KIDS FIRST! has endorsed 1428 total Video titles

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This title is in the KIDS FIRST! Film Festival - it may not be a regular, endorsed title
CAR SERVICE, THE - MARK KIEFER
Series: INDIE SHORT, AGE 10-18
Description - They really don't make them like they used to.
KIDS FIRST!® Adult Jurors say - Charming and fun! The Car Service is a complete farce with comical tones, excellent conversations and facial expressions and an unexpected ending that you have no indication of until you get there. The conversation itself is funny and the ending makes it make sense. The last few seconds are what make this film appealing.

The storyline is about a man that calls an auto shop asking if they will check his car. A mechanic answers and gets annoyed by each question because they are redundant and unnecessary. He agrees to check the car, which we find out is not what we think it is.

The story follows the back and forth conversation between an annoyed mechanic and an irritating customer. The mechanic answers obvious and general questions that the customer, who thinks he knows better than the mechanic, asks. The conversation is pretty sarcastic on the part of the mechanic, and the customer seems overly demanding. When the mechanic speaks, there are two shots - one focuses on his expressions, and the other focuses on his background which shows that he is in an auto shop. When the customer speaks, there is only a shot of him from what seems to be a balcony with the view of a body of water, and mountains around it. There is no change in camera shots besides these. The costumes suit the time period and the characters. The tango music in the background enhances the comical tone of the film. There are only two characters. The customer talks at the beginning and end to an off-screen woman who he refers to first as darling and later as mommy, which I didn't quite get. The actors, Liam McNeil and Eddie Nason, both play their parts well and their facial expressions are on point. My favorite part is definitively the ending. It's unexpected and it makes the whole conversation questionable, which is funny after all the trouble both people went through.

It is sarcastic and funny and points out that what we hear is sometimes confusing with what is actually going on.

I give The Car Service 4 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 10 to 18, plus adults. Reviewed by David O. and Julie S., KIDS FIRST! Jurors
KIDS FIRST!® Kid Jurors say - Charming and fun! The Car Service is a complete farce with comical tones, excellent conversations and facial expressions and an unexpected ending that you have no indication of until you get there. The conversation itself is funny and the ending makes it make sense. The last few seconds are what make this film appealing.

The storyline is about a man that calls an auto shop asking if they will check his car. A mechanic answers and gets annoyed by each question because they are redundant and unnecessary. He agrees to check the car, which we find out is not what we think it is.

The story follows the back and forth conversation between an annoyed mechanic and an irritating customer. The mechanic answers obvious and general questions that the customer, who thinks he knows better than the mechanic, asks. The conversation is pretty sarcastic on the part of the mechanic, and the customer seems overly demanding. When the mechanic speaks, there are two shots - one focuses on his expressions, and the other focuses on his background which shows that he is in an auto shop. When the customer speaks, there is only a shot of him from what seems to be a balcony with the view of a body of water, and mountains around it. There is no change in camera shots besides these. The costumes suit the time period and the characters. The tango music in the background enhances the comical tone of the film. There are only two characters. The customer talks at the beginning and end to an off-screen woman who he refers to first as darling and later as mommy, which I didn't quite get. The actors, Liam McNeil and Eddie Nason, both play their parts well and their facial expressions are on point. My favorite part is definitively the ending. It's unexpected and it makes the whole conversation questionable, which is funny after all the trouble both people went through.

It is sarcastic and funny and points out that what we hear is sometimes confusing with what is actually going on.

I give The Car Service 4 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 10 to 18, plus adults. Reviewed by David O. and Julie S., KIDS FIRST! Jurors
Runtime: 2 minutes Juror Recommended Age: 10-18 Suggested Retail Price: $ Media: VIDEO



This title is in the KIDS FIRST! Film Festival - it may not be a regular, endorsed title
JINGLE THE DOG: A CHRISTMAS STORY - CHRIS BISHOP
Series: INDIE SHORT, AGES 3-10
Description - A heartwarming tale about a happy and clueless family pet in a wild Christmas adventure as Jingle the Dog is thrust into the real world. Jingle the Dog is enjoying his holiday time with the family. He senses danger outside the neighbor's house from a hungry raccoon and comes to the rescue of the neighbor's daughter. However, the neighbors see it differently and demand that the dog is sent away.
KIDS FIRST!® Adult Jurors say - The 2D animated short film, Jingle the Dog is pretty appealing. It tells a very relatable story and leaves you wondering the whole time and feeling different emotions. Without using words, it delivers a wonderful story and a good lesson.

This storyline is about a dog that lives with a nice, happy family until a misunderstanding happens. The dad plans to give the wrongfully accused dog away. Instead, the kids think that instead, he should be free and send him off alone. The now homeless dog meets some animal friends and goes on a journey to make his way back home and to try to be accepted again.

I like that the story teaches people how bad misunderstandings can be, and also teaches people to try to understand others before you come to conclusions. I really love the animation in this film. It is like watching a story book come to life. The locations are normal places, such as a home, a frozen pond where people ice skate and a snowy forest. The settings are all perfect for a winter film. Even without words, the story is well told and has great Christmas music featuring the marimba (which I love). The illustration and animation artist, Modeo Media Animation Studio has created really fantastic illustrations. My favorite part is when the dog and the raccoon fight. The stances they make before they start fighting are funny.

The message of this film is that misunderstandings can end really bad and you should take time to understand a problem before you jump to conclusions.

I give Jingle the Dog 4 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 3 to 10. I recommend it for a film festival because it is a great film that kids will enjoy and be able to watch with their parents. Reviewed by Tiana S., KIDS FIRST! Film Critic.
KIDS FIRST!® Kid Jurors say - The 2D animated short film, Jingle the Dog is pretty appealing. It tells a very relatable story and leaves you wondering the whole time and feeling different emotions. Without using words, it delivers a wonderful story and a good lesson.

This storyline is about a dog that lives with a nice, happy family until a misunderstanding happens. The dad plans to give the wrongfully accused dog away. Instead, the kids think that instead, he should be free and send him off alone. The now homeless dog meets some animal friends and goes on a journey to make his way back home and to try to be accepted again.

I like that the story teaches people how bad misunderstandings can be, and also teaches people to try to understand others before you come to conclusions. I really love the animation in this film. It is like watching a story book come to life. The locations are normal places, such as a home, a frozen pond where people ice skate and a snowy forest. The settings are all perfect for a winter film. Even without words, the story is well told and has great Christmas music featuring the marimba (which I love). The illustration and animation artist, Modeo Media Animation Studio has created really fantastic illustrations. My favorite part is when the dog and the raccoon fight. The stances they make before they start fighting are funny.

The message of this film is that misunderstandings can end really bad and you should take time to understand a problem before you jump to conclusions.

I give Jingle the Dog 4 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 3 to 10. I recommend it for a film festival because it is a great film that kids will enjoy and be able to watch with their parents. Reviewed by Tiana S., KIDS FIRST! Film Critic.
Runtime: 22 minutes Juror Recommended Age: 3-10 Suggested Retail Price: $ Media: VIDEO



This title is in the KIDS FIRST! Film Festival - it may not be a regular, endorsed title
DAY IN THE LIFE OF A BOY, A - FOURMAT FILM GMBH
Series: INDIE SHORT, AGE 9-18
Description - Autistic boy Daan has a unique perspective on the world. His little sister Millie struggles with his sometimes strange behavior and the lack of attention she gets from their single mother. When Daan accidentally kills her pet bird, emotions overflow - will Millie be able to be there for her brother despite it all? The film encounters the child protagonists at eye level and allows room for both perspectives.
KIDS FIRST!® Adult Jurors say - I love the rawness of this film and appreciate that it takes a glimpse of the reality this boy lives. I also like that it shows the perspectives of the boy's sister and his mom as well. It is very sad in some ways, yet it shows the dynamics of this family quite well. Daan lives with autism and, it is not only difficult for him, but it effects his family very profoundly also. The use of close-ups show how the boy is very sensory sensitive and how he likes to feel things. The close-ups show things such as the grain in the rocks he picks up and feels in his hands and the carpet he runs through his fingers. There is music only at poignant times of major frustration and it is loud confusing rock music that denotes how the intensity of things, even trivial things, upset the boy. The lack of music elsewhere intensifies what he feels, even when he is simply feeling the touch of things. The characters are fitted very well with the actors. There is not a lot of dialogue at times and the expressions and actions are very well done by all. Daan does not have expressions like a normal child and they are done very well. The reaction expressions, especially the subtle ones from Millie and their mom are on point. The message of the film is that you never know what people are dealing with behind closed doors and how difficult their situation is, until you have actually experienced it. I would never have known the actual intensity of experiencing what this family experiences without watching this film. My favorite part is when the little girl sings her brother the song. I liked that, because she was very upset and sad right before that and blamed her brother for her bird's death. Then, she seems to understand that it is his condition and she wants to help him. I give A Say in the Life of a Boy 4.5 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 9 to 18, plus adults. Reviewed by Melissa M., KIDS FIRST! Adult juror.
KIDS FIRST!® Kid Jurors say - I love the rawness of this film and appreciate that it takes a glimpse of the reality this boy lives. I also like that it shows the perspectives of the boy's sister and his mom as well. It is very sad in some ways, yet it shows the dynamics of this family quite well. Daan lives with autism and, it is not only difficult for him, but it effects his family very profoundly also. The use of close-ups show how the boy is very sensory sensitive and how he likes to feel things. The close-ups show things such as the grain in the rocks he picks up and feels in his hands and the carpet he runs through his fingers. There is music only at poignant times of major frustration and it is loud confusing rock music that denotes how the intensity of things, even trivial things, upset the boy. The lack of music elsewhere intensifies what he feels, even when he is simply feeling the touch of things. The characters are fitted very well with the actors. There is not a lot of dialogue at times and the expressions and actions are very well done by all. Daan does not have expressions like a normal child and they are done very well. The reaction expressions, especially the subtle ones from Millie and their mom are on point. The message of the film is that you never know what people are dealing with behind closed doors and how difficult their situation is, until you have actually experienced it. I would never have known the actual intensity of experiencing what this family experiences without watching this film. My favorite part is when the little girl sings her brother the song. I liked that, because she was very upset and sad right before that and blamed her brother for her bird's death. Then, she seems to understand that it is his condition and she wants to help him. I give A Say in the Life of a Boy 4.5 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 9 to 18, plus adults. Reviewed by Melissa M., KIDS FIRST! Adult juror.
Runtime: 14 minutes Juror Recommended Age: 9-18 Suggested Retail Price: $ Media: VIDEO


This title is in the KIDS FIRST! Film Festival - it may not be a regular, endorsed title
DEEP FEARS - RYAN CHU
Series: INDIE SHORT, AGES 5-12
Description - A sea otter who is afraid of the ocean is challenged to face his fears when he loses his precious pink shell necklace at sea.
KIDS FIRST!® Adult Jurors say - This is exactly the type of film that KIDS FIRST! loves! It is truly a delight. The student produced, animated film Deep Fears is wonderfully produced and shows a story of growth and personal change. Without using any words, the film is able to show the struggle of the sea otter that is afraid of the water and what he does to overcome it. It's easy to understand and fun to watch.

The story follows a sea otter that is afraid of water and is attacked by a crab and loses his necklace in the water. After he almost drowns getting it, he is rescued by a seal that helps get him accustomed to the water.

I like how this story is told without using any words, and I like how the sea otter overcomes his fear. The animation is quite lovely and portrays the sea otter quite well, especially its exaggerated expressions. My favorite camera shot is when the sea otter is about to drown and is saved by the seal. The entire film takes place on the seashore and in the sea. The background music is exquisite and really enhances the action. For example, in the beginning, it is sad music, which accompanies us seeing the sea otter being afraid of water. Later, at the end, there is happy music when he overcomes his fears.

The main two characters are the sea otter and the seal, both of which are animated. Ryan Chu directs and Joseph Bucsit creates the music. The crew on this film are all students and their work excels in every way. My favorite part of the film is seeing the sea otter poking and prodding at the water, as it really gives a sense of frustration and of fear.

The film's message is about overcoming one's fear, and how a friend in need is a friend indeed. The beautiful ending showing the two friends together, the otter and the seal, watching the sun set and their images in the sand says it all.

I give Deep Fears 5 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 5 to 12. Reviewed by Raj S., KIDS FIRST! Juror
KIDS FIRST!® Kid Jurors say - This is exactly the type of film that KIDS FIRST! loves! It is truly a delight. The student produced, animated film Deep Fears is wonderfully produced and shows a story of growth and personal change. Without using any words, the film is able to show the struggle of the sea otter that is afraid of the water and what he does to overcome it. It's easy to understand and fun to watch.

The story follows a sea otter that is afraid of water and is attacked by a crab and loses his necklace in the water. After he almost drowns getting it, he is rescued by a seal that helps get him accustomed to the water.

I like how this story is told without using any words, and I like how the sea otter overcomes his fear. The animation is quite lovely and portrays the sea otter quite well, especially its exaggerated expressions. My favorite camera shot is when the sea otter is about to drown and is saved by the seal. The entire film takes place on the seashore and in the sea. The background music is exquisite and really enhances the action. For example, in the beginning, it is sad music, which accompanies us seeing the sea otter being afraid of water. Later, at the end, there is happy music when he overcomes his fears.

The main two characters are the sea otter and the seal, both of which are animated. Ryan Chu directs and Joseph Bucsit creates the music. The crew on this film are all students and their work excels in every way. My favorite part of the film is seeing the sea otter poking and prodding at the water, as it really gives a sense of frustration and of fear.

The film's message is about overcoming one's fear, and how a friend in need is a friend indeed. The beautiful ending showing the two friends together, the otter and the seal, watching the sun set and their images in the sand says it all.

I give Deep Fears 5 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 5 to 12. Reviewed by Raj S., KIDS FIRST! Juror
Runtime: 3 minutes Juror Recommended Age: 5-12 Suggested Retail Price: $ Media: VIDEO



This title is in the KIDS FIRST! Film Festival - it may not be a regular, endorsed title
YANA - SARAH BAUR
Series: FOREIGN SHORT, AGES 12-18
Description - Yana, a heroic 10-year-old girl, is given the task of cleaning up the shards of her parents' broken marriage in the attic of her former home. Unprocessed grief and a family secret undermine her grip on reality. A touch of magic and a wee bit of mischief release Yana from the demands of the grown-up world and allow a new friendship to bloom. Just like the main character, the film steps in and out of reality: it's an ode to the healing powers of imagination and the resilience that children derive from it to cope with their problems.
KIDS FIRST!® Adult Jurors say - I love how the curiosity builds up so much at the beginning of Yana. I like that the curiosity is built so subtly with the music and camera angles and I like how Yana's face is subtly expressive and her actions are all so purposeful. However, when she does get emotional it comes out really strong and it is very emotional to watch. This short film Belgium follows Yana taking a trip across town on her bicycle to her old house. She needs to clean it out and that brings up a lot of heavy emotions for her. She heads back home, realizing she is locked out, and that adds to the frustration until she meets a friend.

I really like how the story brings Yana to her old house and back on such an emotional journey. It shows that, as sad as she was, she could still be a child and have fun. The cinematography is quite good; the camera angles add to building the audience's curiosity. When she rides her bike, the quiet music and camera focus is on the bike and the sound of her pedaling which show us there is meaning and purpose to this journey. The different shots show the time progression. When she cleans out the room all by herself, it is very emotional as it becomes empty. I love the location and sets. The house is filled with so many personal items and personal memories. You see her sadness and suddenly, she starts blowing bubbles just for fun. The background music plays a key role in focusing your attention to where it needs to be. For example, it is quiet so you can hear the pedaling. It is sad and depressing when she is bagging up things to get rid of all by herself. Hasse Huygens, who plays Yana, delivers a very believable performance. We see her trying to be so brave and get the job done, taking on a job that no child should have to do alone and when she hits an emotional breaking point and bounces back to being a happy go lucky child, your heart breaks a bit for her. My favorite part of the film is when we see her playing and having fun like a kid, despite all the responsibility and emotional trauma she is experiencing. My least favorite part is when the realtor tells her to tell her mom to clear out the house completely, though her response is terrific!

This film shows that kids are very immensely affected by the actions of adults that are central to their lives. It also shows how resilient children are, against all odds. You should know that it contains some mild profanity (shit) plus she flips off the man while showing the house. The film makes me curious to learn more about childhood trauma. There is so much more for us to learn about things that affect children, as this film shows. I give Yana 4 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 12 to 18, plus adults. Reviewed by Melissa M., KIDS FIRST! Adult Juror
KIDS FIRST!® Kid Jurors say - I love how the curiosity builds up so much at the beginning of Yana. I like that the curiosity is built so subtly with the music and camera angles and I like how Yana's face is subtly expressive and her actions are all so purposeful. However, when she does get emotional it comes out really strong and it is very emotional to watch. This short film Belgium follows Yana taking a trip across town on her bicycle to her old house. She needs to clean it out and that brings up a lot of heavy emotions for her. She heads back home, realizing she is locked out, and that adds to the frustration until she meets a friend.

I really like how the story brings Yana to her old house and back on such an emotional journey. It shows that, as sad as she was, she could still be a child and have fun. The cinematography is quite good; the camera angles add to building the audience's curiosity. When she rides her bike, the quiet music and camera focus is on the bike and the sound of her pedaling which show us there is meaning and purpose to this journey. The different shots show the time progression. When she cleans out the room all by herself, it is very emotional as it becomes empty. I love the location and sets. The house is filled with so many personal items and personal memories. You see her sadness and suddenly, she starts blowing bubbles just for fun. The background music plays a key role in focusing your attention to where it needs to be. For example, it is quiet so you can hear the pedaling. It is sad and depressing when she is bagging up things to get rid of all by herself. Hasse Huygens, who plays Yana, delivers a very believable performance. We see her trying to be so brave and get the job done, taking on a job that no child should have to do alone and when she hits an emotional breaking point and bounces back to being a happy go lucky child, your heart breaks a bit for her. My favorite part of the film is when we see her playing and having fun like a kid, despite all the responsibility and emotional trauma she is experiencing. My least favorite part is when the realtor tells her to tell her mom to clear out the house completely, though her response is terrific!

This film shows that kids are very immensely affected by the actions of adults that are central to their lives. It also shows how resilient children are, against all odds. You should know that it contains some mild profanity (shit) plus she flips off the man while showing the house. The film makes me curious to learn more about childhood trauma. There is so much more for us to learn about things that affect children, as this film shows. I give Yana 4 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 12 to 18, plus adults. Reviewed by Melissa M., KIDS FIRST! Adult Juror
Runtime: 20 minutes Juror Recommended Age: 12-18 Suggested Retail Price: $ Media: VIDEO



This title is in the KIDS FIRST! Film Festival - it may not be a regular, endorsed title
MARIA THE SUPER HELPER / MARIA LA SUPER AYUDANTE - LUZ MARIA MACK
Series: INDIE SHORT, AGES 2-5
Description - In this animation and book, you find Mar�a and her siblings discover fun ways to work together as a family. At the same time, they help out with housework and small backyard farming chores, and the best part it's in English/Spanish.
KIDS FIRST!® Adult Jurors say - The animated short film, Maria the Super Helper is very fun to watch and gives you a feeling of happiness! The animation style is good and very simplistic, as is the story. And, it is told in both English and Spanish. This makes it great for younger audiences and for people learning English or Spanish. Although it is a bit slow at times, it is definitely worth watching.

The storyline describes a day in the lives of Maria and her family. Maria wakes up, cleans the house, sweeps the porch, washes the dishes and does other chores with her family. They also eat and play with each other.

The storyline is quite basic. The images are lovely, however the animation is not full motion animation, which may be a turn off for some. On the other hand, its bilingual element makes up for that and there are many shots that are just charming. One that stands out is the shot of Maria cleaning the house with her siblings as it has an interesting camera angle. Another shot of note is of Maria and her siblings sweeping the porch where the camera zooms out to show an interesting angle of Maria's house. The sets and locations are different parts of inside and outside of Maria's house. We see the bedrooms inside and the pigs and hens outside. I like how it captures the environment that Maria lives in quite well. The sound effects are typical of the environment from birds chirping to running bath water. The characters are Maria, her parents and her brothers. The key influencers of the film are Luz Maria Mack (author), Vanessa Balleza (illustrator), Victor Colon (animator) and Carter Mangan Jr. (musician). Of these, Vanessa Balleza and Victor Colon probably stand out the most because the imagery in the film is what drives it.

The film focuses on how Maria and her family work and play hard together. It shows the value of hard work, family and interpersonal relationships. It exudes happiness in every way. My favorite part of the film is the ending, when "super helpers" are able to have a snack with their parents. After spending the day working, they are able to enjoy a moment with their family.

I give Maria the Super Helper 4 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 2 to 5. I think it would be a valuable and interesting addition to a youth and family film festival, particular those with a Hispanic or multi-cultural focus. Reviewed by Raj S. KIDS FIRST! Youth Juror
KIDS FIRST!® Kid Jurors say - The animated short film, Maria the Super Helper is very fun to watch and gives you a feeling of happiness! The animation style is good and very simplistic, as is the story. And, it is told in both English and Spanish. This makes it great for younger audiences and for people learning English or Spanish. Although it is a bit slow at times, it is definitely worth watching.

The storyline describes a day in the lives of Maria and her family. Maria wakes up, cleans the house, sweeps the porch, washes the dishes and does other chores with her family. They also eat and play with each other.

The storyline is quite basic. The images are lovely, however the animation is not full motion animation, which may be a turn off for some. On the other hand, its bilingual element makes up for that and there are many shots that are just charming. One that stands out is the shot of Maria cleaning the house with her siblings as it has an interesting camera angle. Another shot of note is of Maria and her siblings sweeping the porch where the camera zooms out to show an interesting angle of Maria's house. The sets and locations are different parts of inside and outside of Maria's house. We see the bedrooms inside and the pigs and hens outside. I like how it captures the environment that Maria lives in quite well. The sound effects are typical of the environment from birds chirping to running bath water. The characters are Maria, her parents and her brothers. The key influencers of the film are Luz Maria Mack (author), Vanessa Balleza (illustrator), Victor Colon (animator) and Carter Mangan Jr. (musician). Of these, Vanessa Balleza and Victor Colon probably stand out the most because the imagery in the film is what drives it.

The film focuses on how Maria and her family work and play hard together. It shows the value of hard work, family and interpersonal relationships. It exudes happiness in every way. My favorite part of the film is the ending, when "super helpers" are able to have a snack with their parents. After spending the day working, they are able to enjoy a moment with their family.

I give Maria the Super Helper 4 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 2 to 5. I think it would be a valuable and interesting addition to a youth and family film festival, particular those with a Hispanic or multi-cultural focus. Reviewed by Raj S. KIDS FIRST! Youth Juror
Runtime: 5 minutes Juror Recommended Age: 2-5 Suggested Retail Price: $ Media: VIDEO



This title is in the KIDS FIRST! Film Festival - it may not be a regular, endorsed title
HARVEST - HARVEST SHORT FILM
Series: INDIE SHORT, AGES 5-8
Description - Summer is bitter that it's Fall's turn to shine as she brings along her season. What drives him over the edge are her pesky leaves interrupting his daily activities. He tries to stop her but as we all know, change is inevitable and he learns that he's better off making a new friend.
KIDS FIRST!® Adult Jurors say - The animation in Harvest is very cute, as are the character designs and colors.

The storyline tells how Summer is upset that Fall is approaching and tries to stop her from working.

I like the use of seasons as metaphors for change, and how this lead to a really cute friendship story. The cinematography is well executed 2D. It's not very unique, but it's completely acceptable. The character designs are very cute, with great representations of Summer and Fall respectively. The setting of this short is very appealing and quaint. I like how it gives off the vibes of a small town neighborhood. The sound effects really help emphasize the jokes, and I really like them. The background music is fun and uplifting. My favorite parts are the animation and the character designs. The overall style and aesthetic of this film is really cute and appealing.

The message of the film is that we need to accept change and make the best out of it.

I give Harvest 5 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 5 to 8. It is a very cute and wholesome short and would make a lovely addition to a KIDS FIRST! Film Festival. Reviewed by Calista B., KIDS FIRST! Film Critic
KIDS FIRST!® Kid Jurors say - The animation in Harvest is very cute, as are the character designs and colors.

The storyline tells how Summer is upset that Fall is approaching and tries to stop her from working.

I like the use of seasons as metaphors for change, and how this lead to a really cute friendship story. The cinematography is well executed 2D. It's not very unique, but it's completely acceptable. The character designs are very cute, with great representations of Summer and Fall respectively. The setting of this short is very appealing and quaint. I like how it gives off the vibes of a small town neighborhood. The sound effects really help emphasize the jokes, and I really like them. The background music is fun and uplifting. My favorite parts are the animation and the character designs. The overall style and aesthetic of this film is really cute and appealing.

The message of the film is that we need to accept change and make the best out of it.

I give Harvest 5 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 5 to 8. It is a very cute and wholesome short and would make a lovely addition to a KIDS FIRST! Film Festival. Reviewed by Calista B., KIDS FIRST! Film Critic
Runtime: 4 minutes Juror Recommended Age: 5-8 Suggested Retail Price: $ Media: VIDEO



This title is in the KIDS FIRST! Film Festival - it may not be a regular, endorsed title
NO INTERNET - KYLE LAWRENCE
Series: FOREIGN SHORT, AGES 10-18
Description - A group of teens have to go an entire year without the internet. They discover there's a clandestine organization pulling the strings and it's up to them to save their town.
KIDS FIRST!® Adult Jurors say - The high production quality and intriguing storyline make No Internet a very appealing film. This Canadian short seems like it could easily evolve into a Hollywood-grade movie!

It's just been announced: a small town in Canada has decided to go an entire year without the internet or cellular data. A group of teens decide to sleuth out exactly why this is happening, and find a nefarious Neo-Luddist group pulling the strings of this operation.

The idea itself is quite interesting to explore and the setting, a first-world country, makes this idea even more unique. We've seen films where underdeveloped countries don't have the internet, but to think that a town in a country like Canada would go to these measures is interesting. I also like that No Internet ends on a bit of a cliffhanger note, but wish that there would be a bit more of development to the story at the end. It seems a bit too unresolved.

The cinematography in this film is absolutely breathtaking - I love how stable the motion shots are (when the characters are biking around town) and how dynamic the lighting is in each shot, especially those shot in the science lab. The camera work really adds to this film! No Internet is set in a Canadian town and filmed in parts of Vancouver. The setting is beautiful with lush forests, large homes and a serene feeling that provides refreshing break from its fast-paced plot.

The music is a mix of suspenseful, dark tunes and cinematic, melancholy harmonies. The music hinges on the scene it plays in and thereby drives the action perfectly. The sound effects in this film are mainly during scenes where the villains are devising plans in their high-tech lab. They perfectly fit the sci-fi aura of the scenes. There are some special effects which help round out the film's realism; the 'no internet' graphic on the characters' computers is computer-generated, as is the entirety of the villains' lab. These are effective and quite believable.

Kyle Lawrence is the director, writer and producer of No Internet. His direction and production skills shine above all. Hunter Dillon and Miles Reed play Zach and James Parker, Jarrett Lynch plays Mateo, Hope Vissia plays Kaitlyn, Trey Foreman plays Ethan, and Cedric Ducharme plays Brody. The Parker brothers are unique characters with a special dynamic between them - rocky at times, but solid and loving overall. Dillon and Reed excel in these roles and their brotherly chemistry definitely works! Besides these characters, Jarrett Lynch puts on an incredible performance as the mysterious Mateo - all of the cast are skilled at emoting, but he's the best of all. I found the scene where the Parker brothers sort out their emotions to be (and this is something few can do well) emotionally touching and actually not that over-the-top. The scene is shot effectively, with realistic dialogue and emotions.

There's not an overarching moral message, but I suppose one could interpret this short film as telling kids that we've become really reliant on technology in the 21st century, and that the world doesn't end when we lose Wi-Fi.

I give No Internet 4 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 10 to 18. It has awesome cinematography, superb performances, and a unique plot idea. It would make a great addition to any festival focused on stories about technology and how it affects the lives we live. Reviewed by Eshaan M., KIDS FIRST! Film Critic
KIDS FIRST!® Kid Jurors say - The high production quality and intriguing storyline make No Internet a very appealing film. This Canadian short seems like it could easily evolve into a Hollywood-grade movie!

It's just been announced: a small town in Canada has decided to go an entire year without the internet or cellular data. A group of teens decide to sleuth out exactly why this is happening, and find a nefarious Neo-Luddist group pulling the strings of this operation.

The idea itself is quite interesting to explore and the setting, a first-world country, makes this idea even more unique. We've seen films where underdeveloped countries don't have the internet, but to think that a town in a country like Canada would go to these measures is interesting. I also like that No Internet ends on a bit of a cliffhanger note, but wish that there would be a bit more of development to the story at the end. It seems a bit too unresolved.

The cinematography in this film is absolutely breathtaking - I love how stable the motion shots are (when the characters are biking around town) and how dynamic the lighting is in each shot, especially those shot in the science lab. The camera work really adds to this film! No Internet is set in a Canadian town and filmed in parts of Vancouver. The setting is beautiful with lush forests, large homes and a serene feeling that provides refreshing break from its fast-paced plot.

The music is a mix of suspenseful, dark tunes and cinematic, melancholy harmonies. The music hinges on the scene it plays in and thereby drives the action perfectly. The sound effects in this film are mainly during scenes where the villains are devising plans in their high-tech lab. They perfectly fit the sci-fi aura of the scenes. There are some special effects which help round out the film's realism; the 'no internet' graphic on the characters' computers is computer-generated, as is the entirety of the villains' lab. These are effective and quite believable.

Kyle Lawrence is the director, writer and producer of No Internet. His direction and production skills shine above all. Hunter Dillon and Miles Reed play Zach and James Parker, Jarrett Lynch plays Mateo, Hope Vissia plays Kaitlyn, Trey Foreman plays Ethan, and Cedric Ducharme plays Brody. The Parker brothers are unique characters with a special dynamic between them - rocky at times, but solid and loving overall. Dillon and Reed excel in these roles and their brotherly chemistry definitely works! Besides these characters, Jarrett Lynch puts on an incredible performance as the mysterious Mateo - all of the cast are skilled at emoting, but he's the best of all. I found the scene where the Parker brothers sort out their emotions to be (and this is something few can do well) emotionally touching and actually not that over-the-top. The scene is shot effectively, with realistic dialogue and emotions.

There's not an overarching moral message, but I suppose one could interpret this short film as telling kids that we've become really reliant on technology in the 21st century, and that the world doesn't end when we lose Wi-Fi.

I give No Internet 4 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 10 to 18. It has awesome cinematography, superb performances, and a unique plot idea. It would make a great addition to any festival focused on stories about technology and how it affects the lives we live. Reviewed by Eshaan M., KIDS FIRST! Film Critic
Runtime: 26 minutes Juror Recommended Age: 10-18 Suggested Retail Price: $ Media: VIDEO



This title is in the KIDS FIRST! Film Festival - it may not be a regular, endorsed title
GRAMMAR REALM, THE: REMEMBER S - JEREMY ARTHUR
Series: INDIE SHORT, AGES 2-8
Description - Do your kids find learning grammar to be a boring, anxiety-inducing nightmare? Well, perhaps a comedic sci-fi fantasy fever dream is just what the teacher ordered. Join S, an ill-mannered, self-centered snake, cast down from his realm of ever-growing plurality by a well-meaning, not-so-all-knowing Sun, and sent on a mission to help lonely, young Brad find a friend. Together they uncover some important lessons about subject-verb agreement, but will it be enough to solve poor Brad's growing existential crisis? Spoiler alert: it won't. But the truths they uncover while exploring the Grammar Realm will help people of all ages to establish a firm foundation in English grammar understanding, while allowing their sense of wonder to thrive.
KIDS FIRST!® Adult Jurors say - The Grammar Realm is fun and goofy with a glorious combination of bright colors and delightfully quirky characters, plus an out of this world set.

The film brings life to learning about numbers, words and grammar. It creates a world of characters representing letters, numbers and words to make learning more fun.

I like how this film brings everything together smoothly to help teach these things without preaching. It's a great hook that makes it easier for kids to retain information after viewing. The animation is quite fun and the images are very childlike. The costumes are funny and exaggerated that just add to the silliness of the whole experience. I like the locations being outside with a blue sky and green grass and seeing the tree in the background drinking coffee. It adds to the quirkiness. The outer space location offers a great change of scenery that goes with when they are teaching a different lesson. The background music adds to the quirkiness. The music is really fun and exciting, especially when they are dealing with changing singular status to plural. All the characters are really funny and different. The sun stands out even though the face seemed initially too simple, it grows on you. All the faces are what really make this great. The bright colors and unique quirky style will really attract the attention of young viewers. My favorite part is where Brad is in a state of confusion and spinning.

The message of this film is that learning can be fun and it demonstrates how grammar and numbers are used in our everyday lives.

I give The Grammar Realm 5 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 2 to 8. It has an excellent unique style, which makes it a great educational tool. Reviewed by Melissa M., KIDS FIRST! Juror.
KIDS FIRST!® Kid Jurors say - The Grammar Realm is fun and goofy with a glorious combination of bright colors and delightfully quirky characters, plus an out of this world set.

The film brings life to learning about numbers, words and grammar. It creates a world of characters representing letters, numbers and words to make learning more fun.

I like how this film brings everything together smoothly to help teach these things without preaching. It's a great hook that makes it easier for kids to retain information after viewing. The animation is quite fun and the images are very childlike. The costumes are funny and exaggerated that just add to the silliness of the whole experience. I like the locations being outside with a blue sky and green grass and seeing the tree in the background drinking coffee. It adds to the quirkiness. The outer space location offers a great change of scenery that goes with when they are teaching a different lesson. The background music adds to the quirkiness. The music is really fun and exciting, especially when they are dealing with changing singular status to plural. All the characters are really funny and different. The sun stands out even though the face seemed initially too simple, it grows on you. All the faces are what really make this great. The bright colors and unique quirky style will really attract the attention of young viewers. My favorite part is where Brad is in a state of confusion and spinning.

The message of this film is that learning can be fun and it demonstrates how grammar and numbers are used in our everyday lives.

I give The Grammar Realm 5 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 2 to 8. It has an excellent unique style, which makes it a great educational tool. Reviewed by Melissa M., KIDS FIRST! Juror.
Runtime: 15 minutes Juror Recommended Age: 1-8 Suggested Retail Price: $ Media: VIDEO



This title is in the KIDS FIRST! Film Festival - it may not be a regular, endorsed title
BIRDS - GIORGI TKEMALADZE
Series: FOREIGN SHORT, AGES 10-14
Description - A grandmother replies to her grandson's curious questions and one answer impels the child to catch birds so he can see his deceased mother. The boy spends his days on the roof trying to catch many birds. His grandmother reacts calmly to his desire, only remarking that birds have mothers and they miss them too. Later a group of older boys bully the boy and that changes a lot of thing for the little dreamer.
KIDS FIRST!® Adult Jurors say - The short student film Birds has a beautiful message. I love how young and small the boy is, his performance is what makes it so precious. The stories that his grandma tells him and how he listens to her is heartwarming. The story begins after the little boy's mother has passed and his grandma struggles to help him cope with his loss. She uses the birds to explain to him that his mother is always close to him and he keeps the birds to stay close.

I like how the grandma uses the birds to show the boy that his mom is still around him and how the boy really clings to that for a while, before he decides to think about it in a different way.

The use of close-ups is notable in the beginning as it slowly reveals the characters. I also like how the camera shakily follows him as he walks through the snow and how it pans up to show the corn at the top of the door to pique your curiosity. The camera work is delightful. However, this digital file that we were given to review the film on is of very poor quality. We cannot accept this file. As much as we love the film, with a good file, we cannot screen it in the KIDS FIRST! Film Festival

The boy's coat, scarf and gloves really show how bitterly cold it must be and gives you a really strong feeling of how it must feel for the boy. The little house where the boy lives with his grandmother shows us that they live in very modest means. The background music stands out because it is mysterious and really made me wonder what was going to happen. The young boy and his grandma's relationship is very convincing. The love they have for each other and the care that the boy shows for the birds and how he evolves is beautiful. I love when the boy lets the birds go and giggles.

The message of this film is about how the love between you and your lost loved ones does not need to include the sacrifices of others. You should know that it does show the boy doing risky things that kids might imitate. Also, there are older kids that show up who are cruel to the birds and the boy becomes violent with the boys. You should also know that the dialogue, which there is very little of, is in French with English subtitles. The film itself is from Georgia.

I give Birds 5 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 10 to 14. Reviewed by Melissa M.
KIDS FIRST!® Kid Jurors say - The short student film Birds has a beautiful message. I love how young and small the boy is, his performance is what makes it so precious. The stories that his grandma tells him and how he listens to her is heartwarming. The story begins after the little boy's mother has passed and his grandma struggles to help him cope with his loss. She uses the birds to explain to him that his mother is always close to him and he keeps the birds to stay close.

I like how the grandma uses the birds to show the boy that his mom is still around him and how the boy really clings to that for a while, before he decides to think about it in a different way.

The use of close-ups is notable in the beginning as it slowly reveals the characters. I also like how the camera shakily follows him as he walks through the snow and how it pans up to show the corn at the top of the door to pique your curiosity. The camera work is delightful. However, this digital file that we were given to review the film on is of very poor quality. We cannot accept this file. As much as we love the film, with a good file, we cannot screen it in the KIDS FIRST! Film Festival

The boy's coat, scarf and gloves really show how bitterly cold it must be and gives you a really strong feeling of how it must feel for the boy. The little house where the boy lives with his grandmother shows us that they live in very modest means. The background music stands out because it is mysterious and really made me wonder what was going to happen. The young boy and his grandma's relationship is very convincing. The love they have for each other and the care that the boy shows for the birds and how he evolves is beautiful. I love when the boy lets the birds go and giggles.

The message of this film is about how the love between you and your lost loved ones does not need to include the sacrifices of others. You should know that it does show the boy doing risky things that kids might imitate. Also, there are older kids that show up who are cruel to the birds and the boy becomes violent with the boys. You should also know that the dialogue, which there is very little of, is in French with English subtitles. The film itself is from Georgia.

I give Birds 5 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 10 to 14. Reviewed by Melissa M.
Runtime: 12 minutes Juror Recommended Age: 10-14 Suggested Retail Price: $ Media: VIDEO



This title is in the KIDS FIRST! Film Festival - it may not be a regular, endorsed title
WETLAND, THE - DUSAN DAVIDOV
Series: FOREIGN DOCUMENTARY, AGES 13-18
Description - "The Wetland" is a documentary movie about the bird ringers. It�s also a movie about volunteering. There is no main character in the movie because they all are main characters - bird ringers and their helpers. It doesn�t matter who speaks because they speak as one. Their names are not important. Important is just their love for nature. In order to devote themselves to their "hobby" they are willing to sacrifice their holidays, spend their own money to buy bird rings, food and transportation to the stationary point. They are doing this because they are convinced that it has a deeper meaning and that they are helping the nature.
KIDS FIRST!® Adult Jurors say - The Wetland has the most breathtaking landscapes! This documentary from Slovakia (with English subtitles) has beautiful shots where forests and mountains can be appreciated. It is an informational documentary that definitely generates an appreciation for nature.

The documentary focuses on the diverse birds that go through Slovakia during diverse migration cycles. It presents information about them, and how scientists study them to analyze big populations. The imagery is beautifully filmed.

The narrator explores the role of scientists in collecting data based on all the birds they are able to track. I enjoyed how they touch personal experiences and why some scientists got into their careers. The camera shots are very high quality. Each detail in color and texture can be appreciated, especially of the birds and their natural environment. The shots in the mountains while it is raining are particularly beautifully done. All the locations are full of color. They are diverse as they try to show the habitats for each of the different bird species. The background music adds to the tone of the film. It brings a playful tone that results in joy whenever the birds are shown. The live sounds of the birds are also well captured.

The characters are day-to-day workers who share their love for their work. They are willing to work for long days, rainy days and sometimes holidays just to do what they believe will help their country and their world. The director's point of view in revealing their personal lives helps give us insight into those who are working in the field. This documentary is informational as it educates the viewer about birds, their migration paths, and how the process of tracking them is accomplished. When nature is exposed like this, it really makes the viewer think about the beauty and diversity of the planet and how we should work hard to preserve it for future generations, so they can also appreciate the animals around the world. I love all the shots of the birds. The film shows them in different stages of their lives, so it is fun to see how they develop from little and vulnerable birds into large and colorful adults. The close-ups are particularly helpful.

I learned so much about all the birds featured in this film - their migration, feeding habits, cycles in their lives and about the people that work to preserve them. It made me want to read and learn more about the native bird species of my city and even my state. Maybe some of the birds from the film travel to the US during the change of seasons.

I give The Wetland 5 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 13 to 18, plus adults. The film is well-done, very interesting and informative. The dialogue is in Slovakian with English subtitles so its audience would primarily teenagers and adults that have an interest in nature, the environment and climate change. Reviewed by David O., KIDS FIRST! Adult Juror
KIDS FIRST!® Kid Jurors say - The Wetland has the most breathtaking landscapes! This documentary from Slovakia (with English subtitles) has beautiful shots where forests and mountains can be appreciated. It is an informational documentary that definitely generates an appreciation for nature.

The documentary focuses on the diverse birds that go through Slovakia during diverse migration cycles. It presents information about them, and how scientists study them to analyze big populations. The imagery is beautifully filmed.

The narrator explores the role of scientists in collecting data based on all the birds they are able to track. I enjoyed how they touch personal experiences and why some scientists got into their careers. The camera shots are very high quality. Each detail in color and texture can be appreciated, especially of the birds and their natural environment. The shots in the mountains while it is raining are particularly beautifully done. All the locations are full of color. They are diverse as they try to show the habitats for each of the different bird species. The background music adds to the tone of the film. It brings a playful tone that results in joy whenever the birds are shown. The live sounds of the birds are also well captured.

The characters are day-to-day workers who share their love for their work. They are willing to work for long days, rainy days and sometimes holidays just to do what they believe will help their country and their world. The director's point of view in revealing their personal lives helps give us insight into those who are working in the field. This documentary is informational as it educates the viewer about birds, their migration paths, and how the process of tracking them is accomplished. When nature is exposed like this, it really makes the viewer think about the beauty and diversity of the planet and how we should work hard to preserve it for future generations, so they can also appreciate the animals around the world. I love all the shots of the birds. The film shows them in different stages of their lives, so it is fun to see how they develop from little and vulnerable birds into large and colorful adults. The close-ups are particularly helpful.

I learned so much about all the birds featured in this film - their migration, feeding habits, cycles in their lives and about the people that work to preserve them. It made me want to read and learn more about the native bird species of my city and even my state. Maybe some of the birds from the film travel to the US during the change of seasons.

I give The Wetland 5 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 13 to 18, plus adults. The film is well-done, very interesting and informative. The dialogue is in Slovakian with English subtitles so its audience would primarily teenagers and adults that have an interest in nature, the environment and climate change. Reviewed by David O., KIDS FIRST! Adult Juror
Runtime: 52 minutes Juror Recommended Age: 13-18 Suggested Retail Price: $ Media: VIDEO



This title is in the KIDS FIRST! Film Festival - it may not be a regular, endorsed title
LEA'S SECRET - RICO GUTIERREZ
Series: INDIE SHORT, AGES 9-14
Description - When Lea and her father move in to their new condominium unit, she suddenly acquires the power to go through walls and closed doors. She doesn't tell anyone about it-- not even her mother who works as a nurse in London. At school, Lea tries out her newfound power to no avail. Taking note of her strange behavior, Teacher Cynthia reaches out and soon discovers that Lea's power is actually the ability to survive through the harrowing trauma of sexual molestation from her own father. This short animated film is based on the acclaimed children's book that aims to raise awareness on child sexual abuse, and empower victimized children to seek help and tell their stories.
KIDS FIRST!® Adult Jurors say - Lea's Secret offers a powerful, important message about safety and growth. This is the sort of story that, unfortunately, all children should learn for their personal safety. It is a well animated film that addresses the reality of molestation that affects children worldwide. Though the theme is more mature and children may find some depictions scary, the message is important and would be appreciated by older tweens and teens.

The story is about Lea's secret and how she has a special power that helps her pass through closed doors. But that's not the only secret she harbors, and she finds her powers can't protect her all the time. She needs the support of adults around her. Lea is a young, impressionable girl in a scary situation. She uses her imagination to propel her to safety, but realizes that true safety is in the arms of those who care for her. The film, based on the children's book Ang Lihim Ni Lea is well made. The animation is excellent and, although I am unfamiliar with the book's illustrator, appear to be based on the original illustrations by Ghani Madueno. The color pallet shifts as the mood changes in the storyline and the fluidity of the change is excellent. The scene when Lea explains her situation to her teacher and counselor is beautifully created. At the same time, it is haunting and powerful. The background music is thoughtfully appropriate and it enhances the emotional journey of Lea so well. The tone shifts from pensive, to happy, to the fearful and then to hope, very seamlessly. The transition of Lea's recovery is fantastic. The music becomes sweeter, the dark colors fade and become brighter and we feel hopeful. Lea's paleness suddenly turns to warmth. That is a compelling and inspiring scene.

The message of this film is that you can't escape a bad situation by creating the illusion of escape. You need to reach out to real people who love you so they can keep you safe.

I give Lea's Secret 5 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 9 to 14, plus adults. It is a thoughtfully made film with high production quality and a powerful message that may very well save a child's life one day. It is from the Philippines with dialogue in Tagalog and English subtitles. Its message of molestation and familial bonds is universal. This would make an excellent addition to a festival that is focusing on psychological issues that children experience and how to deal with them.

Reviewed by Cassidy S., KIDS FIRST! Juror
KIDS FIRST!® Kid Jurors say - Lea's Secret offers a powerful, important message about safety and growth. This is the sort of story that, unfortunately, all children should learn for their personal safety. It is a well animated film that addresses the reality of molestation that affects children worldwide. Though the theme is more mature and children may find some depictions scary, the message is important and would be appreciated by older tweens and teens.

The story is about Lea's secret and how she has a special power that helps her pass through closed doors. But that's not the only secret she harbors, and she finds her powers can't protect her all the time. She needs the support of adults around her. Lea is a young, impressionable girl in a scary situation. She uses her imagination to propel her to safety, but realizes that true safety is in the arms of those who care for her. The film, based on the children's book Ang Lihim Ni Lea is well made. The animation is excellent and, although I am unfamiliar with the book's illustrator, appear to be based on the original illustrations by Ghani Madueno. The color pallet shifts as the mood changes in the storyline and the fluidity of the change is excellent. The scene when Lea explains her situation to her teacher and counselor is beautifully created. At the same time, it is haunting and powerful. The background music is thoughtfully appropriate and it enhances the emotional journey of Lea so well. The tone shifts from pensive, to happy, to the fearful and then to hope, very seamlessly. The transition of Lea's recovery is fantastic. The music becomes sweeter, the dark colors fade and become brighter and we feel hopeful. Lea's paleness suddenly turns to warmth. That is a compelling and inspiring scene.

The message of this film is that you can't escape a bad situation by creating the illusion of escape. You need to reach out to real people who love you so they can keep you safe.

I give Lea's Secret 5 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 9 to 14, plus adults. It is a thoughtfully made film with high production quality and a powerful message that may very well save a child's life one day. It is from the Philippines with dialogue in Tagalog and English subtitles. Its message of molestation and familial bonds is universal. This would make an excellent addition to a festival that is focusing on psychological issues that children experience and how to deal with them.

Reviewed by Cassidy S., KIDS FIRST! Juror
Runtime: 5 minutes Juror Recommended Age: 9-14 Suggested Retail Price: $ Media: VIDEO



This title is in the KIDS FIRST! Film Festival - it may not be a regular, endorsed title
MY SISTER SKIPPED A GRADE - ASAF YECHESKEL
Series: FOREIGN SHORT, AGES 8-18
Description - The Series tells the story of two sisters - teenager Michal (Mia Bakowski) and her little sister Ronnie (Bar Minialy), who skipped two classes and now attends high school with her.
KIDS FIRST!® Adult Jurors say - My Sister Skipped a Grade is so cute. The kids are pretty relatable in a very dramatic way. The competition between sisters is pretty common and the added flair of drama makes it really fun to watch. The supporting characters' silly antics also add to the fun.

This award-winning Israeli film shows the life of two high school sisters, who are always in competition with each other and constantly struggle to identify with their individual identify and still appreciate each other.

I really like the expressiveness and charm of these characters. Each has its own quirks that stand out, such as the leading character Michal's insecurity, which is so obvious on her face and in so many other ways.

The background music is used in dramatic moments in a very cheeky, fun way. What stands out is the use of music at times when a problem is attempting to be resolved. It also stands out for the transitional and high moments. The main characters, the sisters, are very good at the dramatic personalities required for this show and it adds to the cute and silly high school drama that ensues.

The message of this film is to not let your personal insecurities get in the way of your relationships with your loved ones.

I give My Sister Skipped a Grade 5 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 8 to18. The dialogue is in Hebrew with English includes subtitles. Reviewed by Melissa M. and Julie S., KIDS FIRST! Jurors
KIDS FIRST!® Kid Jurors say - My Sister Skipped a Grade is so cute. The kids are pretty relatable in a very dramatic way. The competition between sisters is pretty common and the added flair of drama makes it really fun to watch. The supporting characters' silly antics also add to the fun.

This award-winning Israeli film shows the life of two high school sisters, who are always in competition with each other and constantly struggle to identify with their individual identify and still appreciate each other.

I really like the expressiveness and charm of these characters. Each has its own quirks that stand out, such as the leading character Michal's insecurity, which is so obvious on her face and in so many other ways.

The background music is used in dramatic moments in a very cheeky, fun way. What stands out is the use of music at times when a problem is attempting to be resolved. It also stands out for the transitional and high moments. The main characters, the sisters, are very good at the dramatic personalities required for this show and it adds to the cute and silly high school drama that ensues.

The message of this film is to not let your personal insecurities get in the way of your relationships with your loved ones.

I give My Sister Skipped a Grade 5 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 8 to18. The dialogue is in Hebrew with English includes subtitles. Reviewed by Melissa M. and Julie S., KIDS FIRST! Jurors
Runtime: 25 minutes Juror Recommended Age: 8-18 Suggested Retail Price: $ Media: VIDEO



This title is in the KIDS FIRST! Film Festival - it may not be a regular, endorsed title
BORDERLESS - BEHRAD SAHEBGHARANI
Series: FOREIGN SHORT, AGE 12-18
Description - The story is about a teenage girl named Delaram who has Down syndrome, and because of the genetic disorder that has caused her particular appearance and limited verbal expression; normal children and society think of her as mentally retarded. Delaram wants their judgments that, in her view, have created a border between them, to be removed.
KIDS FIRST!® Adult Jurors say - Borderless has such a beautiful and unique concept. It is a beautiful and relevant film and addresses an issue that most of us know very little about. What's appealing is that there are many individuals that can relate to the feelings of the actress. It can also help the families to understand a little bit of how people with Down Syndrome might feel sometimes, and to work to decrease the "borders" around them so they can connect with each other in a better way.

The storyline follows a girl with Down Syndrome who narrates her daily life from a personal point of view. Her relationships are explored, and how she deals with her "borders" with others. The major plot twist at the end adds to the already emotional storyline.

The story is engaging. It seems to portray the feelings of a person with Down Syndrome very accurately. I like how it focuses on her relationships with her mother and her peers, and how it shows the reality that many people have to face over a condition that they did not have any kind of control over. The major plot twist at the end is very emotional, and it shows two perspectives: one of the individuals with Down Syndrome as well as the perspective of those around them. This has a huge impact on how people do not know what is going on in someone's mind, and that judgment should not be the way to react over something that we are not familiar with.

The camera work is great. Some show the culture of Iran where the film takes place. As someone who is not familiar with Iranian culture, that is very interesting to observe it. The scenes between the daughter and the mother are touching, and show the unconditional love that parents should have toward their children, even if they have different situations than other children. The attire is typical of those that live in that part of the world. I really enjoyed the representation of the culture. The sets are very interesting. They show daily life in the country of Iran and include a variety of sets: home, school, streets and similar. The background music enhances each scene, as it changes according to emotions in each scene. When the actress feels discriminated against and lonely, the music became slow and low. When she talks with her mother or does something that made her happy, the music wistful joyful and uplifting.

The actors all deliver great performances. The relationship between the mother and the daughter is particularly well portrayed and shows their warm relationship. The little girl who is her friend is delightful. I was shocked when we discover that she is an imaginary friend. At no point of the movie did I question whether she was real or not.

There are two major messages of the film. The first one is that people with Down Syndrome are not a burden or have any kind of restriction in living a regular life. They are not abnormal; they only have a different pace in life. They deserve the same treatment and respect as we all do as human beings in this planet. The second message is that people should not discriminate or feel threated by someone who looks different or behaves differently than they do. When they do, they create borders that are hard to deal with for those who already have other concerns in their lives.

This film made me want to learn more about Down Syndrome and all the progress that has been made into learning about the condition. Also, it created an interest in learning about individuals with Down Syndrome that have achieved things that were against the odds for them. The part when the girl is learning and practicing the piano was very moving for me. Now I know that the little friend was imaginary, which means that the main girl was alone when she was playing the piano. This means that she was in fact learning during the music class, but maybe she felt intimated by her classmates or was not given the opportunity to practice like the others. By playing the piano alone, it shows that she has a functional mind that remembers the classes (just like everyone else) and that she really wants to do something for herself, something that makes her happy. It is a touchingly beautiful scene. I could not find any information on the actors, so I cannot comment on them individually.

I give Borderless 5 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 12 to 18, plus adults. This film shows a condition that can happen in any family in the world. By showing this movie, exposure to the topic can create education in how to act and how to think about individuals with Down Syndrome. They are humans just as anyone else, and they deserve respect, opportunities and social interactions just like we all do. This would be particularly well suited for a festival that addresses human potential. Reviewed by David O., KIDS FIRST! Juror
KIDS FIRST!® Kid Jurors say - Borderless has such a beautiful and unique concept. It is a beautiful and relevant film and addresses an issue that most of us know very little about. What's appealing is that there are many individuals that can relate to the feelings of the actress. It can also help the families to understand a little bit of how people with Down Syndrome might feel sometimes, and to work to decrease the "borders" around them so they can connect with each other in a better way.

The storyline follows a girl with Down Syndrome who narrates her daily life from a personal point of view. Her relationships are explored, and how she deals with her "borders" with others. The major plot twist at the end adds to the already emotional storyline.

The story is engaging. It seems to portray the feelings of a person with Down Syndrome very accurately. I like how it focuses on her relationships with her mother and her peers, and how it shows the reality that many people have to face over a condition that they did not have any kind of control over. The major plot twist at the end is very emotional, and it shows two perspectives: one of the individuals with Down Syndrome as well as the perspective of those around them. This has a huge impact on how people do not know what is going on in someone's mind, and that judgment should not be the way to react over something that we are not familiar with.

The camera work is great. Some show the culture of Iran where the film takes place. As someone who is not familiar with Iranian culture, that is very interesting to observe it. The scenes between the daughter and the mother are touching, and show the unconditional love that parents should have toward their children, even if they have different situations than other children. The attire is typical of those that live in that part of the world. I really enjoyed the representation of the culture. The sets are very interesting. They show daily life in the country of Iran and include a variety of sets: home, school, streets and similar. The background music enhances each scene, as it changes according to emotions in each scene. When the actress feels discriminated against and lonely, the music became slow and low. When she talks with her mother or does something that made her happy, the music wistful joyful and uplifting.

The actors all deliver great performances. The relationship between the mother and the daughter is particularly well portrayed and shows their warm relationship. The little girl who is her friend is delightful. I was shocked when we discover that she is an imaginary friend. At no point of the movie did I question whether she was real or not.

There are two major messages of the film. The first one is that people with Down Syndrome are not a burden or have any kind of restriction in living a regular life. They are not abnormal; they only have a different pace in life. They deserve the same treatment and respect as we all do as human beings in this planet. The second message is that people should not discriminate or feel threated by someone who looks different or behaves differently than they do. When they do, they create borders that are hard to deal with for those who already have other concerns in their lives.

This film made me want to learn more about Down Syndrome and all the progress that has been made into learning about the condition. Also, it created an interest in learning about individuals with Down Syndrome that have achieved things that were against the odds for them. The part when the girl is learning and practicing the piano was very moving for me. Now I know that the little friend was imaginary, which means that the main girl was alone when she was playing the piano. This means that she was in fact learning during the music class, but maybe she felt intimated by her classmates or was not given the opportunity to practice like the others. By playing the piano alone, it shows that she has a functional mind that remembers the classes (just like everyone else) and that she really wants to do something for herself, something that makes her happy. It is a touchingly beautiful scene. I could not find any information on the actors, so I cannot comment on them individually.

I give Borderless 5 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 12 to 18, plus adults. This film shows a condition that can happen in any family in the world. By showing this movie, exposure to the topic can create education in how to act and how to think about individuals with Down Syndrome. They are humans just as anyone else, and they deserve respect, opportunities and social interactions just like we all do. This would be particularly well suited for a festival that addresses human potential. Reviewed by David O., KIDS FIRST! Juror
Runtime: 13 minutes Juror Recommended Age: 12-18 Suggested Retail Price: $ Media: VIDEO



This title is in the KIDS FIRST! Film Festival - it may not be a regular, endorsed title
REHAK - PIERRE B
Series: FOREIGN SHORT, AGES 6-18
Description - A young girl in her age of innocence discovers Rehak, a magical drawing hidden behind her bedroom wall.
KIDS FIRST!® Adult Jurors say - Director Pierre B. has an amazing way of bringing animated characters to life in his short film Rehak. In giving life to these characters, each displays a variety of emotions which makes them loveable to adults and children alike. Rehak allows viewers to appreciate childlike minds and imagination, and shows us how childhood memories can become important teachable moments.

Rehak and Boo Boo are the very best of friends, with an inseparable relationship, until their "Dream Team" becomes broken. Rehak remains a magical drawing stuck in time hidden behind her bedroom wall while life moves on for her beloved friend Boo Boo. Years pass until Rehak resurfaces and is found by a child named Lilli. The two seem to appreciate each other's company and each appears desperate for a new friend. Rehak shares with Lilli stories of the magical friendship she once shared with Boo Boo. Her stories are incredibly meaningful and filled with such entertainment.

I sincerely enjoyed how a magical drawing could inspire us to appreciate such small things in life. Our childlike imaginations have value and are not just for kids. They are worthy of being shared from generation to generation. The cinematography in Rehak is out of this world! The scenes transition so well between animation and live action which brings great life to the drawings. The film takes place within Lilli's bedroom which is dark and lonely. Once Rehak surfaces and tells stories of her past, the room seems to liven up with excitement. The music in Rehak is quite uplifting. In fact, it's the first thing I came to love about this short film. The songs are emotional, dramatic and entertaining, which adds so much to this film.

How a magical drawing comes to life and brings such meaning to a film is what I felt to be the most remarkable effect in Rehak. Imagination is not just for kids and deserves to be shared and passed down through generations. Lilli certainly adds so much to this short film, but the character that inspires us the most is Rehak. Rehak delivers such an important message. You can feel the emotions in Rehak's stories and she makes you want to jump right into your mom's lap and ask her to share her own stories of imaginative characters that she once held near and dear to her heart. After watching this short film, I wanted to know if my parents had any imaginary friends when they were younger. I sat down with them immediately and asked for details. My favorite part of the film is the reuniting of the "Dream Team." This scene brings about some drama and suspense and is soon replaced by joy and happiness. The producer and director of this film, Pierre B. has the most star power in Rehak. I would love to see more of his work.

The message in Rehak is that imagination is not just for kids. Imagination can inspire people of all ages.

I give Rehak 5 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 6-18 plus adults. This is a beautiful film for the family and offers such great teachings about imaginary friends, childhood, spirituality and education. Reviewed by Dominic D., KIDS FIRST! Film Critic
KIDS FIRST!® Kid Jurors say - Director Pierre B. has an amazing way of bringing animated characters to life in his short film Rehak. In giving life to these characters, each displays a variety of emotions which makes them loveable to adults and children alike. Rehak allows viewers to appreciate childlike minds and imagination, and shows us how childhood memories can become important teachable moments.

Rehak and Boo Boo are the very best of friends, with an inseparable relationship, until their "Dream Team" becomes broken. Rehak remains a magical drawing stuck in time hidden behind her bedroom wall while life moves on for her beloved friend Boo Boo. Years pass until Rehak resurfaces and is found by a child named Lilli. The two seem to appreciate each other's company and each appears desperate for a new friend. Rehak shares with Lilli stories of the magical friendship she once shared with Boo Boo. Her stories are incredibly meaningful and filled with such entertainment.

I sincerely enjoyed how a magical drawing could inspire us to appreciate such small things in life. Our childlike imaginations have value and are not just for kids. They are worthy of being shared from generation to generation. The cinematography in Rehak is out of this world! The scenes transition so well between animation and live action which brings great life to the drawings. The film takes place within Lilli's bedroom which is dark and lonely. Once Rehak surfaces and tells stories of her past, the room seems to liven up with excitement. The music in Rehak is quite uplifting. In fact, it's the first thing I came to love about this short film. The songs are emotional, dramatic and entertaining, which adds so much to this film.

How a magical drawing comes to life and brings such meaning to a film is what I felt to be the most remarkable effect in Rehak. Imagination is not just for kids and deserves to be shared and passed down through generations. Lilli certainly adds so much to this short film, but the character that inspires us the most is Rehak. Rehak delivers such an important message. You can feel the emotions in Rehak's stories and she makes you want to jump right into your mom's lap and ask her to share her own stories of imaginative characters that she once held near and dear to her heart. After watching this short film, I wanted to know if my parents had any imaginary friends when they were younger. I sat down with them immediately and asked for details. My favorite part of the film is the reuniting of the "Dream Team." This scene brings about some drama and suspense and is soon replaced by joy and happiness. The producer and director of this film, Pierre B. has the most star power in Rehak. I would love to see more of his work.

The message in Rehak is that imagination is not just for kids. Imagination can inspire people of all ages.

I give Rehak 5 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 6-18 plus adults. This is a beautiful film for the family and offers such great teachings about imaginary friends, childhood, spirituality and education. Reviewed by Dominic D., KIDS FIRST! Film Critic
Runtime: 7 minutes Juror Recommended Age: 6-18 Suggested Retail Price: $ Media: VIDEO



This title is in the KIDS FIRST! Film Festival - it may not be a regular, endorsed title
FORGOTTEN WORLD, THE - MIKAEL KYSTER
Series: FOREIGN SHORT, AGES 8 -12
Description - Two brothers go on an adventure to save their dying little sister. Danish dialogue with English subtitles.
KIDS FIRST!® Adult Jurors say - I love how The Forgotten World shows the value of the relationships of the siblings! It is appealing because it is constant action and movement. The kids' imaginations and their youth make it really fun to watch. I really enjoyed the storyline.

The story follows two brothers who go on an adventure trying to save their dying little sister. The kids get in a disagreement and Bastian get his feelings really hurt. His sister and his mom try to cheer him up and they start to play a different game. Bastian's character evolves into being brave in the process of this high stakes game.

I like the story and how the kids use their imagination and how the mom contributes to make the brothers work together in the game to save their sister. The camerawork is quite good, using low angle shots showing Bastian laying on the ground and Selma behind him to help define how defeated and low he is feeling. The same shot is used when they give the sister the antidote. The shaky camera also adds to the fast action confusion effectively.

What I like about the sets and locations, which are mostly outside, allow the kids to run about. The background music pinpoints strong and slower moments effectively. The special effects are used quite well, starting at the beginning with fake gun shows and later to show land mines. They are not very believable, but work for the storyline.

The characters are played well. Bastian Kyster plays himself and show great expression, especially his highs and lows. Elias Kyster also plays himself and shows sincerity. Selma Kyster, also playing herself, is a good fit because she relates well to the two boys. The production designer stands out because of the carefully designed surroundings. The director also stands out because of the shaky camera use that shows the motion so well. My favorite part is when the little girl gives her hair pin to Bastian for good luck because she wants him to be happy and also the ending, which comes to a satisfactory conclusion.

The message of the film is to persevere; push yourself to be better and never give up. You should know that there is a lot of gun play in this film - pretend guns, but still guns.

I give The Forgotten World 3.5 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 8 to 12, plus adults. Reviewed by Melissa M., KIDS FIRST! Juror
KIDS FIRST!® Kid Jurors say - I love how The Forgotten World shows the value of the relationships of the siblings! It is appealing because it is constant action and movement. The kids' imaginations and their youth make it really fun to watch. I really enjoyed the storyline.

The story follows two brothers who go on an adventure trying to save their dying little sister. The kids get in a disagreement and Bastian get his feelings really hurt. His sister and his mom try to cheer him up and they start to play a different game. Bastian's character evolves into being brave in the process of this high stakes game.

I like the story and how the kids use their imagination and how the mom contributes to make the brothers work together in the game to save their sister. The camerawork is quite good, using low angle shots showing Bastian laying on the ground and Selma behind him to help define how defeated and low he is feeling. The same shot is used when they give the sister the antidote. The shaky camera also adds to the fast action confusion effectively.

What I like about the sets and locations, which are mostly outside, allow the kids to run about. The background music pinpoints strong and slower moments effectively. The special effects are used quite well, starting at the beginning with fake gun shows and later to show land mines. They are not very believable, but work for the storyline.

The characters are played well. Bastian Kyster plays himself and show great expression, especially his highs and lows. Elias Kyster also plays himself and shows sincerity. Selma Kyster, also playing herself, is a good fit because she relates well to the two boys. The production designer stands out because of the carefully designed surroundings. The director also stands out because of the shaky camera use that shows the motion so well. My favorite part is when the little girl gives her hair pin to Bastian for good luck because she wants him to be happy and also the ending, which comes to a satisfactory conclusion.

The message of the film is to persevere; push yourself to be better and never give up. You should know that there is a lot of gun play in this film - pretend guns, but still guns.

I give The Forgotten World 3.5 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 8 to 12, plus adults. Reviewed by Melissa M., KIDS FIRST! Juror
Runtime: 26 minutes Juror Recommended Age: 8-12 Suggested Retail Price: $ Media: VIDEO



This title is in the KIDS FIRST! Film Festival - it may not be a regular, endorsed title
FALSE TEETH - KIM KYUNG JU
Series: FOREIGN SHORT, AGES 7-12
Description - Han Young Soon, an old woman, loses her false teeth, Her grandson has taken them. She is going to take profile pictures at a picture studio. Her grandson runs to return her teeth to her before she arrives at the photo studio.
KIDS FIRST!® Adult Jurors say - False Teeth is a very sweet story that focuses on the love of an older Korean woman and her grandson. The story is about a young boy who finds playing with his grandmother's false teeth is fun, to the point of distraction. However, when he loses them, just before his grandmother is scheduled to take a portrait at a photography studio, it's a problem.

This short film gives us a lot of insight into Korean culture as we follow the boy and his family going about their daily activities and watching the grandmother take care of her false teeth. The camera work is very well done, with clear shots of their home and community. Watching the grandmother walk through the town shows us the village where this story takes place in rural Korea, a small town amongst vast fields and forests. I enjoyed seeing a part of the world not often represented in media. The little boy and his grandmother have a charming relationship that is sweet, believable and, at times, silly. The grandma's easy-going disposition and her love are the underlying theme of this story. She makes me smile, especially how she handles her situation with the missing teeth when shooting her portrait. Her grandson's mischievousness and light-heartedness abound and you can't help but giggle at him also.

The message of the film is that the best smile is a smile of love.

I give False Teeth 4 out of 5 stars and recommend this for ages 7 to 12, plus adults. The dialogue is in Korean with English subtitles. Reviewed by Cassidy S. and Julie S., KIDS FIRST! Jurors.
KIDS FIRST!® Kid Jurors say - False Teeth is a very sweet story that focuses on the love of an older Korean woman and her grandson. The story is about a young boy who finds playing with his grandmother's false teeth is fun, to the point of distraction. However, when he loses them, just before his grandmother is scheduled to take a portrait at a photography studio, it's a problem.

This short film gives us a lot of insight into Korean culture as we follow the boy and his family going about their daily activities and watching the grandmother take care of her false teeth. The camera work is very well done, with clear shots of their home and community. Watching the grandmother walk through the town shows us the village where this story takes place in rural Korea, a small town amongst vast fields and forests. I enjoyed seeing a part of the world not often represented in media. The little boy and his grandmother have a charming relationship that is sweet, believable and, at times, silly. The grandma's easy-going disposition and her love are the underlying theme of this story. She makes me smile, especially how she handles her situation with the missing teeth when shooting her portrait. Her grandson's mischievousness and light-heartedness abound and you can't help but giggle at him also.

The message of the film is that the best smile is a smile of love.

I give False Teeth 4 out of 5 stars and recommend this for ages 7 to 12, plus adults. The dialogue is in Korean with English subtitles. Reviewed by Cassidy S. and Julie S., KIDS FIRST! Jurors.
Runtime: 14 minutes Juror Recommended Age: 7-12 Suggested Retail Price: $ Media: VIDEO



This title is in the KIDS FIRST! Film Festival - it may not be a regular, endorsed title
COOL THE CLIMATE! - DENIS THOMOPOULOS
Series: INDIE SHORT, AGES 3-8
Description - Simon the Hippo and friends go on a song-filled adventure while learning about the world's changing climate, the role that carbon dioxide and methane play, and the good green habits we can all develop to help cool the climate. Along their way the animals find out about topics such as the Greenhouse Effect, the Food Chain, the "Three Rs" (Reducing, Reusing, Recycling), Composting, and Carbon Offsetting. Willing to face the climate crisis, the animal friends then take the steps to help cool the climate - and urge us humans to do the same!
KIDS FIRST!® Adult Jurors say - Cool the Climate can be a very helpful film to kids on climate change. The animation and characters are bright and colorful, the voice overs are very clear. It definitely suits a younger audience and teaches them things that they may not already know that are relevant to climate change.

This film is an explanatory film about climate change and how it works, different symptoms, and how to prevent it. It includes lots of songs that illustrate some of the common causes of climate change.

I love the bright colored animation and the characters. I like how it explains the causes of climate change, and gives examples. I like all the voiceover actors' voices except one, which is slightly grating. The animation and use of real features of the countries they talk about are excellent. The music is fun and well produced. The voice-over actors include Traylor Howard, Peter Giles, James Makawa, Brian Van Holt, Courtney Watkins, Angela Ledgerwood, Kate Hickey, Tiffany Lerman, The Ferrare family and the Thomopoulos family.

The message of this film is that it is really important to keep our planet clean, that climate change causes a lot of destruction to our world and a lot of things contribute to climate change. The call to action is that we need to step it up and save our planet.

I give Cool the Climate 3.5 out of 5 stars and recommend it to ages 3 to 8. Reviewed by Julie S. and Tiana S., KIDS FIRST! Jurors.
KIDS FIRST!® Kid Jurors say - Cool the Climate can be a very helpful film to kids on climate change. The animation and characters are bright and colorful, the voice overs are very clear. It definitely suits a younger audience and teaches them things that they may not already know that are relevant to climate change.

This film is an explanatory film about climate change and how it works, different symptoms, and how to prevent it. It includes lots of songs that illustrate some of the common causes of climate change.

I love the bright colored animation and the characters. I like how it explains the causes of climate change, and gives examples. I like all the voiceover actors' voices except one, which is slightly grating. The animation and use of real features of the countries they talk about are excellent. The music is fun and well produced. The voice-over actors include Traylor Howard, Peter Giles, James Makawa, Brian Van Holt, Courtney Watkins, Angela Ledgerwood, Kate Hickey, Tiffany Lerman, The Ferrare family and the Thomopoulos family.

The message of this film is that it is really important to keep our planet clean, that climate change causes a lot of destruction to our world and a lot of things contribute to climate change. The call to action is that we need to step it up and save our planet.

I give Cool the Climate 3.5 out of 5 stars and recommend it to ages 3 to 8. Reviewed by Julie S. and Tiana S., KIDS FIRST! Jurors.
Runtime: 29 minutes Juror Recommended Age: 3-8 Suggested Retail Price: $ Media: VIDEO



This title is in the KIDS FIRST! Film Festival - it may not be a regular, endorsed title
ATARI - SABA HAMZAVIAN
Series: FOREIGN SHORT, AGES 10-15
Description - The story is about a teenage boy that his father promised him an Atari...
KIDS FIRST!® Adult Jurors say - Atari is a simple yet beautifully tailored film that kids will love. Though the color correction makes the film murky and grey, Atari's plot and moral make up for this. Atari follows a boy in an Iranian town who really wants an Atari. His father promises that he will buy him an Atari on his pilgrimage to Mecca, where the video game is far cheaper. But several challenges ensue, and the boy realizes the value of being grateful for what he has, rather than pining for what he wants.

The storyline might be simplistic, or what some would consider a template-plot, but the lead actor (unnamed) executes each part of the story convincingly. This short film has a resounding lesson that is clearly delivered. The variety of shots in Atari is awesome; the one thing that I noticed that is a bit odd is the color correction. It seems to be toned to grayscale in all but one or two scenes, and that undermine the beautiful storyline, settings and emotions being felt. Even in happy moments, the grey screen takes away some of the joy the viewer feels for the main character. That being said, I especially like the shots where the main character looks down into the game room where other kids are playing on their Atari or SEGA consoles.

All of the clothes the characters in this film wear (t-shirts, jeans, chadors and hijabs) fit the time period and storyline of Atari. The setting for this film is super unique and adds so much to the movie. Farhad Fadakar's portrayal of Iran is very different from the traditional Western image. All of the settings in this film are beautiful! Mosques, mud-brick buildings, the Iranian countryside, roadside shops and even signs congratulating politicians for being elected to the Qanat Council (the group of people who oversee the management of the UNESCO-certified Persian qanat irrigation system). Wow!

The music perfectly underscores the actions of the main characters - slower, elevator-style music for scenic panoramas and suspenseful, deeper tracks for eventful sequences enhance the viewing experience. Farhad Fadakar is the director, writer and producer of Atari. The actors are not named. However, every member of the crew and cast truly perform outstandingly in their individual roles. The main character, despite not showing too many overt emotions as is consistent with Western theatre, skillfully acts his part. Fadakar shines in the production department; his cinematography and the way all of the shots blend together show his prowess. One thing that I noticed: one of the characters says that men don't cry, a saying which is slightly emotionally insensitive and stereotypical. But I think that's the only major red flag I noticed. I love the scenes in the Iranian village! The mud-brick buildings, dark passageways and ethos of Persian culture all contribute to making Atari a wonderful short. The message is "being grateful for the things you have is better than pining for the things you don't."

I give Atari 4 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 5 to 18. Atari has a great plot, above average cinematography, and is overall a superb film for younger kids to watch! It would be particularly suitable for a venue wanting to show films that address Iranian or Arabic culture. Reviewed by Eshaan M., KIDS FIRST! Film Critic
KIDS FIRST!® Kid Jurors say - Farhad Fadakar's portrayal of Iran is very different from the traditional Western image. All of the settings in this film are beautiful! Mosques, mud-brick buildings, the Iranian countryside, roadside shops and even signs congratulating politicians for being elected to the Qanat Council (the group of people who oversee the management of the UNESCO-certified Persian qanat irrigation system). Wow!

The music perfectly underscores the actions of the main characters - slower, elevator-style music for scenic panoramas and suspenseful, deeper tracks for eventful sequences enhance the viewing experience. Farhad Fadakar is the director, writer and producer of Atari. The actors are not named. However, every member of the crew and cast truly perform outstandingly in their individual roles. The main character, despite not showing too many overt emotions as is consistent with Western theatre, skillfully acts his part. Fadakar shines in the production department; his cinematography and the way all of the shots blend together show his prowess. One thing that I noticed: one of the characters says that men don't cry, a saying which is slightly emotionally insensitive and stereotypical. But I think that's the only major red flag I noticed. I love the scenes in the Iranian village! The mud-brick buildings, dark passageways and ethos of Persian culture all contribute to making Atari a wonderful short. The message is "being grateful for the things you have is better than pining for the things you don't."

I give Atari 4 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 5 to 18. Atari has a great plot, above average cinematography, and is overall a superb film for younger kids to watch! It would be particularly suitable for a venue wanting to show films that address Iranian or Arabic culture. Reviewed by Eshaan M., KIDS FIRST! Film Critic
Runtime: 15 minutes Juror Recommended Age: 5-18 Suggested Retail Price: $ Media: VIDEO



This title is in the KIDS FIRST! Film Festival - it may not be a regular, endorsed title
HEALING DANCE, THE - SHAELYN JOHNSTON
Series: FOREIGN SHORT, AGES 10-15
Description - Rosie is preparing to dance in her first pow wow, but after Nookomis tells her the origin story of jingle dancing, she worries that she's not as ready as she thought she was. The drums are calling, but will Rosie answer them?
KIDS FIRST!® Adult Jurors say - I like the short animated film, The Healing Dance, because it is full of culture and brings out many messages relating to important and spiritual topics. The little girl is drawn to the music of the dance and learns about its healing origins in this film. Her grandma encourages her to get out and dance with her heart, to not think about it too much. The girl overcomes her fear and helps heal her community not just from physical sickness, but mental also.

A young girl of Native American descent, Rosie, learns the story behind a dance she is most fond of. Her grandmother tells her that a long time ago a girl was very sick and the father of that girl dreamed about women dancing in special dresses. The man then made the dresses and had the women of the tribe do the dance, which healed the girl. The little girl then participates in the dance and helps her people.

I like that this film includes some history and not only focuses on the one little girl the whole time. The animation is quite detailed, reflecting the culture. The costumes when the traditional festivities happen are traditional tribal clothing, which are very interesting. The background music is primarily drumming. The music and the dancing are what drives the girl to participate in the activities. Rosie is played by Kailani Austin; Nookomis by Monica M. Benso; the mother by Nicole Cardinal; the father by Douglas Treloar. The voice acting by all is quite good. This short film taught me about the healing dance and what its purpose is. My favorite part is when Rosie pushes away her fears and starts dancing from her heart. Its only short-coming is that it is not full-range animation. I know that will be a draw back for some viewers. I wish the filmmaker had engaged an animator for this so it would have full motion. It tells such a beautiful story, but the lack of full animation holds it back.

This film tells a story of lessons, beliefs, and culture. The message is about learning the importance of culture and realizing that nothing should hold you back from pursuing something dear to you and your family.

I give The Healing Dance 3 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 2 to 11. I like that it talks a lot about Native Americans and a little bit of the government's affects on them culturally. Reviewed by W., KIDS FIRST! Juror.
KIDS FIRST!® Kid Jurors say - I like the short animated film, The Healing Dance, because it is full of culture and brings out many messages relating to important and spiritual topics. The little girl is drawn to the music of the dance and learns about its healing origins in this film. Her grandma encourages her to get out and dance with her heart, to not think about it too much. The girl overcomes her fear and helps heal her community not just from physical sickness, but mental also.

A young girl of Native American descent, Rosie, learns the story behind a dance she is most fond of. Her grandmother tells her that a long time ago a girl was very sick and the father of that girl dreamed about women dancing in special dresses. The man then made the dresses and had the women of the tribe do the dance, which healed the girl. The little girl then participates in the dance and helps her people.

I like that this film includes some history and not only focuses on the one little girl the whole time. The animation is quite detailed, reflecting the culture. The costumes when the traditional festivities happen are traditional tribal clothing, which are very interesting. The background music is primarily drumming. The music and the dancing are what drives the girl to participate in the activities. Rosie is played by Kailani Austin; Nookomis by Monica M. Benso; the mother by Nicole Cardinal; the father by Douglas Treloar. The voice acting by all is quite good. This short film taught me about the healing dance and what its purpose is. My favorite part is when Rosie pushes away her fears and starts dancing from her heart. Its only short-coming is that it is not full-range animation. I know that will be a draw back for some viewers. I wish the filmmaker had engaged an animator for this so it would have full motion. It tells such a beautiful story, but the lack of full animation holds it back.

This film tells a story of lessons, beliefs, and culture. The message is about learning the importance of culture and realizing that nothing should hold you back from pursuing something dear to you and your family.

I give The Healing Dance 3 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 2 to 11. I like that it talks a lot about Native Americans and a little bit of the government's affects on them culturally. Reviewed by W., KIDS FIRST! Juror.
Runtime: 4 minutes Juror Recommended Age: 2-11 Suggested Retail Price: $ Media: VIDEO



This title is in the KIDS FIRST! Film Festival - it may not be a regular, endorsed title
LETTER TO MARIE - RALF GIESECKE
Series: FOREIGN SHORT, AGES 10-18
Description - Sometimes important words of the past find a way to you. And sometimes they change your future.
KIDS FIRST!® Adult Jurors say - I really enjoyed Letter to Marie; every aspect of it is brilliantly executed. The sound design, the music, the cinematography all create a transcendent cinematic experience in just a few minutes. A wonderful life lesson is learned by the protagonist and audience; all of these elements make Letter to Marie worth the watch. This short film follows a young adult cleaning her family's garden to prepare it for selling. Along the way she finds a letter from her great grandfather and discovers a lesson she had once struggled to see - the importance of family.

I enjoyed the storyline a great deal and how the story is propelled forward by the written letter. It creates an emphasis on the words of the writer and allows the audience to fully hear the lessons being taught.

The cinematography is absolutely what sold me on this short film. From the first shot, the beautiful stills are completely compelling. The garden was a perfect location for the film. The small pond connecting perfectly to the section in the letter about water, and the true connections to nature are evident by the beautiful scenery. The background music and sound effects are excellent. I love how the music is louder through the headphones when we are in the protagonist perspective, and quieter when we are not. My favorite part of the film is how the music and sound design are executed.

The writer/director Ralf Giesecke had an extraordinary vision for this film and executes it exceptionally well. The writing of the letter perfectly conveys the theme in a way that isn't too obvious, and the direction beautifully relays that that theme. I felt as if I knew the grandfather by the time the film ends.

The film shows the beautiful cycle of family being one, like nature, and one that is unbreakable.

I give Letter to Marie 5 out of 5 stars and recommend it to ages 10 to 18, plus adults. It has great production quality, is engaging, and has a wonderful theme. One of my favorite of this season! Reviewed by Erin M., KIDS FIRST! Film Critic
KIDS FIRST!® Kid Jurors say - I really enjoyed Letter to Marie; every aspect of it is brilliantly executed. The sound design, the music, the cinematography all create a transcendent cinematic experience in just a few minutes. A wonderful life lesson is learned by the protagonist and audience; all of these elements make Letter to Marie worth the watch. This short film follows a young adult cleaning her family's garden to prepare it for selling. Along the way she finds a letter from her great grandfather and discovers a lesson she had once struggled to see - the importance of family.

I enjoyed the storyline a great deal and how the story is propelled forward by the written letter. It creates an emphasis on the words of the writer and allows the audience to fully hear the lessons being taught.

The cinematography is absolutely what sold me on this short film. From the first shot, the beautiful stills are completely compelling. The garden was a perfect location for the film. The small pond connecting perfectly to the section in the letter about water, and the true connections to nature are evident by the beautiful scenery. The background music and sound effects are excellent. I love how the music is louder through the headphones when we are in the protagonist perspective, and quieter when we are not. My favorite part of the film is how the music and sound design are executed.

The writer/director Ralf Giesecke had an extraordinary vision for this film and executes it exceptionally well. The writing of the letter perfectly conveys the theme in a way that isn't too obvious, and the direction beautifully relays that that theme. I felt as if I knew the grandfather by the time the film ends.

The film shows the beautiful cycle of family being one, like nature, and one that is unbreakable.

I give Letter to Marie 5 out of 5 stars and recommend it to ages 10 to 18, plus adults. It has great production quality, is engaging, and has a wonderful theme. One of my favorite of this season! Reviewed by Erin M., KIDS FIRST! Film Critic
Runtime: 8 minutes Juror Recommended Age: 10-18 Suggested Retail Price: $ Media: VIDEO



This title is in the KIDS FIRST! Film Festival - it may not be a regular, endorsed title
AURORA - JO MEURIS
Series: INDIE SHORT, AGES 4-14
Description - Once upon a time, there was a little girl who fell in love with a beautiful horse named Aurora.

Expressively animated in a naive drawing-style that evokes children's drawings and the texture of storybook illustrations, Aurora is a bittersweet story about love, friendship, and growing up.
KIDS FIRST!® Adult Jurors say - Aurora is a powerful short animated film that tackles the bittersweet ache of growing up and maturing. Growing up happens so quickly and, despite how quickly it goes by, the memories of childhood stick with you for the long haul. For Jojo the idea of making a new friend is alarming. In such a short time the film manages to deliver the message that growing old doesn't mean growing apart, and making new friends doesn't mean replacing the old ones.

The storyline follows a young girl named Jojo who befriends a horse named Aurora. When Aurora is given away, Jojo's heart breaks. As time passes the young girl learns to cope with the ache of growing up and missing a friend.

The premise of this story is one that anyone can able to relate to - a simple story about a young girl and her horse translates to anyone's personal story about their missed love one. Everything starts so vibrantly colored. However, in one scene everything is different. When consoled by her family, everything is gray except Jojo's hair bows and her heart. The one distinct portion of the costuming is the set of bows at the end of her hair. These accentuate Jojo's vibrancy and youth. The simple set compliments the story. The set comprises green grass and apple trees.

The music heavily impacts the way we feel about the scenes. During a sad moment the octave is taken down and we experience that sadness along with Jojo. Bravo to Jo Meuris herself for an outstanding story and lovable narration. The crisp art style makes this animation perfect for the big screen.

The message of this film is: growing up doesn't mean forgetting your childhood; you grow from your experiences. As an adult, Jojo closes her eyes and goes back to a place with old friends. It is there that we see Aurora once again.

I give Aurora 4 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 4 to 14, plus adults. Reviewed by Stephanie O., KIDS FIRST! Adult Juror
KIDS FIRST!® Kid Jurors say - Aurora is a powerful short animated film that tackles the bittersweet ache of growing up and maturing. Growing up happens so quickly and, despite how quickly it goes by, the memories of childhood stick with you for the long haul. For Jojo the idea of making a new friend is alarming. In such a short time the film manages to deliver the message that growing old doesn't mean growing apart, and making new friends doesn't mean replacing the old ones.

The storyline follows a young girl named Jojo who befriends a horse named Aurora. When Aurora is given away, Jojo's heart breaks. As time passes the young girl learns to cope with the ache of growing up and missing a friend.

The premise of this story is one that anyone can able to relate to - a simple story about a young girl and her horse translates to anyone's personal story about their missed love one. Everything starts so vibrantly colored. However, in one scene everything is different. When consoled by her family, everything is gray except Jojo's hair bows and her heart. The one distinct portion of the costuming is the set of bows at the end of her hair. These accentuate Jojo's vibrancy and youth. The simple set compliments the story. The set comprises green grass and apple trees.

The music heavily impacts the way we feel about the scenes. During a sad moment the octave is taken down and we experience that sadness along with Jojo. Bravo to Jo Meuris herself for an outstanding story and lovable narration. The crisp art style makes this animation perfect for the big screen.

The message of this film is: growing up doesn't mean forgetting your childhood; you grow from your experiences. As an adult, Jojo closes her eyes and goes back to a place with old friends. It is there that we see Aurora once again.

I give Aurora 4 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 4 to 14, plus adults. Reviewed by Stephanie O., KIDS FIRST! Adult Juror
Runtime: 5 minutes Juror Recommended Age: 4-14 Suggested Retail Price: $ Media: VIDEO



This title is in the KIDS FIRST! Film Festival - it may not be a regular, endorsed title
TALE OF TWO ICEBERGS, A - WC PRODUCTIONS
Series: INDIE SHORT, AGES 7-12
Description - Global warming doesn't just affect human families. Our tale tells the story of a mother/daughter "berg" who break off from their glacier. As they drift helplessly, slowly melting in globally warmed water, things really heat up. They must evade capture by greedy bottled water companies and find their way to cooler waters to save their lives.
KIDS FIRST!® Adult Jurors say - A Tale of Two Icebergs gives a kid-friendly and eye-opening insight about the dangers of global warming. In less than six minutes the film manages to inform and engage its audience. The stylized animation is distinctive and charming, which furthers the overall likeability of this animated short. We get nervous, relieved and hopeful for two icebergs. When I began to feel empathy for these inanimate protagonists, I knew the film was well executed.

A Tale of Two Icebergs is a short animated film about global warming. When a mother and daughter iceberg break off from the rest of their glacier, they must evade water bottle companies and find cool water to survive.

The story is very well organized. There is no time wasted. The film introduces its audience to the conflict as soon as it begins. As the film progresses we are introduced to the many complications that have resulted from global warming. In the beginning, there is one scene in particular that caught my attention. The camera slowly zooms in through tall glaciers, only to reveal the melting ice behind it. It is a very clever way to reveal the current damage. The film takes place in a place populated with glaciers. After global warming breaks them apart, the set becomes a large body of water. This location is expected and works well to deliver the story's message. The background music compliments the tone of the film. The moment we meet them, we begin rooting for Glacia and her daughter Crystal. We are given reasons to worry about both of the girls as soon as we realize the danger they are about to face. I was interested to learn that luxury water is sourced directly from icebergs. When a water bottling company selects Crystal as their next target, her mother thinks quickly and punctures the ship with her sharp-ended underside.

The highest quality setting for this animated film is 480p. I have to say that I am a little nervous to see how this film will play on the big screen.

The message of this film is that humans are causing danger to the environment and something needs to be done, soon!

I give A Tale of Two Icebergs 4 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 8 to 12. The film delivers an important message in a way that would capture and hold the attention of young viewers. Reviewed by Stephanie O., KIDS FIRST! Adult Juror.
KIDS FIRST!® Kid Jurors say - A Tale of Two Icebergs gives a kid-friendly and eye-opening insight about the dangers of global warming. In less than six minutes the film manages to inform and engage its audience. The stylized animation is distinctive and charming, which furthers the overall likeability of this animated short. We get nervous, relieved and hopeful for two icebergs. When I began to feel empathy for these inanimate protagonists, I knew the film was well executed.

A Tale of Two Icebergs is a short animated film about global warming. When a mother and daughter iceberg break off from the rest of their glacier, they must evade water bottle companies and find cool water to survive.

The story is very well organized. There is no time wasted. The film introduces its audience to the conflict as soon as it begins. As the film progresses we are introduced to the many complications that have resulted from global warming. In the beginning, there is one scene in particular that caught my attention. The camera slowly zooms in through tall glaciers, only to reveal the melting ice behind it. It is a very clever way to reveal the current damage. The film takes place in a place populated with glaciers. After global warming breaks them apart, the set becomes a large body of water. This location is expected and works well to deliver the story's message. The background music compliments the tone of the film. The moment we meet them, we begin rooting for Glacia and her daughter Crystal. We are given reasons to worry about both of the girls as soon as we realize the danger they are about to face. I was interested to learn that luxury water is sourced directly from icebergs. When a water bottling company selects Crystal as their next target, her mother thinks quickly and punctures the ship with her sharp-ended underside.

The highest quality setting for this animated film is 480p. I have to say that I am a little nervous to see how this film will play on the big screen.

The message of this film is that humans are causing danger to the environment and something needs to be done, soon!

I give A Tale of Two Icebergs 4 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 8 to 12. The film delivers an important message in a way that would capture and hold the attention of young viewers. Reviewed by Stephanie O., KIDS FIRST! Adult Juror.
Runtime: 6 minutes Juror Recommended Age: 7-12 Suggested Retail Price: $ Media: VIDEO



This title is in the KIDS FIRST! Film Festival - it may not be a regular, endorsed title
TALE OF TWO ICEBERGS, A: EPISODE 2 - WC PRODUCTIONS
Series: INDIE SHORT, AGES 7-12
Description - Mother and daughter icebergs, Glacia and Crystal, have been forced to break away from their glacier community in the Arctic Ocean, due to global warming and are now drifting for their lives. They have escaped certain death at the hands of the greedy " Iceberg Bottled Water Company" but now face an even greater enemy - warm ocean water that's melting them. A gang of walruses, however, might prove to be their saviors. Barry, the walrus leader, promises to steer them towards the Cold Stream, the purest, coldest, bluest water they've ever seen.
KIDS FIRST!® Adult Jurors say - people about the dangers of climate change. Through fun and clever characters, kids and adults alike can learn about one of the most dangerous threats to our livelihood.

The storyline follows a mother iceberg who joins a walrus and a seagull to find a better escape for her and her daughter from the evil water bottle company warming their seas.

I like the simplicity of the story and the way it could be easily followed by young people. The animation is 2D and fairly simple. At times the colors are a bit confusing, but for the most part the animation is well executed with interesting camera angles and shots that serve its purpose. The backgrounds are simple and allow you to focus on the characters. The voiceover talent is excellent with good definition between the different character's voices. They truly capture the essence of the animals and icebergs that they portray. I loved the dynamic between the mother and daughter icebergs. They are so cute and funny. This short film would work great in a classroom setting but is also suitable for 1:1 viewing. The theme of the film is about the importance of saving the environment before it is too late.

I give A Tale of Two Icebergs 4 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 7 to 12, plus adults. This would play well in KIDS FIRST! Film Festivals, particularly any that are focusing on the environment or climate change.

Reviewed by Erin M., KIDS FIRST! Film Critic
KIDS FIRST!® Kid Jurors say - people about the dangers of climate change. Through fun and clever characters, kids and adults alike can learn about one of the most dangerous threats to our livelihood.

The storyline follows a mother iceberg who joins a walrus and a seagull to find a better escape for her and her daughter from the evil water bottle company warming their seas.

I like the simplicity of the story and the way it could be easily followed by young people. The animation is 2D and fairly simple. At times the colors are a bit confusing, but for the most part the animation is well executed with interesting camera angles and shots that serve its purpose. The backgrounds are simple and allow you to focus on the characters. The voiceover talent is excellent with good definition between the different character's voices. They truly capture the essence of the animals and icebergs that they portray. I loved the dynamic between the mother and daughter icebergs. They are so cute and funny. This short film would work great in a classroom setting but is also suitable for 1:1 viewing. The theme of the film is about the importance of saving the environment before it is too late.

I give A Tale of Two Icebergs 4 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 7 to 12, plus adults. This would play well in KIDS FIRST! Film Festivals, particularly any that are focusing on the environment or climate change.

Reviewed by Erin M., KIDS FIRST! Film Critic
Runtime: 8 minutes Juror Recommended Age: 7-12 Suggested Retail Price: $ Media: VIDEO



This title is in the KIDS FIRST! Film Festival - it may not be a regular, endorsed title
WE ARE SILVER DAZZLERS - ROBERT SICO
Series: INDIE FEATURE, AGES 10-18
Description - Documentary about the dance team from Harlan High School in San Antonio, Texas, The Silver Dazzlers! Go on a journey with these amazing young ladies, and watch as they experience an incredible season that included dancing at the AT&T Center, the Alamodome, and of course, dancing for their school. Plus, see how an emotional football season changes the dance team forever, and why being a Silver Dazzler can be life changing. You think it's just learning how to dance...but it's so much more than that.
KIDS FIRST!® Adult Jurors say - I dug the central framing device of the dancers in We Are Silver Dazzlers, recounting and looking back at their team and their time there.

The storyline follows a dance team at Harlan High School in San Antonio called The Silver Dazzlers and the film explores what the team does from testimonials of the dancers and their coach. As a documentary, the camera work is pretty good although at times the color grading is off, as if there is filter over the footage. In particular, the scenes from performances lack boldness. Those seem to be from a single camera shooting from the stands and there's an imaginativeness missing from those scenes. However, keep in mind that it is a documentary, so they have to work with what they have.

What is inspiring is the insight from the dancers whose experience with the Silver Dazzlers is so much more than a hobby or an extracurricular. It truly helps shape who they will become and leaves behind lasting memories. The music is one of its shortcomings, although it has some excellent choices, not all are. For example the opening doesn't work very well because of the music. The wistful piano feels way too insincere. There's a needle drop during one of the more insightful moments when one of the dancers is overcome with emotion while being interviewed and a song called Human comes on and it feels way too sappy. I had no idea who the Silver Dazzlers were prior to viewing this film. Certainly the performances of the Silver Dazzlers are very impressive. It is a story exploring the efforts and skills of youth. At 90 minutes, it's a bit too long. At some points, it feels like a prolonged home video, because it doesn't reveal enough of a universal message to capture an audience outside of San Antonio.

I give We Are Silver Dazzlers 3 out of 5 stars and recommend it to ages 5 to 18, plus adults. It's a lovely coming-of-age film that would play well for tweens and teens. Reviewed by Benjamin P., KIDS FIRST! Film Critic
KIDS FIRST!® Kid Jurors say - I dug the central framing device of the dancers in We Are Silver Dazzlers, recounting and looking back at their team and their time there.

The storyline follows a dance team at Harlan High School in San Antonio called The Silver Dazzlers and the film explores what the team does from testimonials of the dancers and their coach. As a documentary, the camera work is pretty good although at times the color grading is off, as if there is filter over the footage. In particular, the scenes from performances lack boldness. Those seem to be from a single camera shooting from the stands and there's an imaginativeness missing from those scenes. However, keep in mind that it is a documentary, so they have to work with what they have.

What is inspiring is the insight from the dancers whose experience with the Silver Dazzlers is so much more than a hobby or an extracurricular. It truly helps shape who they will become and leaves behind lasting memories. The music is one of its shortcomings, although it has some excellent choices, not all are. For example the opening doesn't work very well because of the music. The wistful piano feels way too insincere. There's a needle drop during one of the more insightful moments when one of the dancers is overcome with emotion while being interviewed and a song called Human comes on and it feels way too sappy. I had no idea who the Silver Dazzlers were prior to viewing this film. Certainly the performances of the Silver Dazzlers are very impressive. It is a story exploring the efforts and skills of youth. At 90 minutes, it's a bit too long. At some points, it feels like a prolonged home video, because it doesn't reveal enough of a universal message to capture an audience outside of San Antonio.

I give We Are Silver Dazzlers 3 out of 5 stars and recommend it to ages 5 to 18, plus adults. It's a lovely coming-of-age film that would play well for tweens and teens. Reviewed by Benjamin P., KIDS FIRST! Film Critic
Runtime: 92 minutes Juror Recommended Age: 10-18 Suggested Retail Price: $ Media: VIDEO



This title is in the KIDS FIRST! Film Festival - it may not be a regular, endorsed title
SOCKZ THEATRE'S THREE LITTLE PIGS - CHRISTIAN PERRY CASTRO
Series: INDIE SHORT, AGES 2-8
Description - Three Pigs. Three houses. One wolf with an enormous lung capacity.
KIDS FIRST!® Adult Jurors say - Sockz Theatre's Three Little Pigs' set is whimsical. It's cool to see how different everyday materials are used. I also like how each characters has a certain instrument or music associated with it. It's a fun story, that is perfect for younger audiences.

The storyline tells the classic tale of the three little pigs, where three pigs each build a different type of house and the wolf tries to blow each one down. But it's told with sock puppets and a set made of everyday found objects.

I like how each pig has its own personality and shares a little about its house. The wolf has a couple of cute and funny lines, even though he's mean. The camera work pretty much stays the same the whole time and it's well executed. The costumes on the sock puppets are super cute, especially for the wolf. The wolf puppet has a bunch of cute details; I like that it is purple and yellow, like the Vikings. The set is adorable. It is fun to figure out what was used to make the background and props, because everything looks like it is made from stuff you might find around your house. There is background music attached to the characters and it sets a particular tone for what is going to happen next. The music used for the wolf, for example, has a bit of a scarier tone, so you know he's the villain. Eric Tsuchiyama and Christian Perry Castro are the dynamic duo of taking on multiple roles for this production - directing, writing and voice acting. My favorite parts are the set design and clever writing. I love the ending comment when the wolf delivers a funny line that plays on words.

The message of the film is about making smart decisions. It's beneficial to plan ahead and be prepared if something bad happens. Although this storyline isn't anything new, what is new is how the film shows that you can make cool-looking things from stuff that you already have.

I give Sockz Theatre's Three Little Pigs 4 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 2 to 8, plus adults. It's a fun, short, appealing film that tells a classic tale in a cute way with a very appealing set. And I love that it uses puppets, which you rarely see in films. Reviewed by Cadence G., KIDS FIRST! Film Critic
KIDS FIRST!® Kid Jurors say - Sockz Theatre's Three Little Pigs' set is whimsical. It's cool to see how different everyday materials are used. I also like how each characters has a certain instrument or music associated with it. It's a fun story, that is perfect for younger audiences.

The storyline tells the classic tale of the three little pigs, where three pigs each build a different type of house and the wolf tries to blow each one down. But it's told with sock puppets and a set made of everyday found objects.

I like how each pig has its own personality and shares a little about its house. The wolf has a couple of cute and funny lines, even though he's mean. The camera work pretty much stays the same the whole time and it's well executed. The costumes on the sock puppets are super cute, especially for the wolf. The wolf puppet has a bunch of cute details; I like that it is purple and yellow, like the Vikings. The set is adorable. It is fun to figure out what was used to make the background and props, because everything looks like it is made from stuff you might find around your house. There is background music attached to the characters and it sets a particular tone for what is going to happen next. The music used for the wolf, for example, has a bit of a scarier tone, so you know he's the villain. Eric Tsuchiyama and Christian Perry Castro are the dynamic duo of taking on multiple roles for this production - directing, writing and voice acting. My favorite parts are the set design and clever writing. I love the ending comment when the wolf delivers a funny line that plays on words.

The message of the film is about making smart decisions. It's beneficial to plan ahead and be prepared if something bad happens. Although this storyline isn't anything new, what is new is how the film shows that you can make cool-looking things from stuff that you already have.

I give Sockz Theatre's Three Little Pigs 4 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 2 to 8, plus adults. It's a fun, short, appealing film that tells a classic tale in a cute way with a very appealing set. And I love that it uses puppets, which you rarely see in films. Reviewed by Cadence G., KIDS FIRST! Film Critic
Runtime: 5 minutes Juror Recommended Age: 2-8 Suggested Retail Price: $ Media: VIDEO



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