also interesting shots that lead into the different scenes and provide a little more depth, such as the opening, which has a close-up of microphones hanging from a tree which lets you know that there is about to be a song. The featured music draws you into the story. A lot of it is performed by the same people that are in the dialogue scenes, so it gives you a glimpse of their feelings about a situation.

The characters are diverse. You don't really get a full sense of knowing any of them individually as the focus is on the group of students. It works and provides quick insight into the school lives of these kids.

School is like a microcosm of our world in that everyone has something going on in their life. We could all benefit from understanding others, talking about things, and lifting each other up. This film is from Norway, with dialogue in Norwegian with English subtitles. However, the second song is completely in English.

I give Misquoted 5 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 10 to 18, plus adults. This film would be great for a youth and family film festival. It is entertainment, but thought provoking. Additionally, the songs are a nice break between the different scenes of dialogue, are written by the students in the film and are catchy.

By Jennifer V., KIDS FIRST.
Runtime: 32 minutes Juror Recommended Age: 10-18 Suggested Retail Price: $ Media: VIDEO



This title is in the KIDS FIRST! Film Festival - it may not be a regular, endorsed title
BOY'S BEST FRIEND, A
BOY'S BEST FRIEND, A - QUINN FRIEDMAN
Series: STUDENT SHORT, AGES 5-18
Description - A boy tries to find adventure in his cabin during quarantine, but doesn't realize he has the best adventures right next to him.
KIDS FIRST!® Adult Jurors say - I love A Boy's Best Friend. It is a realistic depiction of how a dog can bring joy to people's lives, even when times are tough. The entire film is beautiful.

The film is about the relationship between a boy, Billy (Quinn Friedman), and his dog during the pandemic while his parents are having marital difficulties.

The story line is uplifting and very realistic. A lot of children experience their parents having fights, similar to this boy. But, his dog rescues him and brings him joy. The camerawork is excellent, especially the close-ups of the boy's face. The lighting and audio are excellent. The costumes are typical daily wear by contemporary kids. The location is inside and outside a beautiful house. The music is perhaps a bit saccharine, but it suits the storyline. Most importantly, the boy tries various things to entertain himself; he weeps as he listens to his parents argue; finally, he realizes that his dog is there to keep him company, play with him and absorb his tears. The boy, played by Quinn Friedman, shows real emotions throughout the film and, even though there is no dialogue, you can completely identify with him. My favorite part is when the boy turns to his dog as he sleeps in his arms.

The message of about how much joy an animal can bring into our lives, even when things are not going very well.

I give A Boy's Best Friend 5 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 5 through 18, plus adults. By Pamela L., KIDS FIRST!
KIDS FIRST!® Kid Jurors say - I love A Boy's Best Friend. It is a realistic depiction of how a dog can bring joy to people's lives, even when times are tough. The entire film is beautiful.

The film is about the relationship between a boy, Billy (Quinn Friedman), and his dog during the pandemic while his parents are having marital difficulties.

The story line is uplifting and very realistic. A lot of children experience their parents having fights, similar to this boy. But, his dog rescues him and brings him joy. The camerawork is excellent, especially the close-ups of the boy's face. The lighting and audio are excellent. The costumes are typical daily wear by contemporary kids. The location is inside and outside a beautiful house. The music is perhaps a bit saccharine, but it suits the storyline. Most importantly, the boy tries various things to entertain himself; he weeps as he listens to his parents argue; finally, he realizes that his dog is there to keep him company, play with him and absorb his tears. The boy, played by Quinn Friedman, shows real emotions throughout the film and, even though there is no dialogue, you can completely identify with him. My favorite part is when the boy turns to his dog as he sleeps in his arms.

The message of about how much joy an animal can bring into our lives, even when things are not going very well.

I give A Boy's Best Friend 5 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 5 through 18, plus adults. By Pamela L., KIDS FIRST!
Runtime: 4 minutes Juror Recommended Age: 5-19 Suggested Retail Price: $ Media: VIDEO



This title is in the KIDS FIRST! Film Festival - it may not be a regular, endorsed title
WHITE ROSE, THE
WHITE ROSE, THE - IAN KIM
Series: STUDENT SHORT, AGES 12-18
Description - The story of the German students who resisted the Nazis by distributing incendiary leaflets told in stop-motion animation though the account of former member George J. Wittenstein.
KIDS FIRST!® Adult Jurors say - The White Rose is a very moving film with a message that is relevant today. It is an excellent educational film about the Nazi propaganda system in 20th Century Germany. Additionally, it is very relevant to the world situation, as it reminds us that history often repeats itself.

This documentary is based on an account by George Wittenstein about the distribution of resistant leaflets by two college students, Hans and Sofie Scholl.

I like both the story line and the content. It is a very realistic portrayal of an historical event. The use of animation is a poetic addition, as the filmmaker uses an animated flower with leaflets as petals to move between scenes. The use of shots of the actual leaflets and archival footage of Nazi films create the tension that depicts the environment of Nazi Germany. I like how they include images of quotes from the leaflets onto the screen so you can read those, because you can't read what's on the leaflets themselves. The only shortcoming is that the quotes are onscreen for such a short time that you don't have time to read the entire quote. The animated eyes, which represent what is seen or not seen, is a clever way to illustrate the "seeing" and "not seeing." The ending, when the last page falls from the "flower," aptly relays the tragedy of the story. Using animation to tell the story is very appropriate and clever. The people in the documentary are all real, as shown in the archival footage. The shots of the leaflets and the original films provide insight into what actually happened during the Nazi occupation. The background music helps develop the appropriate amount of tension to fit the subject matter and the shots. The compelling images in this documentary begin with the flowers, dropping the leaflets as if they are petals on the flower. The other images are of people, primarily Nazis, from old footage. They are very effective in telling the story. My favorite part is the use of the animation.

This short film reminds us that history repeats itself and how easily it is to use propaganda to influence people. For example, today we are seeing state-run media in Russia misinforming their population about the invasion by Russia on Ukraine.

I give The White Rose 5 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 12 to 18, plus adults. It provides an excellent history of the resistance by the two German students to the Nazis. Reviewed by Pamela L., KIDS FIRST!
KIDS FIRST!® Kid Jurors say - The White Rose is a very moving film with a message that is relevant today. It is an excellent educational film about the Nazi propaganda system in 20th Century Germany. Additionally, it is very relevant to the world situation, as it reminds us that history often repeats itself.

This documentary is based on an account by George Wittenstein about the distribution of resistant leaflets by two college students, Hans and Sofie Scholl.

I like both the story line and the content. It is a very realistic portrayal of an historical event. The use of animation is a poetic addition, as the filmmaker uses an animated flower with leaflets as petals to move between scenes. The use of shots of the actual leaflets and archival footage of Nazi films create the tension that depicts the environment of Nazi Germany. I like how they include images of quotes from the leaflets onto the screen so you can read those, because you can't read what's on the leaflets themselves. The only shortcoming is that the quotes are onscreen for such a short time that you don't have time to read the entire quote. The animated eyes, which represent what is seen or not seen, is a clever way to illustrate the "seeing" and "not seeing." The ending, when the last page falls from the "flower," aptly relays the tragedy of the story. Using animation to tell the story is very appropriate and clever. The people in the documentary are all real, as shown in the archival footage. The shots of the leaflets and the original films provide insight into what actually happened during the Nazi occupation. The background music helps develop the appropriate amount of tension to fit the subject matter and the shots. The compelling images in this documentary begin with the flowers, dropping the leaflets as if they are petals on the flower. The other images are of people, primarily Nazis, from old footage. They are very effective in telling the story. My favorite part is the use of the animation.

This short film reminds us that history repeats itself and how easily it is to use propaganda to influence people. For example, today we are seeing state-run media in Russia misinforming their population about the invasion by Russia on Ukraine.

I give The White Rose 5 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 12 to 18, plus adults. It provides an excellent history of the resistance by the two German students to the Nazis. Reviewed by Pamela L., KIDS FIRST!
Runtime: 2 minutes Juror Recommended Age: 12-18 Suggested Retail Price: $ Media: VIDEO



This title is in the KIDS FIRST! Film Festival - it may not be a regular, endorsed title
YANGYANG
YANGYANG - OMER MALADY
Series: FOREIGN STUDENT SHORT, AGES 12-18
Description - Yangyang and Anya are good friends growing up in LongyuanXi, but one day, Yangyang's mother want to move to his new husband's house with Yangyang. Yangyang decide to do something before leaving.
KIDS FIRST!® Adult Jurors say - I really enjoyed Yang Yang. It is a very touching short film that engages us in the world of Yang Yang, a young boy, and the impending drama of a child forced to move away from a place where he feels he belongs.

Yang Yang follows a young boy who must leave the place where he grew up, his friend, Anya and his school and join his mother to live with her new husband. Although he tries to be brave and respectful, the trauma and the injustice is more than he can bear.

This is a simple story and well-told story about a childhood trauma to which we all can relate. The narrative is sympathetic to the protagonist, but it deals with the other characters' issues evenly. The script is remarkable in that it successfully carries several storylines - the story of Yang Yang, a confident young boy - happy in his neighborhood; the story of a possibly well-meaning but self-centered mother; the friendship and childhood love story between Yang Yang and Anya and the inner conflict of Yang Yang as he is forced to defy his mother. These are each perfectly developed and perfectly clear. The film is engaging and we immediately are concerned for the protagonist; so much so that, at the end we are worried about what will happen to him. Will someone come find him? Will he be alone on the street with nowhere to go? It says a great deal about the skill of the story development when the audience leaves with concerns about the wellbeing of the protagonist.

The opening with Yang Yang sitting on the wall between the old town and the new town watching a jet go by, wearing a Spider-man t-shirt is a great first shot. It tells us all we need to know about how comfortable Yang Yang is with his world. The camera work throughout is generally good. It seems well-planned and well-executed and the artistry of the street scenes make the piece more professional. The unevenness of the follow-cam sequence add to the tension of the moment. The only shortcoming is the audio as the kids enter the store. The volume seems a little too weak. I enjoyed the location of this film. The winding streets in Yang Yang's neighborhood seem comfortable and safe - as opposed to the open, feature-less sidewalk where Yang Yang and his mother have their confrontation. It seems it is a no-man's-land or at least a place that is harsh and unfeeling.

The background piano music at the opening is very appropriate and fits well with setting us up for a story about a boy. It drops out when Yang Yang sees a mover with a box coming out of his apartment and lets us know that the mood is going to change. I like that the story is told without the background music and that the action and the acting holds our attention. The timing of the music bed's re-entry during Yang Yang's confrontation with his mother adds to the emotion of the moment and in a way makes us feel like what he's doing is okay - at least for him.

Yang Yang carries the story well. He shows us many sides - his contentment, his fear of upsetting his mother, his ability to be deceptive by stealing money from her purse, his happiness with Anya, his determination and his anger in the face of what he perceives as disempowering injustice.

His mother is a rather self-absorbed young woman who gives us a lot of the back story. We understand from her first appearance that she has married a man who hasn't even met her son. This fact leads us to wonder just how substantial the world that Yang Yang is entering actually is. The actress excels at showing us this woman and I like the fact that, while we don't really like the woman she plays, we don't hate her and, at times, even understand why she is doing what she is doing.

Anya is so sweet - no wonder Yang Yang likes her. And - the depth of her character is also well-portrayed. The little actress who plays Anya is terrific. The store scene is a good example of this.

For most films, any part that outshines the others indicates problems with the balance of the film. That is not the case here. The sets and locations, the characters, the camera work, the background music-, all feel very cohesive and natural. Nothing pulls your attention away from the story.

I like the store scene because it carries the emotions of the film. Yang Yang's words seem very brave and very sad. By not speaking directly to the fact that he is leaving, he shows the maturity of a hero and it breaks our hearts. And I like Anya's reaction to her understanding of what is happening. It isn't clear if she understands he is leaving, or if he is issuing an ultimatum on money or if she feels like she doesn't want to accept the gift because she has already fixed her old squirt gun - but it doesn't matter. It could have been all of those things but it is the honesty of that moment where they both show themselves to be more than just children.

The message of the film is that kids' 'emotional lives matter. And that, although in life adults learn to cope and go on, perhaps we should give more thought to and validity of our children's perspectives. The assumption that kids give little or no thought to their lives is not only debilitating, but also foundational to how they feel about themselves as they grow and how they assemble their lives as they age. Raising children without respect for their humanity, without respect for their feelings causes them to feel unworthy and they do the same with their children and so, such disrespect becomes a generational neurosis that gets passed on. Unfortunately, it appears that this is the case rather than the exception. Raising a child to be a well balanced, thoughtful adult is an art form.

I give YangYang 5 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 8 to 18, plus adults. By Chris T., KIDS FIRST!
KIDS FIRST!® Kid Jurors say - I really enjoyed Yang Yang. It is a very touching short film that engages us in the world of Yang Yang, a young boy, and the impending drama of a child forced to move away from a place where he feels he belongs.

Yang Yang follows a young boy who must leave the place where he grew up, his friend, Anya and his school and join his mother to live with her new husband. Although he tries to be brave and respectful, the trauma and the injustice is more than he can bear.

This is a simple story and well-told story about a childhood trauma to which we all can relate. The narrative is sympathetic to the protagonist, but it deals with the other characters' issues evenly. The script is remarkable in that it successfully carries several storylines - the story of Yang Yang, a confident young boy - happy in his neighborhood; the story of a possibly well-meaning but self-centered mother; the friendship and childhood love story between Yang Yang and Anya and the inner conflict of Yang Yang as he is forced to defy his mother. These are each perfectly developed and perfectly clear. The film is engaging and we immediately are concerned for the protagonist; so much so that, at the end we are worried about what will happen to him. Will someone come find him? Will he be alone on the street with nowhere to go? It says a great deal about the skill of the story development when the audience leaves with concerns about the wellbeing of the protagonist.

The opening with Yang Yang sitting on the wall between the old town and the new town watching a jet go by, wearing a Spider-man t-shirt is a great first shot. It tells us all we need to know about how comfortable Yang Yang is with his world. The camera work throughout is generally good. It seems well-planned and well-executed and the artistry of the street scenes make the piece more professional. The unevenness of the follow-cam sequence add to the tension of the moment. The only shortcoming is the audio as the kids enter the store. The volume seems a little too weak. I enjoyed the location of this film. The winding streets in Yang Yang's neighborhood seem comfortable and safe - as opposed to the open, feature-less sidewalk where Yang Yang and his mother have their confrontation. It seems it is a no-man's-land or at least a place that is harsh and unfeeling.

The background piano music at the opening is very appropriate and fits well with setting us up for a story about a boy. It drops out when Yang Yang sees a mover with a box coming out of his apartment and lets us know that the mood is going to change. I like that the story is told without the background music and that the action and the acting holds our attention. The timing of the music bed's re-entry during Yang Yang's confrontation with his mother adds to the emotion of the moment and in a way makes us feel like what he's doing is okay - at least for him.

Yang Yang carries the story well. He shows us many sides - his contentment, his fear of upsetting his mother, his ability to be deceptive by stealing money from her purse, his happiness with Anya, his determination and his anger in the face of what he perceives as disempowering injustice.

His mother is a rather self-absorbed young woman who gives us a lot of the back story. We understand from her first appearance that she has married a man who hasn't even met her son. This fact leads us to wonder just how substantial the world that Yang Yang is entering actually is. The actress excels at showing us this woman and I like the fact that, while we don't really like the woman she plays, we don't hate her and, at times, even understand why she is doing what she is doing.

Anya is so sweet - no wonder Yang Yang likes her. And - the depth of her character is also well-portrayed. The little actress who plays Anya is terrific. The store scene is a good example of this.

For most films, any part that outshines the others indicates problems with the balance of the film. That is not the case here. The sets and locations, the characters, the camera work, the background music-, all feel very cohesive and natural. Nothing pulls your attention away from the story.

I like the store scene because it carries the emotions of the film. Yang Yang's words seem very brave and very sad. By not speaking directly to the fact that he is leaving, he shows the maturity of a hero and it breaks our hearts. And I like Anya's reaction to her understanding of what is happening. It isn't clear if she understands he is leaving, or if he is issuing an ultimatum on money or if she feels like she doesn't want to accept the gift because she has already fixed her old squirt gun - but it doesn't matter. It could have been all of those things but it is the honesty of that moment where they both show themselves to be more than just children.

The message of the film is that kids' 'emotional lives matter. And that, although in life adults learn to cope and go on, perhaps we should give more thought to and validity of our children's perspectives. The assumption that kids give little or no thought to their lives is not only debilitating, but also foundational to how they feel about themselves as they grow and how they assemble their lives as they age. Raising children without respect for their humanity, without respect for their feelings causes them to feel unworthy and they do the same with their children and so, such disrespect becomes a generational neurosis that gets passed on. Unfortunately, it appears that this is the case rather than the exception. Raising a child to be a well balanced, thoughtful adult is an art form.

I give YangYang 5 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 8 to 18, plus adults. By Chris T., KIDS FIRST!
Runtime: 6 minutes Juror Recommended Age: 12-18 Suggested Retail Price: $ Media: VIDEO



This title is in the KIDS FIRST! Film Festival - it may not be a regular, endorsed title
STATUE, THE (PEYKAREH)
STATUE, THE (PEYKAREH) - MOHSEN SALEHI FARD
Series: FOREIGN SHORT, AGES 5-18
Description - The sculptor struggles a lot every day to create a new sculpture. And the sculpture that loses its freedom when it takes shape.
KIDS FIRST!® Adult Jurors say - I enjoyed the claymation short film, The Statue, a lot! I like seeing how the clay ball resists the sculptor's efforts to make it into a statue and we see the struggle between the man and the clay.

The story follows a sculptor that tries to shape a lump of clay into a statue.

I really like the way we watch battle between the sculptor and the ball of clay. I love how the lump of clay is rather anthropomorphic, particularly when the sculptor reasons with it by showing it a photograph of a sculpture. It gets it and then allows itself to be molded. Brilliant! I love how the clay dances once it becomes the image of a person and the scene where it dances while in the kiln is particularly clever. Using claymation to make the film is so apropos to the story. The stop motion camera work is well executed. There are great close-ups that show us the emotions of the lump of clay. The backgrounds are perfect for the film as they depict a typical studio that a sculptor might work in. The location suit the story of a typical pottery. The background accordion music is delightful and sounds very "old world-ish." The primary character development is with the clay, which transforms from a lump of clay into a human sculpture. The sculptor also shows great progression from someone who cannot tame the clay to someone who does tame it. This is such a lovely short film. I can't wait to share it with young people.

The message is that even the most difficult obstacle can be tamed.

I give The Statue 4 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 5 to 18, plus adults. This is really a fun piece that children and adults will enjoy together.
KIDS FIRST!® Kid Jurors say - I enjoyed the claymation short film, The Statue, a lot! I like seeing how the clay ball resists the sculptor's efforts to make it into a statue and we see the struggle between the man and the clay.

The story follows a sculptor that tries to shape a lump of clay into a statue.

I really like the way we watch battle between the sculptor and the ball of clay. I love how the lump of clay is rather anthropomorphic, particularly when the sculptor reasons with it by showing it a photograph of a sculpture. It gets it and then allows itself to be molded. Brilliant! I love how the clay dances once it becomes the image of a person and the scene where it dances while in the kiln is particularly clever. Using claymation to make the film is so apropos to the story. The stop motion camera work is well executed. There are great close-ups that show us the emotions of the lump of clay. The backgrounds are perfect for the film as they depict a typical studio that a sculptor might work in. The location suit the story of a typical pottery. The background accordion music is delightful and sounds very "old world-ish." The primary character development is with the clay, which transforms from a lump of clay into a human sculpture. The sculptor also shows great progression from someone who cannot tame the clay to someone who does tame it. This is such a lovely short film. I can't wait to share it with young people.

The message is that even the most difficult obstacle can be tamed.

I give The Statue 4 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 5 to 18, plus adults. This is really a fun piece that children and adults will enjoy together.
Runtime: 10 minutes Juror Recommended Age: 5-18 Suggested Retail Price: $ Media: VIDEO



This title is in the KIDS FIRST! Film Festival - it may not be a regular, endorsed title
BING - NICKY
BING - NICKY - CHRISTINA CONDE
Series: FOREIGN INDIE SHORT, AGES 2-5
Description - Bing is a groundbreaking television series. Celebrating the noisy, joyful, messy reality of life when you're a preschooler, Bing stories are small but full of drama; everyday micro-dramas that all young children and the grown-ups in their lives will recognize.
KIDS FIRST!® Adult Jurors say - Bing - Nicky is bright, fun and filled with wonderful, colorful characters.

Bing is a television series celebrating the noisy, joyful, messy reality of life when you're a preschooler. The stories are short, but full of drama -- everyday micro-dramas that young children and grown-ups will recognize as they learn to share, develop friendships and remember that there is always someone younger than you that might need your help, even when you are a child yourself.

The animated story is easy to follow, especially important for its target audience. The episode tackles issues such as being concerned that another child has your toy, realizing its more fun to help them enjoy the things you do, and that things may go wrong, but that doesn't mean they can't be fixed. The animation is very well done; the characters, backgrounds and visuals are lovely and enjoyable. It is well constructed for a preschool audience with clear and easy to view scenes. The backgrounds of the house interior, the car, and the outdoors are all very detailed and interesting. The background music is pleasant and non-intrusive. There are brightly colored clothes for the characters and a clearly diverse cast. The main characters are child-like characters that have distinct personalities. We easily know which one is younger. The main character, Bing, is very well thought out. The adult characters are positively portrayed and listen to the children, which is good to see. All of the main child characters are easy to understand and watch. There is a recap of this episode (Bings day) at the end explaining, from Bing's point of view, his feelings about what happened. This is a clever ending to the episode.

The message of this episode is about being a friend and how helping others is a nice thing to do.

I give Bing - Nicky 4.5 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 2 to 5. By Richard L. and Julie S., KIDS FIRST!
KIDS FIRST!® Kid Jurors say - Bing - Nicky is bright, fun and filled with wonderful, colorful characters.

Bing is a television series celebrating the noisy, joyful, messy reality of life when you're a preschooler. The stories are short, but full of drama -- everyday micro-dramas that young children and grown-ups will recognize as they learn to share, develop friendships and remember that there is always someone younger than you that might need your help, even when you are a child yourself.

The animated story is easy to follow, especially important for its target audience. The episode tackles issues such as being concerned that another child has your toy, realizing its more fun to help them enjoy the things you do, and that things may go wrong, but that doesn't mean they can't be fixed. The animation is very well done; the characters, backgrounds and visuals are lovely and enjoyable. It is well constructed for a preschool audience with clear and easy to view scenes. The backgrounds of the house interior, the car, and the outdoors are all very detailed and interesting. The background music is pleasant and non-intrusive. There are brightly colored clothes for the characters and a clearly diverse cast. The main characters are child-like characters that have distinct personalities. We easily know which one is younger. The main character, Bing, is very well thought out. The adult characters are positively portrayed and listen to the children, which is good to see. All of the main child characters are easy to understand and watch. There is a recap of this episode (Bings day) at the end explaining, from Bing's point of view, his feelings about what happened. This is a clever ending to the episode.

The message of this episode is about being a friend and how helping others is a nice thing to do.

I give Bing - Nicky 4.5 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 2 to 5. By Richard L. and Julie S., KIDS FIRST!
Runtime: 7 minutes Juror Recommended Age: 2-5 Suggested Retail Price: $ Media: VIDEO



This title is in the KIDS FIRST! Film Festival - it may not be a regular, endorsed title
AKISSI
AKISSI - LOUP DE KERMEL
Series: FOREIGN INDIE SHORT, AGES 5-8
Description - Akissi can't take being the youngest in her family anymore! She would like a little brother or sister so much... One day, she meets Boubou, a little monkey, who is truly the little brother of her dreams! But she will face many challenges to be able to live happily with her new "brother."
KIDS FIRST!® Adult Jurors say - What a fun short animated film, based on the Akissi books by Marguerite Abouet and Mathieu Sapin. The quick moving action of Akissi, in search of a brother in the form of a monkey is delightful and fun.

The storyline follows a young girl, Akissi who broods over not having a younger sibling. Trying to convince her mother that she is responsible, she is sent to the market to pick up some fish for dinner. On her way home, she meets and rescues a little monkey, Boubou, who she takes home and that leads to a whole host of chaotic events until Boubou endears himself to her family.

What an adorable short animated film this is. Akissi is young, precocious and adorable. She is easy to relate to, especially when she rescues little Boubou. Her adventures are a bit much for a young child, but you have to remember they are a complete fantasy. When Akissi gets sent to her room and Boubou gets loose, all havoc breaks loose until Boubou manages to win everyone's heart - but not without some true challenges. In the end, Boubou steals his way into the family and becomes the brother that Akissi dreamed of. The 2D animation is bright and colorful and detailed. It is a pleasure to watch. The dialogue is all in French, with English subtitles, which are sometimes challenging to read when the color of the type doesn't contrast distinctly from the images. It is directed by Alexandre Coste who has a host of other wonderful animated series to his credit. Voice-overs are by Kayla Lingale (Akissi), yohan Babin (Papou), Yann Ismael Youre (Edmond) and Mike Danon (Branconnier) - all of which deliver terrific performances.

The message of the film is: watch out what you wish for, it might come true.

I give Akissi 4 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 5 to 12. By Julie S., KIDS FIRST!
KIDS FIRST!® Kid Jurors say - What a fun short animated film, based on the Akissi books by Marguerite Abouet and Mathieu Sapin. The quick moving action of Akissi, in search of a brother in the form of a monkey is delightful and fun.

The storyline follows a young girl, Akissi who broods over not having a younger sibling. Trying to convince her mother that she is responsible, she is sent to the market to pick up some fish for dinner. On her way home, she meets and rescues a little monkey, Boubou, who she takes home and that leads to a whole host of chaotic events until Boubou endears himself to her family.

What an adorable short animated film this is. Akissi is young, precocious and adorable. She is easy to relate to, especially when she rescues little Boubou. Her adventures are a bit much for a young child, but you have to remember they are a complete fantasy. When Akissi gets sent to her room and Boubou gets loose, all havoc breaks loose until Boubou manages to win everyone's heart - but not without some true challenges. In the end, Boubou steals his way into the family and becomes the brother that Akissi dreamed of. The 2D animation is bright and colorful and detailed. It is a pleasure to watch. The dialogue is all in French, with English subtitles, which are sometimes challenging to read when the color of the type doesn't contrast distinctly from the images. It is directed by Alexandre Coste who has a host of other wonderful animated series to his credit. Voice-overs are by Kayla Lingale (Akissi), yohan Babin (Papou), Yann Ismael Youre (Edmond) and Mike Danon (Branconnier) - all of which deliver terrific performances.

The message of the film is: watch out what you wish for, it might come true.

I give Akissi 4 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 5 to 12. By Julie S., KIDS FIRST!
Runtime: 26 minutes Juror Recommended Age: 5-8 Suggested Retail Price: $ Media: VIDEO



This title is in the KIDS FIRST! Film Festival - it may not be a regular, endorsed title
SNAIL AND HEDGEHOG
SNAIL AND HEDGEHOG - ISAMU HIRABAYASHI
Series: FOREIGN INDIE SHORT, AGES 12-18
Description - Mimi (15) and Akari (15) are users of the latest web chat. This web chat uses artificial intelligence to analyze pictures drawn by users and turn those pictures into characters. Mimi draws a snail while Akari draws a hedgehog. The two meet and talk through the web chat for the first time. Because they have just met and are communicating without seeing each other's faces, they are able to talk to each other about their problems. Akari has family problems while Mimi has problems related to illness.
KIDS FIRST!® Adult Jurors say - Snail and Hedgehog is one of the inventive films I have seen in some time! I like how it addresses contemporary issues such as web chatting, A.I., personal issues, and friendships between strangers. The result is something extraordinary and very exciting.

The storyline follows two 15-year-old girls, Mimi and Akari, who meet and interact via an web chat and discover that they have a lot common -- being the same age and gender, and are both in the process of studying for high school examinations. Their discussions also evolve into family and personal issues such as divorce and disease. Their A.I. connection consists of transforming a drawing into characters in order to play out adventures. Mimi's picture is of a snail and Akari's picture is a hedgehog.

I enjoyed how these two girls find out that they have numerous things in common right off the bat and are able to aide each other, for personal and familiar concerns, in the brief amount of time they are in the A.I. Metaverse. The animation is very creative - the A.I. web chat has an animated comic-book appeal, complete with partitioning the scenes. Plus the bright color scheme adds to this effect. Additionally, I enjoyed how a new A.I. adventure coincides with a brand new topic of discussion for the girls, i.e. one states that she doesn't understand a particular adventure and the discussion turns into how she feels her class artwork is just as messed-up. I like the design of the Snail and Hedgehog characters, which are simple and cute. The backgrounds are definitely critical to the story as they correlate to the A.I. adventures and conversational tone between characters. The music score also correlates to their adventures and their discussion, which is non-narrative, delivered in comic-book-style bubbles. For example, the music score of a dramatic A.I. adventure game set in the medieval period appears to be intense, like the scene and corresponding conversation. Akari and Mimi are disguised through the Snail and Hedgehog characters throughout most of the film. The director, Isamu Hiraboyashi, definitely has a gift of ingenuity and creativity that makes this short film stand out. The animator and music scorer deserve kudos for creativity and aligning user subject matter and adventure imagery. My favorite part is how Mimi and Akari surprisingly reveal themselves at the end. I also like Akari's advice for Mimi to do what SHE wants in life, regardless of Mimi's parents wanting her to go into the civil service.

The message of the film is: one never knows when a distant stranger can lend a helping hand in life. There are some scenes of violence, although the blood does not look gory or real. It could be disturbing for younger children.

I give Snail and Hedgehog 4.5 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 10 to 18, plus adults. Reviewed by Kimberly M. and Julie S., KIDS FIRST!
KIDS FIRST!® Kid Jurors say - Snail and Hedgehog is one of the inventive films I have seen in some time! I like how it addresses contemporary issues such as web chatting, A.I., personal issues, and friendships between strangers. The result is something extraordinary and very exciting.

The storyline follows two 15-year-old girls, Mimi and Akari, who meet and interact via an web chat and discover that they have a lot common -- being the same age and gender, and are both in the process of studying for high school examinations. Their discussions also evolve into family and personal issues such as divorce and disease. Their A.I. connection consists of transforming a drawing into characters in order to play out adventures. Mimi's picture is of a snail and Akari's picture is a hedgehog.

I enjoyed how these two girls find out that they have numerous things in common right off the bat and are able to aide each other, for personal and familiar concerns, in the brief amount of time they are in the A.I. Metaverse. The animation is very creative - the A.I. web chat has an animated comic-book appeal, complete with partitioning the scenes. Plus the bright color scheme adds to this effect. Additionally, I enjoyed how a new A.I. adventure coincides with a brand new topic of discussion for the girls, i.e. one states that she doesn't understand a particular adventure and the discussion turns into how she feels her class artwork is just as messed-up. I like the design of the Snail and Hedgehog characters, which are simple and cute. The backgrounds are definitely critical to the story as they correlate to the A.I. adventures and conversational tone between characters. The music score also correlates to their adventures and their discussion, which is non-narrative, delivered in comic-book-style bubbles. For example, the music score of a dramatic A.I. adventure game set in the medieval period appears to be intense, like the scene and corresponding conversation. Akari and Mimi are disguised through the Snail and Hedgehog characters throughout most of the film. The director, Isamu Hiraboyashi, definitely has a gift of ingenuity and creativity that makes this short film stand out. The animator and music scorer deserve kudos for creativity and aligning user subject matter and adventure imagery. My favorite part is how Mimi and Akari surprisingly reveal themselves at the end. I also like Akari's advice for Mimi to do what SHE wants in life, regardless of Mimi's parents wanting her to go into the civil service.

The message of the film is: one never knows when a distant stranger can lend a helping hand in life. There are some scenes of violence, although the blood does not look gory or real. It could be disturbing for younger children.

I give Snail and Hedgehog 4.5 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 10 to 18, plus adults. Reviewed by Kimberly M. and Julie S., KIDS FIRST!
Runtime: 13 minutes Juror Recommended Age: 12-18 Suggested Retail Price: $ Media: VIDEO



This title is in the KIDS FIRST! Film Festival - it may not be a regular, endorsed title
PANDALAND: MAKING IT COUNT
PANDALAND: MAKING IT COUNT - MARTHA DAVIS
Series: DOCUMENTARY, AGES 5-12
Description - Pandaland: Making It Count is about how children became engaged and learned to grapple with big social issues. The filmmaker accomplished this through play in a multi-media installation of 70+ toy pandas she created in her neighborhood. The vibe of the film is lighthearted and optimistic. As the children participate in an election on behalf of the pandas, their experience embodies community building, demonstrates acts of civic engagement and conveys the important message that, working together, even young children can effect change. The film is a life-affirming tribute to kids' compassion and the birth of their activism.
KIDS FIRST!® Adult Jurors say - I enjoyed Pandaland: Making It Count because it is a very friendly way to introduce young people to social issues that they may not be aware of. I like the imagination that was put into creating the set.

The documentary is about how children became engaged and learned to grapple big social issues through playing in a multi-media installation of more than 70 toy pandas in a downtown Toronto neighborhood.

I like how the film start off with typical imagination play for the children and then it morphs into addressing political issues, which is a clever way to engage children in this way. The film's vibe is lighthearted and optimistic, and demonstrates how even young children can effect change. The camerawork and audio recording are very good. Martha Moore Davis is the writer, producer, director and narrator. Her gentle narration is a great addition to the film. The set, with all the 70+ pandas, is awe-inspiring. The background music and sound effects help move the story along. The kids featured in the documentary are articulate in expressing their knowledge about their experience.

My favorite part is when the lake is revealed to be toxic, which prompted the kids to solve issues and also introduce them real problems of the real world.

The message of the film is that you can change things.

I give Pandaland: Making It Count 3.5 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 5 to 12, plus adults. This is a perfect example of "stealth learning" that teaches kids real life problems that exist in society, from a "panda" point of view. By Tom W. and Julie S., KIDS FIRST!
KIDS FIRST!® Kid Jurors say - I enjoyed Pandaland: Making It Count because it is a very friendly way to introduce young people to social issues that they may not be aware of. I like the imagination that was put into creating the set.

The documentary is about how children became engaged and learned to grapple big social issues through playing in a multi-media installation of more than 70 toy pandas in a downtown Toronto neighborhood.

I like how the film start off with typical imagination play for the children and then it morphs into addressing political issues, which is a clever way to engage children in this way. The film's vibe is lighthearted and optimistic, and demonstrates how even young children can effect change. The camerawork and audio recording are very good. Martha Moore Davis is the writer, producer, director and narrator. Her gentle narration is a great addition to the film. The set, with all the 70+ pandas, is awe-inspiring. The background music and sound effects help move the story along. The kids featured in the documentary are articulate in expressing their knowledge about their experience.

My favorite part is when the lake is revealed to be toxic, which prompted the kids to solve issues and also introduce them real problems of the real world.

The message of the film is that you can change things.

I give Pandaland: Making It Count 3.5 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 5 to 12, plus adults. This is a perfect example of "stealth learning" that teaches kids real life problems that exist in society, from a "panda" point of view. By Tom W. and Julie S., KIDS FIRST!
Runtime: 14 minutes Juror Recommended Age: 5-12 Suggested Retail Price: $ Media: VIDEO



This title is in the KIDS FIRST! Film Festival - it may not be a regular, endorsed title
POWER OF THE STONE, THE
POWER OF THE STONE, THE - ENRICO MONDINO
Series: INDIE SHORT, AGE 5-12
Description - The Evil Queen holds the population of a peaceful village in check at the foot of a mountain. A group of boys, under the guidance of their spiritual leader, try to defeat it and restore peace, but the road to follow is longer and more tortuous than expected.
KIDS FIRST!® Adult Jurors say - I really enjoyed The Power Of The Stone! I like how it shows how perseverance and the listening to guidance lead leads them to defeat the Evil Queen. I like that the story has two clearly drawn sides -- the Evil Queen and her henchmen versus the spiritual leader's pupil -- making it easily understood. I also like the realism of the story, such as when one of the girls goes into the castle after having a vision of something bad that is going to happen and then gets taken away.

The story is about an Evil Queen who holds the residents of a peaceful village in check at the foot of a mountain. A group of boys, helped by their spiritual leader, undertakes defeating her and restoring peace, but the road to follow is more tortuous than expected.

This is a well-crafted story that catches your attention from the very beginning and holds it throughout. As it develops, we are impressed by the students who are unwilling to give up, despite facing obstacles. Their spiritual leader has a big influence on them. This is an outstanding production, professional in every way from the camerawork, audio recording, costumes, sets and locations, background music, to the acting. The cast is mostly young people, with a few key adults. The writer and director, Enrico Mondino and co-writer Waldemara Lentini have crafted a well thought out storyline. I love the location in the forest area, which allows the story to appear almost timeless. Also, the costumes have timelessness to them. My favorite part of the film is the final battle scene when the Evil Queen's forces go head to head with the spiritual leader and the students and one of queen's henchmen eventually betrays her and takes their side. The dialogue is in Italian, with English sub-titles.

The message of the film is that nothing is impossible, even when it seems to be so. It teaches the importance of preserve.

I give The Power of the Stone 4.5 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 8 to 18, plus adults. By Tom W. and Julie S., KIDS FIRST!
KIDS FIRST!® Kid Jurors say - I really enjoyed The Power Of The Stone! I like how it shows how perseverance and the listening to guidance lead leads them to defeat the Evil Queen. I like that the story has two clearly drawn sides -- the Evil Queen and her henchmen versus the spiritual leader's pupil -- making it easily understood. I also like the realism of the story, such as when one of the girls goes into the castle after having a vision of something bad that is going to happen and then gets taken away.

The story is about an Evil Queen who holds the residents of a peaceful village in check at the foot of a mountain. A group of boys, helped by their spiritual leader, undertakes defeating her and restoring peace, but the road to follow is more tortuous than expected.

This is a well-crafted story that catches your attention from the very beginning and holds it throughout. As it develops, we are impressed by the students who are unwilling to give up, despite facing obstacles. Their spiritual leader has a big influence on them. This is an outstanding production, professional in every way from the camerawork, audio recording, costumes, sets and locations, background music, to the acting. The cast is mostly young people, with a few key adults. The writer and director, Enrico Mondino and co-writer Waldemara Lentini have crafted a well thought out storyline. I love the location in the forest area, which allows the story to appear almost timeless. Also, the costumes have timelessness to them. My favorite part of the film is the final battle scene when the Evil Queen's forces go head to head with the spiritual leader and the students and one of queen's henchmen eventually betrays her and takes their side. The dialogue is in Italian, with English sub-titles.

The message of the film is that nothing is impossible, even when it seems to be so. It teaches the importance of preserve.

I give The Power of the Stone 4.5 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 8 to 18, plus adults. By Tom W. and Julie S., KIDS FIRST!
Runtime: 28 minutes Juror Recommended Age: 5-12 Suggested Retail Price: $ Media: VIDEO



This title is in the KIDS FIRST! Film Festival - it may not be a regular, endorsed title
PASUYA AND CLOUD
PASUYA AND CLOUD - FU CHING HSU
Series: STUDENT SHORT, AGES 5-12
Description - This short-animation is about a aboriginal boy and a Clouded Leopard. The boy rescues the Leopard from a trap, and they became the very best of friends. One day, the two were out hunting, and they met the Leopard's mother. After that, the story becomes emotional. The Leopard had to leave the boy, because it missed her mother so much. This film is Taiwanese Mandarin, but have subtitles.
KIDS FIRST!® Adult Jurors say - I like Pasuya and Cloud a lot. The stop animation and hand crafted backgrounds show how much hard work and dedication went into creating it. It is a heartwarming story of a boy who loves an animal.

The story tells about a young boy, Pasuya meeting a leopard named Cloud on a hunting trip. Pasuya brings Cloud back to his village and after Cloud saves Pasuya's grandmother from a snake attack, Cloud is accepted into the village and becomes one with the people, despite their being different species. On another hunting trip, Cloud meets her mother. After, Pasuya notices that Cloud is sad he lets her go back into the wild to join her mother.

I enjoy how Pasuya is persistent in proving that Cloud is worthy of being a part of his village. And, even though Cloud is being judged, she attacks the snake to save Pasuya's grandmother, proving to the rest of the people in the village that she will protect the people regardless of how they judge her.

I love the mixture of 2D characters and 3D backgrounds. Although this is stop motion animation, Ting Yuk Yuen still manages to zoom in out, giving us different perspectives. The costumes match those of hunter and gatherer early civilizations. Some of the characters that are older are riddled with wrinkles and some gray hair.

This handcrafted, stop-motion animation has designated foregrounds, middle and backgrounds, showing the depth of the forest as if it was real. The music in the introduction is full of drum beats that reel in the viewer. The sound effects when Pasuya is cooking dinner with Cloud are very realistic.

It is so beautiful to see the growth of Pasuya and Cloud's relationship. I love how two beings from two different worlds can meet and become best friends. This video shows the relationship between a human and an animal, and how they can become best friends, despite being able to communicate with words. I really enjoyed the moment when the baby leopard meets its mother during the hunting trip. It shows how if two people are meant to meet, then they will. Everything happens for a reason.

Sometimes the most difficult feeling to cope with is coming to terms with the idea that people you think will be in your life forever do not always stay around. Perhaps a friendship you have for two years was only meant to last for those two years. Even though we may want to hold onto that friendship, those people have grown differently and we no longer need each other in our lives. The adage "if you love someone or something, set it free" may sound trivial, but it is applicable here. This film does have some scenes of acts of violence and some negative behavior. There is some fighting between the animals, but it truly is not gory or bloody. There is also the explanation of gender roles which would be considered unacceptable to our audiences telling how women do the cleaning and cooking, meanwhile the men carry heavy things. The dialogue is in Chinese with English subtitles.

I give this film 4.5 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 8 to 12. It is a beautiful story about accepting others that are different from you. If we teach children at a young age not to hate people or things that are different from them, what a difference it would make in our world. This video discusses spiritual ancestral topics that early civilizations used to worship and this may differ from your own spiritual or religious beliefs.
KIDS FIRST!® Kid Jurors say - I like Pasuya and Cloud a lot. The stop animation and hand crafted backgrounds show how much hard work and dedication went into creating it. It is a heartwarming story of a boy who loves an animal.

The story tells about a young boy, Pasuya meeting a leopard named Cloud on a hunting trip. Pasuya brings Cloud back to his village and after Cloud saves Pasuya's grandmother from a snake attack, Cloud is accepted into the village and becomes one with the people, despite their being different species. On another hunting trip, Cloud meets her mother. After, Pasuya notices that Cloud is sad he lets her go back into the wild to join her mother.

I enjoy how Pasuya is persistent in proving that Cloud is worthy of being a part of his village. And, even though Cloud is being judged, she attacks the snake to save Pasuya's grandmother, proving to the rest of the people in the village that she will protect the people regardless of how they judge her.

I love the mixture of 2D characters and 3D backgrounds. Although this is stop motion animation, Ting Yuk Yuen still manages to zoom in out, giving us different perspectives. The costumes match those of hunter and gatherer early civilizations. Some of the characters that are older are riddled with wrinkles and some gray hair.

This handcrafted, stop-motion animation has designated foregrounds, middle and backgrounds, showing the depth of the forest as if it was real. The music in the introduction is full of drum beats that reel in the viewer. The sound effects when Pasuya is cooking dinner with Cloud are very realistic.

It is so beautiful to see the growth of Pasuya and Cloud's relationship. I love how two beings from two different worlds can meet and become best friends. This video shows the relationship between a human and an animal, and how they can become best friends, despite being able to communicate with words. I really enjoyed the moment when the baby leopard meets its mother during the hunting trip. It shows how if two people are meant to meet, then they will. Everything happens for a reason.

Sometimes the most difficult feeling to cope with is coming to terms with the idea that people you think will be in your life forever do not always stay around. Perhaps a friendship you have for two years was only meant to last for those two years. Even though we may want to hold onto that friendship, those people have grown differently and we no longer need each other in our lives. The adage "if you love someone or something, set it free" may sound trivial, but it is applicable here. This film does have some scenes of acts of violence and some negative behavior. There is some fighting between the animals, but it truly is not gory or bloody. There is also the explanation of gender roles which would be considered unacceptable to our audiences telling how women do the cleaning and cooking, meanwhile the men carry heavy things. The dialogue is in Chinese with English subtitles.

I give this film 4.5 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 8 to 12. It is a beautiful story about accepting others that are different from you. If we teach children at a young age not to hate people or things that are different from them, what a difference it would make in our world. This video discusses spiritual ancestral topics that early civilizations used to worship and this may differ from your own spiritual or religious beliefs.
Runtime: 9 minutes Juror Recommended Age: 5-12 Suggested Retail Price: $ Media: VIDEO



This title is in the KIDS FIRST! Film Festival - it may not be a regular, endorsed title
MARBLES (2022)
MARBLES (2022) - KYLE LAWRENCE
Series: INDIE SHORT, AGES 12-18
Description - Adam's mom routinely helps Adam hone his superpowers while teaching him how to be a superhero. He learns a valuable lessons while doing one of his most frequent exercises - "Marbles".
KIDS FIRST!® Adult Jurors say - I love this film. It's a perfect fit for KIDS FIRST! Marbles is a very interesting and engaging story with a superhero element.

The storyline follows a kid named Adam who has a superpower of super speed and his mom helps him hone his superpowers, while teaching him how to be a superhero. He learns a valuable lesson while doing an exercise with marbles where he has to catch all the marbles before they hit the ground and then, she ups it up by having him do the same thing without using his sight.

The storyline is very engaging as we watch the character doing his superhero training with the marbles. The camerawork and editing are all excellent. The way they create the illusion of Adam moving at super-fast speed is well executed; it is so believable. Lighting, visuals, sound - all contribute to an excellent production. What I really love though, is the relationship between the mom and the boy, Adam. She clearly has a handle on how to train him to use his superpower and, in the end congratulates him for "solving the impossible." The ending, when the dad speaks up, leads us to think there might be a sequel. I hope so.

The message of this short film is that, even though things may seem impossible, there is always a way.

I give Marbles 5 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 5 through 18, plus adults. By Avalon N. and Julie S., KIDS FIRST!
KIDS FIRST!® Kid Jurors say - I love this film. It's a perfect fit for KIDS FIRST! Marbles is a very interesting and engaging story with a superhero element.

The storyline follows a kid named Adam who has a superpower of super speed and his mom helps him hone his superpowers, while teaching him how to be a superhero. He learns a valuable lesson while doing an exercise with marbles where he has to catch all the marbles before they hit the ground and then, she ups it up by having him do the same thing without using his sight.

The storyline is very engaging as we watch the character doing his superhero training with the marbles. The camerawork and editing are all excellent. The way they create the illusion of Adam moving at super-fast speed is well executed; it is so believable. Lighting, visuals, sound - all contribute to an excellent production. What I really love though, is the relationship between the mom and the boy, Adam. She clearly has a handle on how to train him to use his superpower and, in the end congratulates him for "solving the impossible." The ending, when the dad speaks up, leads us to think there might be a sequel. I hope so.

The message of this short film is that, even though things may seem impossible, there is always a way.

I give Marbles 5 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 5 through 18, plus adults. By Avalon N. and Julie S., KIDS FIRST!
Runtime: 7 minutes Juror Recommended Age: 12-18 Suggested Retail Price: $ Media: VIDEO



This title is in the KIDS FIRST! Film Festival - it may not be a regular, endorsed title
DILEMMA, THE: EXTRA-CURRICULAR INSTITUTIONS IN CHINA
DILEMMA, THE: EXTRA-CURRICULAR INSTITUTIONS IN CHINA - HUANSHUO WANG
Series: STUDENT DOCUMENTARY, AGES 12-18
Description - China now has over 200,000 extra-curricular institutions, and extracurricular education has become an important part of Chinese students' study and life. However, its commercial nature, training mode, and teaching method have been controversial in society. This documentary focuses on the current situation of extracurricular education in Shenzhen and deeply discusses the development status and essence of extracurricular education in China through interviews with students and teachers.
KIDS FIRST!® Adult Jurors say - The Dilemma: Extra-Curricular Institutions offers a very interesting insight to education in China. I enjoyed learning about their educational culture.

This documentary was made by a high school student in China and shows the various activities available for Chinese students, discussing the benefits vs. the negatives of such learning. China has over 200,000 extra-curricular institutions, and extracurricular education is now an important part of Chinese students' life. However, its commercial nature, training mode and teaching method are controversial.

I like that the film clearly examines the various options and reasons for attending classes such as these, as well as the pressures on students that choose to participate or determine they are not suited for them. The film cleverly addresses both sides of the dialogue and concern. The camera work is good, as is the audio recording. There are sometimes some lighting issues. The interviews, from teachers and students are well filmed and easy to view. English subtitles are used when the people are speaking Chinese. We hear both teachers and students express their points of view and they seem to be expressing real opinions. There are plenty of locations and visuals to illustrate the discussion. The music played during the ending credits works very well.

The order in which the film is presented makes sense, although at times it feels a bit repetitious and drags for the viewer. I like the passion of the educators for teaching not only educational skills but life skills as well.

The message of the film is: think before you do something. Ask yourself if you are doing it for the right reasons or only because others are doing the same.

I give The Dilemma: Extra-Curricular Institutions 3.5 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 12 to 18, plus adults. By Richard L., KIDS FIRST!
KIDS FIRST!® Kid Jurors say - The Dilemma: Extra-Curricular Institutions offers a very interesting insight to education in China. I enjoyed learning about their educational culture.

This documentary was made by a high school student in China and shows the various activities available for Chinese students, discussing the benefits vs. the negatives of such learning. China has over 200,000 extra-curricular institutions, and extracurricular education is now an important part of Chinese students' life. However, its commercial nature, training mode and teaching method are controversial.

I like that the film clearly examines the various options and reasons for attending classes such as these, as well as the pressures on students that choose to participate or determine they are not suited for them. The film cleverly addresses both sides of the dialogue and concern. The camera work is good, as is the audio recording. There are sometimes some lighting issues. The interviews, from teachers and students are well filmed and easy to view. English subtitles are used when the people are speaking Chinese. We hear both teachers and students express their points of view and they seem to be expressing real opinions. There are plenty of locations and visuals to illustrate the discussion. The music played during the ending credits works very well.

The order in which the film is presented makes sense, although at times it feels a bit repetitious and drags for the viewer. I like the passion of the educators for teaching not only educational skills but life skills as well.

The message of the film is: think before you do something. Ask yourself if you are doing it for the right reasons or only because others are doing the same.

I give The Dilemma: Extra-Curricular Institutions 3.5 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 12 to 18, plus adults. By Richard L., KIDS FIRST!
Runtime: 15 minutes Juror Recommended Age: 12-18 Suggested Retail Price: $ Media: VIDEO



This title is in the KIDS FIRST! Film Festival - it may not be a regular, endorsed title
SEA NEVER FORGETS, THE
SEA NEVER FORGETS, THE - THOMAS PACE
Series: INDIESHORT, AGES 6-16
Description - An old man tells his grandson an unbelievable story from his life as a much younger man.
KIDS FIRST!® Adult Jurors say - The Sea Never Forgets is a lovely short film about three men, the sea and beautiful endings. The relationship between the dad, his son and the grandfather is sure to make you smile, as it did me.

The storyline follows three generations of men - Dad, son and Grandpa - as they take off on a fishing trip together that ends with an unexpected a plot twist.

The storyline is well developed and, although a fantasy, quite believable. The camerawork is excellent, as is the audio. The beach location provides a perfect background to play out this story. The background music, although sparingly used, makes a positive impact at the opening and closing of the film. The actors are perfectly cast and their performances are quite believable. My favorite is the grandfather, who is teetering on the edge of dementia. The father's concern for his dad is something that anyone who has dealt with an aging relative can relate to. When the grandfather shares his ocean rescue story with his grandson, the visuals are simple, but effective. We are brought right into his memory as we relive his dream - his dream of being rescued by a mysterious mermaid in the water. The younger boy serves as a conduit between his dad and granddad. This short film has some well-known actors in it - Shara McGlinn (Chicago Fire) and Brian Healy (Chicago Fire). The director's son, Tristan Pace, plays the young boy, Jack.

The message of this story is to believe in your dreams, even if they take years to manifest.

I give The Sea Never Forgets 4.5 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 10 to 18. Julie S., KIDS FIRST!
KIDS FIRST!® Kid Jurors say - I liked The Sea Never Forgets for making me think about the idea that stories our parents or grandparents tell us may not be all that crazy after all. It makes you think about how we may treat people that have experiences we do not understand. Plus I love that there is a mermaid in it.

The story follows a grandfather, father and son who go fishing at their favorite place on the ocean. The grandfather forgets something and the father goes back to get it; disturbed that his dad is so forgetful. He even forgets to put bait on his hook and insists that he did. Then the grandfather suddenly is attracted by something in the water and goes out into the water after it. The father rescues him and brings him back to the beach, leaving him with his son while he bring the truck. While he is away the grandfather wants to tell his grandson about something that happened to him years ago, but is worried that his grandson will think that it's a crazy story and won't believe him. HIs grandson tells his grandfather that he has never lied to him, so he will believe him. When the father returns he knows that his son has heard the story and they seem concerned for the grandfather who seems to be living in his own world.

I like that the Grandfather's story seems unbelievable, it turned out to have some merit to it. It really makes you think about how we choose to trust and believe in others. I enjoyed the way that cinematography takes us along on this family's fishing trip. The costumes are perfect for a day of fishing and they all look comfortable. I enjoyed the short hike through the leafy woods that they took to the fishing spot at the ocean. The music helps move the story along without overtaking it. For the flashback scenes, it was great to see what the grandfather went through when he was younger. In the flashback scene, the special effects are not very clear, but you still get the idea of what happened. This is the weakest part visually. I like the ending.

The message is that, although it may be hard to believe fantastic stories told by our parents or grandparents, our trust in them may help show us their truth.

I give The Sea Never Forgets 4 out of 5 stars and it for ages 5 to 18, plus adults. It is nice to see a story about three generations - a grandfather, father and son sharing a day together. And the grandfather sharing his unbelievable story with his grandson, even though his son never believed it, is cool. Reviewed by Madeleine H., KIDS FIRST!
Runtime: 13 minutes Juror Recommended Age: 6-16 Suggested Retail Price: $ Media: VIDEO



This title is in the KIDS FIRST! Film Festival - it may not be a regular, endorsed title
LIAM BUTLER AND HIS FRIENDS: NEW KID ON THE BLOCK
LIAM BUTLER AND HIS FRIENDS: NEW KID ON THE BLOCK - LIAM BUTLER
Series: STUDENT SHORT, AGES 5-12
Description - A young animator is drawn into his animated world, and has musical adventures with an imaginative cast of characters across Liamland, and the multiverse. When faced with a challenge, "there's nothing a little imagination can't fix!"

This is the second episode in the series. Episode one, "Liam Goes To Liamland" was selected by six festivals in 2021/2022, including: Children's Film Festival Seattle, KIDS FIRST!, A-Film Teens Fest, FIFES Comedy Festival, Anmtm! Online Animation Awards, and was a finalist in Teens of LA Film Fest.
KIDS FIRST!® Adult Jurors say - I really liked this animated, educational video. Liam Butler and His Friends: New Kid on the Block shows great ingenuity and talent, plus a good understanding of how kids learn.

The story follows Liam's friend, Morsecube, who suffers an injury to his translator and must go to Professor Rainey to get fixed. On their way back, they stop by Alphabet Universe.

The imaginative approach to kids helping kids and the idea that nothing is impossible is encouraging for kids trying to learn their basics. Professor Rainey's statement that "there's nothing a little imagination can't fix" is a great theme and readies little viewers for more adventures in learning.

The animation is pretty solid. It shows an understanding of set-up, scene structure and transitions. The introductory theme song is a little fast and challenging to get into. The "Morsecube You're Misunderstood" sequence is heartfelt and I love the drama Liam brings to the song. The Alphabet sequence should probably go a little slower; it would be helpful if the little fly-out images on each letter were larger and on screen a little longer.

The backgrounds work well, providing colorful and cohesive backdrops for the scenes. The music is very inventive and I like that it is sung with a young person's voice rather than something slick and announcer-y. The opening theme song is a bit fast and difficult to catch all the different aspects of it. It would be nice to get a longer visual so we have a few seconds more to get the joke.

This whole animation is a fun trip into a visual animated style that young kids can relate to. Minecraft comes to mind. Liam (played by Liam) takes the lead and proves to carry the heart line of the story. His heartfelt song to Morsecube proves that friendship means helping them, even if it means a trip through time. Professor Rainey is also appropriately authoritative without being too grown-up. The singer/narrator of the alphabet sequence is fun and appropriately energetic.

The complexity of developing animated stories -- from the design of the characters and the action, to the story and the development of the songs and the educational priority in what is, in essence, an eight minute musical - requires a strong collaboration amongst the artists. It is obvious that this team is on track with their vision, understanding their technology and the requirements for making an engaging, educational segment. Of course, it has to be the Morsecube song that Liam sings. It is the underlying heart of the story and shows us that educational material can and should be engaging and emotionally appealing. I love the clenched fist and the closed eyes when he assures Morsecube that he'll take care of him. The drama is great. This series would be best shown on virtual screening and that's what it appears to be designed for. The film's message is that learning is life. It never stops and you never know when you might end up in a whole new world. The development of learning tools that engage kids, maintain their attention and provide a reliable friend who guides you through, is an important element in childhood education. It is a part of re-visualizing educational material so it doesn't bore young learners - and that is definitely - or should be - of special interest to all parents and educators.

I give Liam Butler and His Friends: New Kid on the Block 4.5 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 5 to 12, perhaps older, and certainly adults. Reviewed by Chris T., KIDS FIRST!
KIDS FIRST!® Kid Jurors say - I really liked this animated, educational video. Liam Butler and His Friends: New Kid on the Block shows great ingenuity and talent, plus a good understanding of how kids learn.

The story follows Liam's friend, Morsecube, who suffers an injury to his translator and must go to Professor Rainey to get fixed. On their way back, they stop by Alphabet Universe.

The imaginative approach to kids helping kids and the idea that nothing is impossible is encouraging for kids trying to learn their basics. Professor Rainey's statement that "there's nothing a little imagination can't fix" is a great theme and readies little viewers for more adventures in learning.

The animation is pretty solid. It shows an understanding of set-up, scene structure and transitions. The introductory theme song is a little fast and challenging to get into. The "Morsecube You're Misunderstood" sequence is heartfelt and I love the drama Liam brings to the song. The Alphabet sequence should probably go a little slower; it would be helpful if the little fly-out images on each letter were larger and on screen a little longer.

The backgrounds work well, providing colorful and cohesive backdrops for the scenes. The music is very inventive and I like that it is sung with a young person's voice rather than something slick and announcer-y. The opening theme song is a bit fast and difficult to catch all the different aspects of it. It would be nice to get a longer visual so we have a few seconds more to get the joke.

This whole animation is a fun trip into a visual animated style that young kids can relate to. Minecraft comes to mind. Liam (played by Liam) takes the lead and proves to carry the heart line of the story. His heartfelt song to Morsecube proves that friendship means helping them, even if it means a trip through time. Professor Rainey is also appropriately authoritative without being too grown-up. The singer/narrator of the alphabet sequence is fun and appropriately energetic.

The complexity of developing animated stories -- from the design of the characters and the action, to the story and the development of the songs and the educational priority in what is, in essence, an eight minute musical - requires a strong collaboration amongst the artists. It is obvious that this team is on track with their vision, understanding their technology and the requirements for making an engaging, educational segment. Of course, it has to be the Morsecube song that Liam sings. It is the underlying heart of the story and shows us that educational material can and should be engaging and emotionally appealing. I love the clenched fist and the closed eyes when he assures Morsecube that he'll take care of him. The drama is great. This series would be best shown on virtual screening and that's what it appears to be designed for. The film's message is that learning is life. It never stops and you never know when you might end up in a whole new world. The development of learning tools that engage kids, maintain their attention and provide a reliable friend who guides you through, is an important element in childhood education. It is a part of re-visualizing educational material so it doesn't bore young learners - and that is definitely - or should be - of special interest to all parents and educators.

I give Liam Butler and His Friends: New Kid on the Block 4.5 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 5 to 12, perhaps older, and certainly adults. Reviewed by Chris T., KIDS FIRST!
Runtime: 8 minutes Juror Recommended Age: 5-12 Suggested Retail Price: $ Media: VIDEO



This title is in the KIDS FIRST! Film Festival - it may not be a regular, endorsed title
MAJOR TOM
MAJOR TOM - SCOTT A. GALESKI
Series: STUDENT SHORT, AGES 10-15
Description - A young teen (Thomas) who tries to stay away from the dangers of a rough life, imagines he is an astronaut to escape his reality. But the more he struggles on earth, he finds himself lost in outer space.
KIDS FIRST!® Adult Jurors say - Major Tom is an excellent film that truly moved me. The tone of the presentation and the background music portrays how the character really feels. It is deeply relatable and has some nicely depicted messages that brings forth the reality the internal struggles that some people are experiencing right now.

The student produced short film shows a young teen, Tom, who has tries to escape from the dangers of a rough life by imagining he is an astronaut for NASA. In four minutes, we witness different aspects of Tom's life as he struggles to find himself while seeing and hearing about tragedies.

The film is deeply emotional, although the storyline isn't completely clear. It definitely conveys important details in the scenes we see. The cinematography is excellent, as is the audio. The close-ups of Tom floating in space make a huge impact, but also the shots of different cityscapes and Tom running on his own are also very moving. In addition, the outer space background is very cool and very realistic looking. David Bowie's song "Space Oddity" is featured and played throughout the entire film, except for one meaningful moment right before blackout at the end. Kudos to these student filmmakers for getting the rights to include this song as it really makes an impact; it enhances the story in every way. The most stunning visual effects are, of course, of Tom floating in space. The greenscreen work is almost seamless. Tom is played by Romeo Keyser and his subtle performances works perfectly for this role, setting a droll emotional tone for the film. My compliments to Kya Garner-Minnick for his direction, to the students of the Downtown Detroit Student Film Consortium for a superb screenplay, to Zachery Grew for the drone work and to everyone else that worked on it. It truly is a great group effort. I am so impressed with the work on these talented young people. I feel their pain and the desire to escape some of the horrors of contemporary urban life.

The message of the film is that we don't know what's going on in other people's lives. They could be struggling internally, as Tom is in this film. We should treasure the time we have with the people we love because anything could happen anytime. You should be aware that there are some scenes of implied acts of violence - a dead person, police officers shoving people - but, it's not bloody or gory.

I give Major Tom 4.5 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 12 to 18, plus adults. It brings out a lot of emotion and reveals things that some people might not know is going on. By Kyla C. and Julie S., KIDS FIRST!
KIDS FIRST!® Kid Jurors say - Major Tom is an excellent film that truly moved me. The tone of the presentation and the background music portrays how the character really feels. It is deeply relatable and has some nicely depicted messages that brings forth the reality the internal struggles that some people are experiencing right now.

The student produced short film shows a young teen, Tom, who has tries to escape from the dangers of a rough life by imagining he is an astronaut for NASA. In four minutes, we witness different aspects of Tom's life as he struggles to find himself while seeing and hearing about tragedies.

The film is deeply emotional, although the storyline isn't completely clear. It definitely conveys important details in the scenes we see. The cinematography is excellent, as is the audio. The close-ups of Tom floating in space make a huge impact, but also the shots of different cityscapes and Tom running on his own are also very moving. In addition, the outer space background is very cool and very realistic looking. David Bowie's song "Space Oddity" is featured and played throughout the entire film, except for one meaningful moment right before blackout at the end. Kudos to these student filmmakers for getting the rights to include this song as it really makes an impact; it enhances the story in every way. The most stunning visual effects are, of course, of Tom floating in space. The greenscreen work is almost seamless. Tom is played by Romeo Keyser and his subtle performances works perfectly for this role, setting a droll emotional tone for the film. My compliments to Kya Garner-Minnick for his direction, to the students of the Downtown Detroit Student Film Consortium for a superb screenplay, to Zachery Grew for the drone work and to everyone else that worked on it. It truly is a great group effort. I am so impressed with the work on these talented young people. I feel their pain and the desire to escape some of the horrors of contemporary urban life.

The message of the film is that we don't know what's going on in other people's lives. They could be struggling internally, as Tom is in this film. We should treasure the time we have with the people we love because anything could happen anytime. You should be aware that there are some scenes of implied acts of violence - a dead person, police officers shoving people - but, it's not bloody or gory.

I give Major Tom 4.5 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 12 to 18, plus adults. It brings out a lot of emotion and reveals things that some people might not know is going on. By Kyla C. and Julie S., KIDS FIRST!
Runtime: 5 minutes Juror Recommended Age: 12-18 Suggested Retail Price: $ Media: VIDEO



This title is in the KIDS FIRST! Film Festival - it may not be a regular, endorsed title
EXPEDITION
EXPEDITION - SCOTT A. GALESKI
Series: STUDENT SHORT, AGES 12-18
Description - Aliens come to planet Earth and witness its demise ...
KIDS FIRST!® Adult Jurors say - Expedition is a short student made film, by high school students, that shows a view of our planet which is none too inspiring. It makes you think about what an alien who visited here might actually think about our planet and how we have neglected taking care of it.

The storyline follows aliens that come to planet Earth and witness its demise.

The visuals of this film are the story. Two young men arrive on earth on a space ship that looks like a rock. Dressed identically, they observe some of the decaying buildings on this planet - factories, housing, electrical power stations - all of which show a civilization breaking down. There is only one image of a snow covered field that shows anything of nature. There is no dialogue, not commentary, only one image after another and, in the end, they simply depart on their rocklike spaceship. The visuals are well shot. The editing is seamless. The background music is hauntingly poignant. Created by Noah Harrison, performed by Romeo Keyser and Matthew Wilson, directed by Milo Smith and with an original score by Benjamin Harrison.

The message of this film is to look at our planet from the eyes of an outsider and notice what it might look like in those eyes.

I give Expedition 4 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 12 to 18, plus adults. Reviewed by Julie S., KIDS FIRST!
KIDS FIRST!® Kid Jurors say - Expedition is a short student made film, by high school students, that shows a view of our planet which is none too inspiring. It makes you think about what an alien who visited here might actually think about our planet and how we have neglected taking care of it.

The storyline follows aliens that come to planet Earth and witness its demise.

The visuals of this film are the story. Two young men arrive on earth on a space ship that looks like a rock. Dressed identically, they observe some of the decaying buildings on this planet - factories, housing, electrical power stations - all of which show a civilization breaking down. There is only one image of a snow covered field that shows anything of nature. There is no dialogue, not commentary, only one image after another and, in the end, they simply depart on their rocklike spaceship. The visuals are well shot. The editing is seamless. The background music is hauntingly poignant. Created by Noah Harrison, performed by Romeo Keyser and Matthew Wilson, directed by Milo Smith and with an original score by Benjamin Harrison.

The message of this film is to look at our planet from the eyes of an outsider and notice what it might look like in those eyes.

I give Expedition 4 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 12 to 18, plus adults. Reviewed by Julie S., KIDS FIRST!
Runtime: 3 minutes Juror Recommended Age: 12-18 Suggested Retail Price: $ Media: VIDEO



This title is in the KIDS FIRST! Film Festival - it may not be a regular, endorsed title
DIFFERENT
DIFFERENT - SCOTT A. GALESKI
Series: STUDENT SHORT, AGES 10-18
Description - A seventh grade student shares his feeling about being different.
KIDS FIRST!® Adult Jurors say - Short, sweet and to the point. This kid feel different
KIDS FIRST!® Kid Jurors say - Short, sweet and to the point. This kid feel different.
Runtime: 2 minutes Juror Recommended Age: 10-18 Suggested Retail Price: $ Media: VIDEO


This title is in the KIDS FIRST! Film Festival - it may not be a regular, endorsed title
HONK
HONK - WOW FILMS
Series: DOCUMENTARY, AGES 7-18
Description - Dumped and alone at a city park, Honk spends his days dodging cars, begging for food and looking for friends. When Cheryl and Honk's path cross unexpectedly, what follows is a story in which fairy tales are made. During an unprecedented time of lock downs and social distancing, this unlikely pair turn to each other for companionship. After Cheryl shares videos of their unusual friendship on social media, Honk becomes an overnight sensation. News and other media outlets share his story which results in people all over the world becoming invested in his well-being. Cheryl soon learns why Honk is alone and the two embark on an uncertain journey together. With close to 80K followers on Instagram, he has become a much needed symbol of hope, friendship and love during a time of overwhelming struggle and loss for so many.?
KIDS FIRST!® Adult Jurors say - Honk is incredibly sweet and heartwarming documentary. The subjects are interesting and the story is exciting, due to its oddness. I thoroughly enjoyed it.

The story follows a woman who forms a friendship with a goose during the pandemic and ends up getting over 80K followers on Instagram.

Cheryl's story of meeting this goose during the pandemic is so unexpected and slightly crazy. The idea that she met Honk the good during a time when we were all social distancing and formed a relationship with him is endearing - both of them needed a friend, someone to be with. The cinematography is very good, keeping things exciting while also staying simple. A lot of this film is filmed on a cell phone, which works just fine. I love the locations, especially those at the park. And I like how Cheryl added little hearts on the side of her phone videos - which worked particularly well for attracting attention on social media. Her videos on social media are absolutely adorable. This story is so unusual, and Cheryl's motivations are honest and pure. When someone tells her that he must be a domestic goose, not a wild one, she is concerned about returning him to an appropriate environment and feels that she needs to find his mate. Honk is a character in his own right as well, something not always explored in the usual animal documentaries. Honk is the best "pandemic pal" a girl could ask for. He's safe, he's devoted to her, and he has a charming personality. There are some sad aspects to this documentary, such as when Honk dies two years later which Cheryl tells Honk's social media followers on Instagram, accompanied by sad music and clips of better times.

The message of this film is about the importance of bringing love and hope into people's lives - whether through a human or non-human. If you show love, you get love!

I give Honk 4.5 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 8 to 18, plus adults. Bring your tissues because Honk's passing is a reminder to us all how life is eternal. By Sandrine A. and Julie S., KIDS FIRST!
KIDS FIRST!® Kid Jurors say - Honk is incredibly sweet and heartwarming documentary. The subjects are interesting and the story is exciting, due to its oddness. I thoroughly enjoyed it.

The story follows a woman who forms a friendship with a goose during the pandemic and ends up getting over 80K followers on Instagram.

Cheryl's story of meeting this goose during the pandemic is so unexpected and slightly crazy. The idea that she met Honk the good during a time when we were all social distancing and formed a relationship with him is endearing - both of them needed a friend, someone to be with. The cinematography is very good, keeping things exciting while also staying simple. A lot of this film is filmed on a cell phone, which works just fine. I love the locations, especially those at the park. And I like how Cheryl added little hearts on the side of her phone videos - which worked particularly well for attracting attention on social media. Her videos on social media are absolutely adorable. This story is so unusual, and Cheryl's motivations are honest and pure. When someone tells her that he must be a domestic goose, not a wild one, she is concerned about returning him to an appropriate environment and feels that she needs to find his mate. Honk is a character in his own right as well, something not always explored in the usual animal documentaries. Honk is the best "pandemic pal" a girl could ask for. He's safe, he's devoted to her, and he has a charming personality. There are some sad aspects to this documentary, such as when Honk dies two years later which Cheryl tells Honk's social media followers on Instagram, accompanied by sad music and clips of better times.

The message of this film is about the importance of bringing love and hope into people's lives - whether through a human or non-human. If you show love, you get love!

I give Honk 4.5 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 8 to 18, plus adults. Bring your tissues because Honk's passing is a reminder to us all how life is eternal. By Sandrine A. and Julie S., KIDS FIRST!
Runtime: 46 minutes Juror Recommended Age: 7-18 Suggested Retail Price: $ Media: VIDEO



This title is in the KIDS FIRST! Film Festival - it may not be a regular, endorsed title
SANTA DOESN'T NEED YOUR HELP
SANTA DOESN'T NEED YOUR HELP - KEVIN MAHER
Series: INDIE SHORT, AGES 4-12
Description - It's the night before Christmas - and Santa is tired of other people saving the holiday. So, Santa sets out to prove himself, even if it kills him! What follows is a laugh-out-loud adventure about refusing to accept help.
KIDS FIRST!® Adult Jurors say - I love the short film Santa Doesn't Need Your Help. It is super funny. My two favorite parts are when Santa loses his reindeer and when he can't get though the chimney.

The story is about Santa who is unhappy when he is offered help to deliver presents. After a long, challenging night he rethinks the offers.

This a filmed storybook told through a series of drawings by Joe Dator, whose work you might know from The New Yorker. The camera pans right and left, up and down on the drawings, giving us a varied as it does that. The story line is funny and meaningful. The main character, Santa, blossoms from starting out as a grumpy old guy to accepting himself at the end. He emerges like a butterfly from its cocoon. The film is created by a series of drawings, which I don't usually like, but these are so detailed and so much fun and fanciful, plus they really deliver the story well. The narration is by Glen Heroy who has been playing Santa Claus for nearly 40 years. The script is a poem in iambic pentameter, similar to the classic "The Night Before Christmas" poem. The images are all so detailed. When Santa goes around the world the locations look quite real. If you look closely the images have layers of things on top of each other which makes them look realistic. For example, when Santa is riding on his sleigh, he appears to be closer and the sky is farther away. There is a smidgen of background music here and there, but mostly the only sounds are of the narrator speaking. We meet the narrator at the beginning, dressed in a red sweater with a Nordic pattern that matches the story very well. That is the only time we see the narrator. My absolute favorite part is when Santa yells at the K-pop stars because they say that his belly jiggles -- that is supper funny.

The message of this film is that it is okay that you can't do things and need to ask for help.

I give Santa Doesn't Need Your Help 4 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 4 to 12, plus adults. Families will enjoy this so much. By Madeleine H. and Julie S., KIDS FIRST!
KIDS FIRST!® Kid Jurors say - I love the short film Santa Doesn't Need Your Help. It is super funny. My two favorite parts are when Santa loses his reindeer and when he can't get though the chimney.

The story is about Santa who is unhappy when he is offered help to deliver presents. After a long, challenging night he rethinks the offers.

This a filmed storybook told through a series of drawings by Joe Dator, whose work you might know from The New Yorker. The camera pans right and left, up and down on the drawings, giving us a varied as it does that. The story line is funny and meaningful. The main character, Santa, blossoms from starting out as a grumpy old guy to accepting himself at the end. He emerges like a butterfly from its cocoon. The film is created by a series of drawings, which I don't usually like, but these are so detailed and so much fun and fanciful, plus they really deliver the story well. The narration is by Glen Heroy who has been playing Santa Claus for nearly 40 years. The script is a poem in iambic pentameter, similar to the classic "The Night Before Christmas" poem. The images are all so detailed. When Santa goes around the world the locations look quite real. If you look closely the images have layers of things on top of each other which makes them look realistic. For example, when Santa is riding on his sleigh, he appears to be closer and the sky is farther away. There is a smidgen of background music here and there, but mostly the only sounds are of the narrator speaking. We meet the narrator at the beginning, dressed in a red sweater with a Nordic pattern that matches the story very well. That is the only time we see the narrator. My absolute favorite part is when Santa yells at the K-pop stars because they say that his belly jiggles -- that is supper funny.

The message of this film is that it is okay that you can't do things and need to ask for help.

I give Santa Doesn't Need Your Help 4 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 4 to 12, plus adults. Families will enjoy this so much. By Madeleine H. and Julie S., KIDS FIRST!
Runtime: 10 minutes Juror Recommended Age: 4-12 Suggested Retail Price: $ Media: VIDEO



This title is in the KIDS FIRST! Film Festival - it may not be a regular, endorsed title
I AM NOBODY
I AM NOBODY - NATHAN KONTNY
Series: INDIE SHORT, AGES 5-12
Description - We often feel like nobodies. I had that feeling going into this experiment where my daughter and I tested for lead in Chicago's public water fountains. What could we possibly do to fix a bad situation?
KIDS FIRST!® Adult Jurors say - Okey dokey, I officially love this guy and his daughter. Watching the two of them tackle a "save the city of Chicago" project on one afternoon - the last day of the daughter's summer vacation is nothing short of awe-inspiring for those of us who love to see dads interacting with their kids, especially on an important environmental project.

The story is about how easy it is to feel disempowered in today's world, but one man decides to undertake an experiment where, together with his young daughter they test for lead in Chicago's public water fountains. What could we possibly do to fix a bad situation?

his is a very well shot, fast-paced documentary with lots of locations, camera angles, dedicated people, good background music and humor. Nathan Kontny, the filmmaker (dressed in graphic T-shirts), and his young daughter (dressed in Rainbow colors) undertake a serious pursuit to determine what lead content is in Chicago's public water systems. We follow them to the store where they spend $100 on lead testing kids, to four public fountains to obtain water samples, to their home kitchen where the actual testing takes place. Fun graphics are used to make transitions between scenes. The daughter plays an integral role in this project, notably when she carefully handles the dropper and test tubes. We watch him and his family in their family home and see their passion for this issue. The Father/daughter relationship is precious; spending the last day of her summer vacation with her dad working on this project - priceless! Their next project: how to save the city of Chicago! I can't wait to see it.

The message of this film is - yes, you can! You can tackle city hall! You can make a difference! Just do it!

I give I am Nobody 5 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 5 to 18, plus adults and grandparents. By Julie S., KIDS FIRST!
KIDS FIRST!® Kid Jurors say - Okey dokey, I officially love this guy and his daughter. Watching the two of them tackle a "save the city of Chicago" project on one afternoon - the last day of the daughter's summer vacation is nothing short of awe-inspiring for those of us who love to see dads interacting with their kids, especially on an important environmental project.

The story is about how easy it is to feel disempowered in today's world, but one man decides to undertake an experiment where, together with his young daughter they test for lead in Chicago's public water fountains. What could we possibly do to fix a bad situation?

his is a very well shot, fast-paced documentary with lots of locations, camera angles, dedicated people, good background music and humor. Nathan Kontny, the filmmaker (dressed in graphic T-shirts), and his young daughter (dressed in Rainbow colors) undertake a serious pursuit to determine what lead content is in Chicago's public water systems. We follow them to the store where they spend $100 on lead testing kids, to four public fountains to obtain water samples, to their home kitchen where the actual testing takes place. Fun graphics are used to make transitions between scenes. The daughter plays an integral role in this project, notably when she carefully handles the dropper and test tubes. We watch him and his family in their family home and see their passion for this issue. The Father/daughter relationship is precious; spending the last day of her summer vacation with her dad working on this project - priceless! Their next project: how to save the city of Chicago! I can't wait to see it.

The message of this film is - yes, you can! You can tackle city hall! You can make a difference! Just do it!

I give I am Nobody 5 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 5 to 18, plus adults and grandparents. By Julie S., KIDS FIRST!
Runtime: 6 minutes Juror Recommended Age: 5-12 Suggested Retail Price: $ Media: VIDEO



This title is in the KIDS FIRST! Film Festival - it may not be a regular, endorsed title
NEXT LEVEL, THE
NEXT LEVEL, THE - NADEJ WPI
Series: INDIE SHORT, AGES 12-18
Description - Many people shine under pressure while others completely crumble. N�Dej is a teenage girl who is disposed to look on the bright side of things in spite of pessimistic thoughts that may get the best of her for a moment. When COVID-19 reached its peak, N�Dej reached her lowest. Her love for a challenge, and video games, has given her unrealistic expectations but a realistic way to take on her new reality. After convincing herself to take on a new attitude, she is motivated to overcome her persistent worries and become a stronger version of
KIDS FIRST!® Adult Jurors say - I thoroughly enjoyed this vibrantly animated short film. The Next Level explains how to turn things in life that may be negative into a positive. The comparison of the pandemic and a video game is an interesting take.

This short film compares the pandemic to a video game. The narrator describes the hardships of living through a pandemic by calling COVID "the expansion pack none of us ever wanted." N�Dej expresses her struggle with anxiety and how playing video games helped her cope with what was going on in the world during the pandemic. She was able to social distance, but still be close to her friends online.

I enjoyed how N�Dej compares her video game self to her real self. She explains how, in the video games she plays, her character has strength, agility, and power on level 148, whereas in reality she believes herself to be at level 2. But, she turns this negative into a positive by explaining that, even though she may see herself as a level 2, in reality, she is accomplishing and overcoming obstacles in life just like her character in the video game, hence leveling up in reality as well.

I love when N�Dej cracks a joke and the animation and music freezes. There are moments when N�Dej has the animation of herself and talks to the audience and then proceeds to show reenactments. It breaks up the video and helps it flow a little bit better. I like the different animated video game players. Their designs are intricate and show each character's personality. For example, one of the characters has a pink red heart on her cheek, indicating that she is most likely more feminine and caring. Meanwhile, the other character has a blue costume with piercings, accompanied with glowing designs that resemble tattoos, indicating that, that character is more hardcore. The backgrounds coincide with what the narrator is talking about in each scene. For example, when N�Dej describes how she felt when the pandemic first started, the background is of her animated self, very small, compared to the big earth, with a dark gray background. The music in the beginning is joyful and invites the audience in. The music enhances the emotion when the film shifts from the upbeat introduction to slower and quieter guitar strums when the narrator discusses the hardships she faced during the pandemic.

N�Dej's character development is evident in this film. She discusses how she felt severe anxiety when the pandemic began, but, with the help of her friends online and by immersing herself into video games, she leveled up not only her character in the game, but her real self as well. The audio is very crisp and the animation is very clean and easy on the eyes.

The message of this short film is that sometimes, immersing oneself into a positive hobby can be therapeutic, because it helps one take a break from reality. But, it is important to not get carried away and to keep things in balance.

I give this film 4.5 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 12 to 18. Since this film is created by someone between the ages of 12 and 18, the filmmaker appropriately explains the pandemic for younger audiences. By Tor F., KIDS FIRST!
KIDS FIRST!® Kid Jurors say - I thoroughly enjoyed this vibrantly animated short film. The Next Level explains how to turn things in life that may be negative into a positive. The comparison of the pandemic and a video game is an interesting take.

This short film compares the pandemic to a video game. The narrator describes the hardships of living through a pandemic by calling COVID "the expansion pack none of us ever wanted." N�Dej expresses her struggle with anxiety and how playing video games helped her cope with what was going on in the world during the pandemic. She was able to social distance, but still be close to her friends online.

I enjoyed how N�Dej compares her video game self to her real self. She explains how, in the video games she plays, her character has strength, agility, and power on level 148, whereas in reality she believes herself to be at level 2. But, she turns this negative into a positive by explaining that, even though she may see herself as a level 2, in reality, she is accomplishing and overcoming obstacles in life just like her character in the video game, hence leveling up in reality as well.

I love when N�Dej cracks a joke and the animation and music freezes. There are moments when N�Dej has the animation of herself and talks to the audience and then proceeds to show reenactments. It breaks up the video and helps it flow a little bit better. I like the different animated video game players. Their designs are intricate and show each character's personality. For example, one of the characters has a pink red heart on her cheek, indicating that she is most likely more feminine and caring. Meanwhile, the other character has a blue costume with piercings, accompanied with glowing designs that resemble tattoos, indicating that, that character is more hardcore. The backgrounds coincide with what the narrator is talking about in each scene. For example, when N�Dej describes how she felt when the pandemic first started, the background is of her animated self, very small, compared to the big earth, with a dark gray background. The music in the beginning is joyful and invites the audience in. The music enhances the emotion when the film shifts from the upbeat introduction to slower and quieter guitar strums when the narrator discusses the hardships she faced during the pandemic.

N�Dej's character development is evident in this film. She discusses how she felt severe anxiety when the pandemic began, but, with the help of her friends online and by immersing herself into video games, she leveled up not only her character in the game, but her real self as well. The audio is very crisp and the animation is very clean and easy on the eyes.

The message of this short film is that sometimes, immersing oneself into a positive hobby can be therapeutic, because it helps one take a break from reality. But, it is important to not get carried away and to keep things in balance.

I give this film 4.5 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 12 to 18. Since this film is created by someone between the ages of 12 and 18, the filmmaker appropriately explains the pandemic for younger audiences. By Tor F., KIDS FIRST!
Runtime: 8 minutes Juror Recommended Age: 12-18 Suggested Retail Price: $ Media: VIDEO



This title is in the KIDS FIRST! Film Festival - it may not be a regular, endorsed title
MIDLIFE CRISIS BAND
MIDLIFE CRISIS BAND - THOMAS FARM FILMS
Series: STUDENT SHORT, AGES 12 - 18
Description - If you aren't dead yet, keep rockin'! A group of burnt out middle aged friends decide to revive their high school rock band for an upcoming competition. After years of suburban living, do they still have what it takes?
KIDS FIRST!® Adult Jurors say - I love the comedy in Midlife Crisis Band. It's really fun seeing young kids portraying adults. This film is definitely funny and I love its message.

The story follows a group of tired and dissatisfied adults who decide to revive their high school rock band to compete in the local Battle of the Bands. What will their children and community think of this revival? You have to watch to find out!

What a fun short film. First of all, I love the premise of the story - that you're never too old to enjoy life. The writer and director, Asali Echols, really comes through with a winning combination of script and actors. The camerawork is very well done, very clear, well lit and steady. The costumes fit the story and I particularly like the costumes for the various band members and the makeup for the adult characters is terrific. The sets and locations work well. I really like the opening set at the lunch counter. The lyrics of the original score by Travis Cruse are terrific. All the band members look like they're enjoying the music and their roles, even though their music ability isn't all that great. The smoke during The Broken Scissors performance was unexpected and fun. I enjoyed the humor portrayed by Darryl (Joaquin Cervantes-Brewer) throughout the film. My favorite character and actor is the daughter of Bill Bailey. She is un-credited, but her transformation and her dedication to her father during The Battle of the Bands is great. Her character's expressions seem very real. My favorite scene is definitely The Battle of the Bands.

The message of this film is that you're never too old to enjoy life and pursue your dreams. As the character Bill Bailey states, "There is not a limit on fun in the world."

I give Midlife Crisis Band 4 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 8 to 18, plus adults.

It may remind parents to enjoy this time with their children as they watch the movie. By Selene W. and Julie S., KIDS FIRST!
KIDS FIRST!® Kid Jurors say - I love the comedy in Midlife Crisis Band. It's really fun seeing young kids portraying adults. This film is definitely funny and I love its message.

The story follows a group of tired and dissatisfied adults who decide to revive their high school rock band to compete in the local Battle of the Bands. What will their children and community think of this revival? You have to watch to find out!

What a fun short film. First of all, I love the premise of the story - that you're never too old to enjoy life. The writer and director, Asali Echols, really comes through with a winning combination of script and actors. The camerawork is very well done, very clear, well lit and steady. The costumes fit the story and I particularly like the costumes for the various band members and the makeup for the adult characters is terrific. The sets and locations work well. I really like the opening set at the lunch counter. The lyrics of the original score by Travis Cruse are terrific. All the band members look like they're enjoying the music and their roles, even though their music ability isn't all that great. The smoke during The Broken Scissors performance was unexpected and fun. I enjoyed the humor portrayed by Darryl (Joaquin Cervantes-Brewer) throughout the film. My favorite character and actor is the daughter of Bill Bailey. She is un-credited, but her transformation and her dedication to her father during The Battle of the Bands is great. Her character's expressions seem very real. My favorite scene is definitely The Battle of the Bands.

The message of this film is that you're never too old to enjoy life and pursue your dreams. As the character Bill Bailey states, "There is not a limit on fun in the world."

I give Midlife Crisis Band 4 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 8 to 18, plus adults.

It may remind parents to enjoy this time with their children as they watch the movie. By Selene W. and Julie S., KIDS FIRST!
Runtime: 14 minutes Juror Recommended Age: 12-18 Suggested Retail Price: $ Media: VIDEO



This title is in the KIDS FIRST! Film Festival - it may not be a regular, endorsed title
1 + 1 = 4221 (A MOCKUMENTARY)
1 + 1 = 4221 (A MOCKUMENTARY) - HARRY MAXON
Series: STUDENT SHORT, AGES 8-14
Description - Students write a wrong math equation on the board and things go wrong.
KIDS FIRST!® Adult Jurors say - I really like the short student film 1 + 1 = 4221 (A Mockumentary)! It is really funny how it keeps going back to the equation, teleporting kids into the teacher's bathroom, and even detention. The storyline is cute and clever and it's well executed.

The story begins with the students doing a math test. Their teacher leaves the room and tells them to stay in their seats, but one student goes to the board and writes the equation 1 + 1 = 4221. This equation curses everyone who reads it aloud, and things go amuck from there!

I love the storyline. It's original and well-written, especially for 6th grade students. It is funny, unpredictable and enjoyable to watch. For some reason, the equation makes the kids disappear and teleport into the teacher's bathroom. Why does the equation make them disappear? Why do their teachers fall in love? It's a mystery and, as a mockumentary, it is not supposed to make sense. It's comedic and the kids pull it off great! My hats off to creators Maddie, Brendan, Chris and Cater for coming up with an interesting and unique plotline. Plus, the quality of the camera work is quite good. It is supposed to look as if the students are being interviews, which is a clever idea. They are being interviewed after the anomaly happens. I love when the kids asked, "are you happy your teachers fell in love" and they all say, "no." The editing that makes it look as if the kids disappear is well done. There is not much in terms of background music except for some transitions and at the ending as it goes to the credits. My favorite parts are the responses to the question of what they think about their teachers being in love and the ending when everyone is repeating the equation and disappearing.

The film's message is: watch when you say random things as they might create an effect you didn't plan on.

I give 1 + 1 = 4221 (A Mockumentary 4.5 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 8 to 14, plus adults. This is exactly the type of film that fits our KIDS FIRST! Film Festivals. Reviewed by Sydney S., KIDS FIRST!
KIDS FIRST!® Kid Jurors say - I really like the short student film 1 + 1 = 4221 (A Mockumentary)! It is really funny how it keeps going back to the equation, teleporting kids into the teacher's bathroom, and even detention. The storyline is cute and clever and it's well executed.

The story begins with the students doing a math test. Their teacher leaves the room and tells them to stay in their seats, but one student goes to the board and writes the equation 1 + 1 = 4221. This equation curses everyone who reads it aloud, and things go amuck from there!

I love the storyline. It's original and well-written, especially for 6th grade students. It is funny, unpredictable and enjoyable to watch. For some reason, the equation makes the kids disappear and teleport into the teacher's bathroom. Why does the equation make them disappear? Why do their teachers fall in love? It's a mystery and, as a mockumentary, it is not supposed to make sense. It's comedic and the kids pull it off great! My hats off to creators Maddie, Brendan, Chris and Cater for coming up with an interesting and unique plotline. Plus, the quality of the camera work is quite good. It is supposed to look as if the students are being interviews, which is a clever idea. They are being interviewed after the anomaly happens. I love when the kids asked, "are you happy your teachers fell in love" and they all say, "no." The editing that makes it look as if the kids disappear is well done. There is not much in terms of background music except for some transitions and at the ending as it goes to the credits. My favorite parts are the responses to the question of what they think about their teachers being in love and the ending when everyone is repeating the equation and disappearing.

The film's message is: watch when you say random things as they might create an effect you didn't plan on.

I give 1 + 1 = 4221 (A Mockumentary 4.5 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 8 to 14, plus adults. This is exactly the type of film that fits our KIDS FIRST! Film Festivals. Reviewed by Sydney S., KIDS FIRST!
Runtime: 2 minutes Juror Recommended Age: 8-14 Suggested Retail Price: $ Media: VIDEO



This title is in the KIDS FIRST! Film Festival - it may not be a regular, endorsed title
SARA SNOW AND THE SEVEN DANCERS
SARA SNOW AND THE SEVEN DANCERS - WITH GRACE PRODUCTIONS
Series: STUDENT SHORT, AGES 12-18
Description - Classically trained ballerina, Sara Snow's unjust dismissal from her studio sets her on a path of reinvention and empowerment. Supported by her friend Mia, Sara is introduced to seven diverse dancers who help awaken her to the beauty in movement and self-expression. It is a film about self-discovery, breaking down barriers and stigmas, and self-acceptance.
KIDS FIRST!® Adult Jurors say - I really enjoy Sara Snow And The Seven Dancers. It is terrific! I like that it talks about something that is very important to know - bullying. Plus, it is a ballet film and the dancing is beautiful.

The storyline is about a girl named Sara (Andrea Matei) and her passion is ballet, but due to certain events, she discovers a passion for something else, which makes her discover that there is a way to include everything and turn it into one thing, plus pass it on to others.

Most importantly, I like the dancing. It is filled with emotion. Second, I like how they deal with bullying. The camerawork is quite good, with lots of angles that show the dancers in every capacity. The audio has some inconsistencies in volume and some background sounds, but it doesn't detract from the film. The film takes place mostly at the ballet studio. The background music is terrific and suits the film. The music makes me feel and understand what is going on inside the different characters' heads. Sara's character development is the focus here. At the beginning, she is sad and insecure and, as the story develops, she becomes stronger. The storyline is full of lessons we can all learn from. My favorite part is when Mia sings. It makes me feel happy. My favorite actor in the film is Andrea Matei - she�s a wonderful dancer and actress. After watching this film, I now search for her and am following her. I�m a big fan!

The message of this film is not to be sad when someone talks badly about you. We need to be strong, protect others and choose the right friends.

I give Sara Snow And The Seven Dancers 5 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 12 to 18. By Anna Clara B. and Julie S., KIDS FIRST!
KIDS FIRST!® Kid Jurors say - I really enjoy Sara Snow And The Seven Dancers. It is terrific! I like that it talks about something that is very important to know - bullying. Plus, it is a ballet film and the dancing is beautiful.

The storyline is about a girl named Sara (Andrea Matei) and her passion is ballet, but due to certain events, she discovers a passion for something else, which makes her discover that there is a way to include everything and turn it into one thing, plus pass it on to others.

Most importantly, I like the dancing. It is filled with emotion. Second, I like how they deal with bullying. The camerawork is quite good, with lots of angles that show the dancers in every capacity. The audio has some inconsistencies in volume and some background sounds, but it doesn't detract from the film. The film takes place mostly at the ballet studio. The background music is terrific and suits the film. The music makes me feel and understand what is going on inside the different characters' heads. Sara's character development is the focus here. At the beginning, she is sad and insecure and, as the story develops, she becomes stronger. The storyline is full of lessons we can all learn from. My favorite part is when Mia sings. It makes me feel happy. My favorite actor in the film is Andrea Matei - she�s a wonderful dancer and actress. After watching this film, I now search for her and am following her. I�m a big fan!

The message of this film is not to be sad when someone talks badly about you. We need to be strong, protect others and choose the right friends.

I give Sara Snow And The Seven Dancers 5 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 12 to 18. By Anna Clara B. and Julie S., KIDS FIRST!
Runtime: 20 minutes Juror Recommended Age: 12-18 Suggested Retail Price: $ Media: VIDEO



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