KIDS FIRST! has endorsed 1648 total Video titles

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This title is in the KIDS FIRST! Film Festival - it may not be a regular, endorsed title
THE WAY YOU SMILE - BRICEN X
Series: STUDENT SHORT, AGES 8-18
Description - Malcolm promises his son Chance that they will go to his favorite arcade after school. However, when Malcolm takes some time after work to enjoy himself, he fails to pick up his son at school on time. Now the arcade has closed, and Chance is visibly upset. After a tense dinner, Malcolm tries to cheer up his son by building him a makeshift arcade in their living room instead. Despite this, Chance is still upset, and Malcolm finds out about the real issue that is affecting his son.
KIDS FIRST!® Adult Jurors say - I love The Way You Smile because it is realistic in so many ways. This film has a deep message that could help many people. It's an amazing film.

The story is about Malcolm (Patrick Keeffe) and his son Chance (Ethan Ergen). Malcolm promises Chance to take his son to the arcade after school, but Malcolm fails to pick him up on time and by the time he does, the arcade is closed. After a tense dinner, Malcom finds out that Chance is upset, not just about the arcade but has another issue.

I love how the story develops; you can tell the father and son have a connection from the beginning and that holds the film together. You really get a sense of the characters from the get go. The camera work is so good from the get go. In the beginning, the sides of the screen are blurry and that adds a good effect to the scene. It made me focus on the character more and how he is moving. I love the different sets and props, like when Malcom uses blankets, lights and games that Malcolm uses in the living room for Chance. The time of day helps establish the characters' moods; for example, when Malcolm is going to pick Chance up it is dark outside. The background music is great. I especially enjoyed the music playing when Malcolm takes Chance to work, especially when they both break out singing. The piece during the credits is also very beautiful. The lyrics fit the father-son bond. When Malcolm sets up the home arcade, the panoramic camera gives the effect of time passing as do the laps he runs around the house. The characters show their emotions in the first five seconds of the film. When Malcolm looks over to the other side of the bed and sighs, it made me want to keep watching to see what would happen next. When Chance runs away from the games and goes to his room, you sense there is more on his mind. It really touched me. It made me want to learn more about single parenting and how challenging it must be. It must take a lot of strength to talk to your child about being a single parent, and why that may be the case. My favorite part of the film is when Malcolm and Chance fall asleep on the couch. It's a powerful moment. The Director Bricen X should be complimented for making this story very real. I was so attached to the script because everything comes together and it is beautiful to watch! There are many known actors in this including Patrick Keeffe, Bricen X., O'Neil Henry, Alison Wright, Bren McElroy and more.

The message of this film is that the people who love you can always help you through hard times, if you let them, and that there are lots of ways to love someone.

I give The Way You Smile 5 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 8 to 18, plus adults. By Makena P., KIDS FIRST!
KIDS FIRST!® Kid Jurors say - I love The Way You Smile because it is realistic in so many ways. This film has a deep message that could help many people. It's an amazing film.

The story is about Malcolm (Patrick Keeffe) and his son Chance (Ethan Ergen). Malcolm promises Chance to take his son to the arcade after school, but Malcolm fails to pick him up on time and by the time he does, the arcade is closed. After a tense dinner, Malcom finds out that Chance is upset, not just about the arcade but has another issue.

I love how the story develops; you can tell the father and son have a connection from the beginning and that holds the film together. You really get a sense of the characters from the get go. The camera work is so good from the get go. In the beginning, the sides of the screen are blurry and that adds a good effect to the scene. It made me focus on the character more and how he is moving. I love the different sets and props, like when Malcom uses blankets, lights and games that Malcolm uses in the living room for Chance. The time of day helps establish the characters' moods; for example, when Malcolm is going to pick Chance up it is dark outside. The background music is great. I especially enjoyed the music playing when Malcolm takes Chance to work, especially when they both break out singing. The piece during the credits is also very beautiful. The lyrics fit the father-son bond. When Malcolm sets up the home arcade, the panoramic camera gives the effect of time passing as do the laps he runs around the house. The characters show their emotions in the first five seconds of the film. When Malcolm looks over to the other side of the bed and sighs, it made me want to keep watching to see what would happen next. When Chance runs away from the games and goes to his room, you sense there is more on his mind. It really touched me. It made me want to learn more about single parenting and how challenging it must be. It must take a lot of strength to talk to your child about being a single parent, and why that may be the case. My favorite part of the film is when Malcolm and Chance fall asleep on the couch. It's a powerful moment. The Director Bricen X should be complimented for making this story very real. I was so attached to the script because everything comes together and it is beautiful to watch! There are many known actors in this including Patrick Keeffe, Bricen X., O'Neil Henry, Alison Wright, Bren McElroy and more.

The message of this film is that the people who love you can always help you through hard times, if you let them, and that there are lots of ways to love someone.

I give The Way You Smile 5 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 8 to 18, plus adults. By Makena P., KIDS FIRST!
Runtime: 19 minutes Juror Recommended Age: 8-18 Suggested Retail Price: $ Media: VIDEO



This title is in the KIDS FIRST! Film Festival - it may not be a regular, endorsed title
SEBASTIANA - CLAUDIO MARTINS
Series: FOREIGN SHORT, AGES 5-12
Description - In a small and poor village in the interior of Brazil, a girl is born with a special gift that brings happiness to everyone. But when she grows it ends up bringing problems for many. A film adapted from the award winning book "Ela tem olhos de c�u" by Socorro Acioli.
KIDS FIRST!® Adult Jurors say - The Brazilian animated short, Sebastiana, is an adaptation of a children's book, Ela Tem Olhos de C�u by Socorro Acioli and is adorable. There is no narrative, but there is lots of crying, and for good reason. Sebastiana is a little baby girl who has "Eyes of the Sky" (loose translation) and whenever she cries, it rains!

Sebastiana takes a minute or two to understand, because it is a based on a folk tale from northern Brazil and reflects the lifestyle from that area. In the little village setting, the dry climate makes farming a tough task and there is a lot of poverty. The church plays its part in maintaining religious values and is the antagonist in this story. Sebastiana's gift is making the sky rain when she cries, which makes it hard on her family because now their gardens have too much rain (you know how often babies cry) and the church thinks she is cursed.

I love the animation in this film. It is brightly colored and portrays both the characters and their surrounding with a light touch. The background music takes its melodies from the folk tales of northern Brazil and is married to the animation in a most interesting way. Using native instruments - strings, accordion, keyboards and guitars - and "mickey mousing" the movements of the colorful two dimensional animation makes the flow seamless. Director Claudio Martins must have a big heart because all the children in this film are loving and so sweet.

The message of Sebastiana is that sometimes our gifts are also our drawbacks, but in the long run, things balance out as long as we love and are loved!

I give Sebastiana 4 stars out of 5 and recommend it for ages 5 to 12, plus adults. By Nancy K., KIDS FIRST!
KIDS FIRST!® Kid Jurors say - The Brazilian animated short, Sebastiana, is an adaptation of a children's book, Ela Tem Olhos de C�u by Socorro Acioli and is adorable. There is no narrative, but there is lots of crying, and for good reason. Sebastiana is a little baby girl who has "Eyes of the Sky" (loose translation) and whenever she cries, it rains!

Sebastiana takes a minute or two to understand, because it is a based on a folk tale from northern Brazil and reflects the lifestyle from that area. In the little village setting, the dry climate makes farming a tough task and there is a lot of poverty. The church plays its part in maintaining religious values and is the antagonist in this story. Sebastiana's gift is making the sky rain when she cries, which makes it hard on her family because now their gardens have too much rain (you know how often babies cry) and the church thinks she is cursed.

I love the animation in this film. It is brightly colored and portrays both the characters and their surrounding with a light touch. The background music takes its melodies from the folk tales of northern Brazil and is married to the animation in a most interesting way. Using native instruments - strings, accordion, keyboards and guitars - and "mickey mousing" the movements of the colorful two dimensional animation makes the flow seamless. Director Claudio Martins must have a big heart because all the children in this film are loving and so sweet.

The message of Sebastiana is that sometimes our gifts are also our drawbacks, but in the long run, things balance out as long as we love and are loved!

I give Sebastiana 4 stars out of 5 and recommend it for ages 5 to 12, plus adults. By Nancy K., KIDS FIRST!
Runtime: 14 minutes Juror Recommended Age: 5-12 Suggested Retail Price: $ Media: VIDEO



This title is in the KIDS FIRST! Film Festival - it may not be a regular, endorsed title
DREAMS SQUARED - BACACI SJENKI
Series: FOREIGN STUDENT SHORT, AGES 12-18
Description - After he dreamt of blue sheep, our hero finds himself in a nightmare's nest. There is a one way out, but will he be able to find it? Who is the spy here, and who is the real human?
KIDS FIRST!® Adult Jurors say - Dreams Squared is an interesting short student film that tells a confusing story through stop motion animation.

The storyline follows a character that falls asleep and dreams of blue sheep. He finds himself abducted by aliens and needs to figure out who is telling the truth about being a real human.

This film is cleverly animated using geometric shapes that create both the main character and the sets. The storyline is a bit confusing, but the subtitles help a bit. I can't say that the storyline is completely clear. As a big fan of stop motion animation, I found the execution of this film very impressive. There is clearly a lot of time allotted to creating the story with this type of tedious production. There is no background music per se, but there are lots of sound effects and voiceovers that are odd and quirky, sometimes they sound like a Greek chorus. The protagonist has a new sense of bravery at the conclusion of this film. The stop motion production is well done. This aspect is my favorite part of the film.

The message is to trust your instincts and avoid fake friends who may harm you.

I give Dreams Squared 4.5 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 12 to 18, plus adults. I think the storyline is too confusing for younger viewers. Also, younger children are unable to read subtitles.
KIDS FIRST!® Kid Jurors say - Dreams Squared is an interesting short student film that tells a confusing story through stop motion animation.

The storyline follows a character that falls asleep and dreams of blue sheep. He finds himself abducted by aliens and needs to figure out who is telling the truth about being a real human.

This film is cleverly animated using geometric shapes that create both the main character and the sets. The storyline is a bit confusing, but the subtitles help a bit. I can't say that the storyline is completely clear. As a big fan of stop motion animation, I found the execution of this film very impressive. There is clearly a lot of time allotted to creating the story with this type of tedious production. There is no background music per se, but there are lots of sound effects and voiceovers that are odd and quirky, sometimes they sound like a Greek chorus. The protagonist has a new sense of bravery at the conclusion of this film. The stop motion production is well done. This aspect is my favorite part of the film.

The message is to trust your instincts and avoid fake friends who may harm you.

I give Dreams Squared 4.5 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 12 to 18, plus adults. I think the storyline is too confusing for younger viewers. Also, younger children are unable to read subtitles.
Runtime: 3 minutes Juror Recommended Age: 12-18 Suggested Retail Price: $ Media: VIDEO



This title is in the KIDS FIRST! Film Festival - it may not be a regular, endorsed title
OTHER SIDE OF THE SHOW, THE - BACACI SJENKI
Series: FOREIGN STUDENT SHORT, AGES 8-18
Description - A peaceful morning coffee is interrupted by Lara's mysterious disappearance. Chief inspector interrogates a number of odd people trying to find her. But as they dig deeper, wondering what happened to Lara, they start doubting in Lara's existence altogether, even their own existence and reality itself...
KIDS FIRST!® Adult Jurors say - Action, suspense, and humor! The Other Of The Show is a student produced that that has a complex and invigorating plot line, particularly for such a short film. There are so much plot twists and interesting turns that the curiosity of the viewer is on constant high alert.

The film is narrated by an investigator intent on discovering how a girl disappeared. However, every witness points to the possibility of the absolute impossible and we are left to doubt Laura's existence altogether!

The plot of this film is definitely unusual and quirky. The camerawork is quite good; there are some shaky camerawork, but they sort of add to the storyline. The camera angles are varied throughout with a mix of range. The settings are typical for the story, from the theater to the caf�, to outdoor shots. The background music and sound effects works well; at the beginning there is a great selection of pop-type music that creates a very exciting vibe and later it is used for transitions or to help drive the action. The character development offers a series of unexpected and unanticipated plot twists. Not knowing who the key characters actually are is an interesting take. My favorite parts are the stereotypical scenes we are accustomed to seeing in films, created in a DIY sort of way, such as introducing the culprits by spinning around in a circle. This is such a fun and interesting film that incorporates aliens, books and action.

The message of the film is: anything is possible. Always consider the potential of an impossible circumstance. It does show kids doing risky things that kids might imitate; there are acts of violence with children fighting and some gun action. Note, the dialogue is in Croatian with English subtitles.

I give The Other Side Of The Show 4.5 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 8 to 18, plus adults. By Ashleigh C., KIDS FIRST!
KIDS FIRST!® Kid Jurors say - Action, suspense, and humor! The Other Of The Show is a student produced that that has a complex and invigorating plot line, particularly for such a short film. There are so much plot twists and interesting turns that the curiosity of the viewer is on constant high alert.

The film is narrated by an investigator intent on discovering how a girl disappeared. However, every witness points to the possibility of the absolute impossible and we are left to doubt Laura's existence altogether!

The plot of this film is definitely unusual and quirky. The camerawork is quite good; there are some shaky camerawork, but they sort of add to the storyline. The camera angles are varied throughout with a mix of range. The settings are typical for the story, from the theater to the caf�, to outdoor shots. The background music and sound effects works well; at the beginning there is a great selection of pop-type music that creates a very exciting vibe and later it is used for transitions or to help drive the action. The character development offers a series of unexpected and unanticipated plot twists. Not knowing who the key characters actually are is an interesting take. My favorite parts are the stereotypical scenes we are accustomed to seeing in films, created in a DIY sort of way, such as introducing the culprits by spinning around in a circle. This is such a fun and interesting film that incorporates aliens, books and action.

The message of the film is: anything is possible. Always consider the potential of an impossible circumstance. It does show kids doing risky things that kids might imitate; there are acts of violence with children fighting and some gun action. Note, the dialogue is in Croatian with English subtitles.

I give The Other Side Of The Show 4.5 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 8 to 18, plus adults. By Ashleigh C., KIDS FIRST!
Runtime: 8 minutes Juror Recommended Age: 8-18 Suggested Retail Price: $ Media: VIDEO



This title is in the KIDS FIRST! Film Festival - it may not be a regular, endorsed title
THEY'RE THE REASON - LILA KATZ
Series: STUDENT SHORT, AGES 5-18
Description - The healing power of human-canine connection in combatting anxiety and isolation for people of all ages, through the lens of mounting mental health crisis in teens, overcoming learning disabilities and isolation during Covid.
KIDS FIRST!® Adult Jurors say - As a dog owner, I like the student documentary film, They're the Reason, a lot! I relate with some of the stories because COVID forced me to attend sixth grade at home. When I feel sad that I am missing out on new experiences, my dog Khaleesi is always there for me. She knows when I am sad and cuddles with me whenever I need it.

This short film talks about how dogs can truly help with people's mental health. It shows four different teenagers with different health issues like ADHD, depression, dyspepsia or anxiety, and how their dogs help them cope. Animals have been proven to make people feel better whenever they are in a state of depression or sadness.

I like that this film confirms how dogs really can help humans deal with about life and its challenges, day by day. I identify with this film because I believe I have ADD and, whenever I come home, my dog makes me feel better and helps me focus with my homework. The camera work is okay, nothing terrific, but it works for this documentary. There are a variety of locations, mostly at the teenagers' houses, room or their neighborhood streets. It shows how service dogs and animal support dogs are helping people cope with mental illness and other issues. My favorite part was watching the bond between the dogs and their teenage owners.

The message is that dogs are not only human's best friend, but human's best natural medication too.

I give They're the Reason 5 out of 5 stars and recommended it for ages 5 to 18, plus adults. By Ethan P., KIDS FIRST!
KIDS FIRST!® Kid Jurors say - As a dog owner, I like the student documentary film, They're the Reason, a lot! I relate with some of the stories because COVID forced me to attend sixth grade at home. When I feel sad that I am missing out on new experiences, my dog Khaleesi is always there for me. She knows when I am sad and cuddles with me whenever I need it.

This short film talks about how dogs can truly help with people's mental health. It shows four different teenagers with different health issues like ADHD, depression, dyspepsia or anxiety, and how their dogs help them cope. Animals have been proven to make people feel better whenever they are in a state of depression or sadness.

I like that this film confirms how dogs really can help humans deal with about life and its challenges, day by day. I identify with this film because I believe I have ADD and, whenever I come home, my dog makes me feel better and helps me focus with my homework. The camera work is okay, nothing terrific, but it works for this documentary. There are a variety of locations, mostly at the teenagers' houses, room or their neighborhood streets. It shows how service dogs and animal support dogs are helping people cope with mental illness and other issues. My favorite part was watching the bond between the dogs and their teenage owners.

The message is that dogs are not only human's best friend, but human's best natural medication too.

I give They're the Reason 5 out of 5 stars and recommended it for ages 5 to 18, plus adults. By Ethan P., KIDS FIRST!
Runtime: 7 minutes Juror Recommended Age: 5-18 Suggested Retail Price: $ Media: VIDEO



This title is in the KIDS FIRST! Film Festival - it may not be a regular, endorsed title
I AM ODD - MIKE CONNARIS
Series: STUDENT SHORT, AGES 8-18
Description - Benjamin Giroux, a 10 year old autistic boy from New York, wrote a poem called "I Am Odd" for a school project. The poem went viral and It inspired this song using Ben's lyrics. A talented young 2D animator, Rory Russell, was approached to tell Ben's story in a simple animated music video to help raise autistic awareness.
KIDS FIRST!® Adult Jurors say - I love this film! Watching this completely made my day! It is so positive and uplifting.

This student animated short is fantastic. The topic, inspired by a poem that went viral was written by a 10-year-old autistic boy, and is inspiring! The music that accompanies it is upbeat and celebratory.

The animation starts out as illustrated black and white line drawings. As the boy is accepted more, he takes on color, as do his colleagues. Although the animation is not full range, with mostly still images of people whose mouths are the only moving parts, it doesn't seem to matter. It is so full of life!

The message this film portrays is how autistic people are an important part of our universe. Celebrate them.

I give I Am Odd 5 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 8 to 18, plus adults. Reviewed by Julie S., KIDS FIRST!
KIDS FIRST!® Kid Jurors say - I love this film! Watching this completely made my day! It is so positive and uplifting.

This student animated short is fantastic. The topic, inspired by a poem that went viral was written by a 10-year-old autistic boy, and is inspiring! The music that accompanies it is upbeat and celebratory.

The animation starts out as illustrated black and white line drawings. As the boy is accepted more, he takes on color, as do his colleagues. Although the animation is not full range, with mostly still images of people whose mouths are the only moving parts, it doesn't seem to matter. It is so full of life!

The message this film portrays is how autistic people are an important part of our universe. Celebrate them.

I give I Am Odd 5 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 8 to 18, plus adults. Reviewed by Julie S., KIDS FIRST!
Runtime: 4 minutes Juror Recommended Age: 8-18 Suggested Retail Price: $ Media: VIDEO



This title is in the KIDS FIRST! Film Festival - it may not be a regular, endorsed title
HALLOWEEN SLEEPOVER, A - THERESA PICKETT
Series: STUDENT SHORT, AGES 5-12
Description - Samantha Pickett is a writer, director, and songwriter/singer. Her original songs have won Best Musical Two friends go trick-or-treating, and they are in for a fright!
KIDS FIRST!® Adult Jurors say - A Halloween Sleepover is the perfect sort to show in schools about trick or treating safety tips. Even though the clip is super short, it still teaches you to not go trick or treating by yourself or without adult supervision. I like how dolls are used in this project. I like the originality of this short film.

This film is about two friends sleeping over on Halloween night. One of the girls (a doll) is dressed in a costume and she gets the idea of going trick or treating by themselves and without supervision of an adult. They go to the first house and get candy, but when they go to the second house they get scared by the owner. The lady tells them that the mom who is hosting the sleepover told her to scare the girls, because they went out without permission. The mom wanted to teach them a lesson.

I like the message to younger kids. This short film is made by a 6th grader and they did great for such a short film and for little resources. I thought eh use of dolls is very original and unique, in this case The American Dolls brand.

The message is to not go trick or treating on your own. Always be accompanied by an adult.

I give A Halloween Sleepover 3.5 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 5 to 12. This short film emphasizes safety on Halloween night. That is something every family should discuss with their children. By Ethan P., KIDS FIRST!
KIDS FIRST!® Kid Jurors say - A Halloween Sleepover is the perfect sort to show in schools about trick or treating safety tips. Even though the clip is super short, it still teaches you to not go trick or treating by yourself or without adult supervision. I like how dolls are used in this project. I like the originality of this short film.

This film is about two friends sleeping over on Halloween night. One of the girls (a doll) is dressed in a costume and she gets the idea of going trick or treating by themselves and without supervision of an adult. They go to the first house and get candy, but when they go to the second house they get scared by the owner. The lady tells them that the mom who is hosting the sleepover told her to scare the girls, because they went out without permission. The mom wanted to teach them a lesson.

I like the message to younger kids. This short film is made by a 6th grader and they did great for such a short film and for little resources. I thought eh use of dolls is very original and unique, in this case The American Dolls brand.

The message is to not go trick or treating on your own. Always be accompanied by an adult.

I give A Halloween Sleepover 3.5 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 5 to 12. This short film emphasizes safety on Halloween night. That is something every family should discuss with their children. By Ethan P., KIDS FIRST!
Runtime: 1 minutes Juror Recommended Age: 5-12 Suggested Retail Price: $ Media: VIDEO



This title is in the KIDS FIRST! Film Festival - it may not be a regular, endorsed title
NEST, THE - THOMAS RAJAN
Series: INDIE SHORT, AGES 3-6
Description - Seven-year-old Esther got the company of a mother bird during her summer vacation. The film portrait the an unknown relationship between the bird and Esther which leads to some memorable events and finally end up with a very positive message.
KIDS FIRST!® Adult Jurors say - Quite charming. I love how respectful the young girl is of the bird and the eggs.

The storyline follows a 7-year-old girl who aids a mother bird by rescuing her fallen nest and adds a discovered egg from the park to it, which mama bird readily adopts.

This silent short film expresses the respect that a young girl has for nature, from its opening scene. She offers her aid quite carefully, referring to books for guidance so she does the right thing. The camerawork is well executed, as is the audio. At times, the lighting is poor but it doesn't detract from the overall impact of the film. When the girl finds a fallen nest, she replaces it to its spot high above her front door. When she finds an egg at the park, she carefully puts it into her pocket and takes it home to place in the nest with the mother bird's other eggs. Her sweet attitude prevails throughout the film which is enhanced by background music that builds in its crescendo as the plot develops. At times it may seem a bit overly dramatic, but then again, life emerging before our very eyes is indeed dramatic.

The message of this film is about respecting nature and aiding it only on an "as needed" basis.

I give The Nest 4 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 3 to 6. By Julie S., KIDS FIRST!
KIDS FIRST!® Kid Jurors say - Quite charming. I love how respectful the young girl is of the bird and the eggs.

The storyline follows a 7-year-old girl who aids a mother bird by rescuing her fallen nest and adds a discovered egg from the park to it, which mama bird readily adopts.

This silent short film expresses the respect that a young girl has for nature, from its opening scene. She offers her aid quite carefully, referring to books for guidance so she does the right thing. The camerawork is well executed, as is the audio. At times, the lighting is poor but it doesn't detract from the overall impact of the film. When the girl finds a fallen nest, she replaces it to its spot high above her front door. When she finds an egg at the park, she carefully puts it into her pocket and takes it home to place in the nest with the mother bird's other eggs. Her sweet attitude prevails throughout the film which is enhanced by background music that builds in its crescendo as the plot develops. At times it may seem a bit overly dramatic, but then again, life emerging before our very eyes is indeed dramatic.

The message of this film is about respecting nature and aiding it only on an "as needed" basis.

I give The Nest 4 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 3 to 6. By Julie S., KIDS FIRST!
Runtime: 10 minutes Juror Recommended Age: 3-6 Suggested Retail Price: $ Media: VIDEO



This title is in the KIDS FIRST! Film Festival - it may not be a regular, endorsed title
MADAPPALLY UNITED - AJAY GOVIND
Series: FOREIGN FEATURE, AGES 10-18
Description - As part of an event in their government school students are awarded sports kits. Little do they know that the chief guest at the ceremony, is falsely embroiled in a fraud land deal case that risks not only his reputation, but also his and his family's safety. The film follows one group of children as they head to play with their new cricket kit. Oblivious of the ominous occurrences around them, they learn that empathy, leadership, and sportsmanship are more important than bat-and-ball games. And that adults would gain much more if they would practice the values that they preach to children.
KIDS FIRST!® Adult Jurors say - The rich cultural threads woven together by director and writer Ajay Covind held my interest for the entire film. Together with a talented cast and crew, Covind captures the developing camaraderie of Indian children who are forming a cricket team. This film is precious, despite its slow pace and chaotic style, plus the story comes together at the end with totally feel good moments.

The film begins at a caf� with a clever owner rattling off statistics in an impromptu way. We learn that this is his schtick and a part of the story building in Madappally, a small rural Indian town. The local school has acquired cricket equipment and it is to be shared among the students. Each group forms a team and the premise is about how each kid and family calibrates the extent to which this matters. The values of the parents, the business community and the students themselves are similar to what we experience in the U.S. in some ways, and completely different in other ways.

There is much more going on in Madappally United than just a game. There are back room politics, putting commerce ahead of education, and fair play. There are unsympathetic fathers that restrict their children or scold their wives in fits of jealousy, wishing they were still kids with playtime. There are girls that are going to play with the boys and their families' reactions to "girl power." There is a sudden loss of life by a heartbroken businessman, at the same moment that he is cheated out of creating a community center for the children. In other words, as the log line states, the journey itself is the story.

The costumes are typical, Indian, every day wear, with girls in skirts, women in saris and burley men in cotton linen shirts. The settings range from upper class to poorer dwellings and the school sets the stage for competition and camaraderie to bloom. The music is magical. Anand Madhusoodanan underscores using strings, flute, percussion vocals and guitar. The feeling is Indian, but very modern. Cinematographer Tanweer Ahmed creates an invisible seam of daily life by including all eleven kids in many scenes, with parents added in their very long pre-game stroll to the playing field. I enjoyed how Ahmed creates compelling scenes such as one of the girls blowing soap bubbles while washing laundry. "It takes a village to make a film" is part of the ending title and I would add the Sisyphus Rocks Film team proves this point.

The message of this film is that change is inevitable, and the journey is the story of our lives.

I give Madappally United 5 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 10 to 18, plus adults. Reviewed by Nancy K., KIDS FIRST!
KIDS FIRST!® Kid Jurors say - The rich cultural threads woven together by director and writer Ajay Covind held my interest for the entire film. Together with a talented cast and crew, Covind captures the developing camaraderie of Indian children who are forming a cricket team. This film is precious, despite its slow pace and chaotic style, plus the story comes together at the end with totally feel good moments.

The film begins at a caf� with a clever owner rattling off statistics in an impromptu way. We learn that this is his schtick and a part of the story building in Madappally, a small rural Indian town. The local school has acquired cricket equipment and it is to be shared among the students. Each group forms a team and the premise is about how each kid and family calibrates the extent to which this matters. The values of the parents, the business community and the students themselves are similar to what we experience in the U.S. in some ways, and completely different in other ways.

There is much more going on in Madappally United than just a game. There are back room politics, putting commerce ahead of education, and fair play. There are unsympathetic fathers that restrict their children or scold their wives in fits of jealousy, wishing they were still kids with playtime. There are girls that are going to play with the boys and their families' reactions to "girl power." There is a sudden loss of life by a heartbroken businessman, at the same moment that he is cheated out of creating a community center for the children. In other words, as the log line states, the journey itself is the story.

The costumes are typical, Indian, every day wear, with girls in skirts, women in saris and burley men in cotton linen shirts. The settings range from upper class to poorer dwellings and the school sets the stage for competition and camaraderie to bloom. The music is magical. Anand Madhusoodanan underscores using strings, flute, percussion vocals and guitar. The feeling is Indian, but very modern. Cinematographer Tanweer Ahmed creates an invisible seam of daily life by including all eleven kids in many scenes, with parents added in their very long pre-game stroll to the playing field. I enjoyed how Ahmed creates compelling scenes such as one of the girls blowing soap bubbles while washing laundry. "It takes a village to make a film" is part of the ending title and I would add the Sisyphus Rocks Film team proves this point.

The message of this film is that change is inevitable, and the journey is the story of our lives.

I give Madappally United 5 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 10 to 18, plus adults. Reviewed by Nancy K., KIDS FIRST!
Runtime: 87 minutes Juror Recommended Age: 10-18 Suggested Retail Price: $ Media: VIDEO



This title is in the KIDS FIRST! Film Festival - it may not be a regular, endorsed title
JUMP - STANLEY HECTOR
Series: FOREIGN SHORT, AGES 3-7
Description - Jump! is a tale of overcoming deep fears and conveying that on the other side of any challenge is an experience that will strengthen your character and stay with you for a lifetime. I remember being in a scout group during my early childhood days. It used to be Saturdays when I used to get most excited about wearing a scout uniform to the school. The beret cap along with a rope bundle on the waist and a whistle on the shirt's pocket not only motivated us to step out of our comfort zones, but also made us feel a sense of responsibility, of being just and lending out a helping hand whenever possible no matter the risk involved.
KIDS FIRST!® Adult Jurors say - Jump is a very different film. It is also very brief. There is no dialogue, but it's clear what's going on.

The storyline follows an Indian boy whose kite ends up in a tree. When he tries to rescue it, his problems multiply quickly, and he runs into a few problems while trying to do so.

The storyline is cute and clever. The camerawork is well executed, nothing fancy, but clear and easy to follow. I like how it captures the boy in the forest by showing different shots of the boy in the tree from various angles. The little boy's outfit looks like a school uniform or a Boy Scout uniform. One thing that I like about how he problem-solves is how and collected he is. The background music is sort of uninspiring; it's a track of simple, repetitive sounds that work, but is sometimes annoying. The birds chirping and the different natural sounds in the woods with things falling from the trees was pretty cool and spot on. There is only one character and he drives the show. We think he's really up a creek when the ladder falls, but he proves that he can come up with a Plan B. My favorite part is the ending, but you'll have to watch it to see that.

The message is that you sometimes have to face your fears to keep on going. It does show a kid doing something risky that kids might imitate when we see the boy climbing a tree without anyone else around. The ending also is a bit risky.

I give Jump 3.5 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 3 to 7. By SaniyaRain F. and Julie S., KIDS FIRST!
KIDS FIRST!® Kid Jurors say - Jump is a very different film. It is also very brief. There is no dialogue, but it's clear what's going on.

The storyline follows an Indian boy whose kite ends up in a tree. When he tries to rescue it, his problems multiply quickly, and he runs into a few problems while trying to do so.

The storyline is cute and clever. The camerawork is well executed, nothing fancy, but clear and easy to follow. I like how it captures the boy in the forest by showing different shots of the boy in the tree from various angles. The little boy's outfit looks like a school uniform or a Boy Scout uniform. One thing that I like about how he problem-solves is how and collected he is. The background music is sort of uninspiring; it's a track of simple, repetitive sounds that work, but is sometimes annoying. The birds chirping and the different natural sounds in the woods with things falling from the trees was pretty cool and spot on. There is only one character and he drives the show. We think he's really up a creek when the ladder falls, but he proves that he can come up with a Plan B. My favorite part is the ending, but you'll have to watch it to see that.

The message is that you sometimes have to face your fears to keep on going. It does show a kid doing something risky that kids might imitate when we see the boy climbing a tree without anyone else around. The ending also is a bit risky.

I give Jump 3.5 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 3 to 7. By SaniyaRain F. and Julie S., KIDS FIRST!
Runtime: 6 minutes Juror Recommended Age: 3-7 Suggested Retail Price: $ Media: VIDEO



This title is in the KIDS FIRST! Film Festival - it may not be a regular, endorsed title
CRACKED - MAHMUT TAS
Series: FOREIGN SHORT, AGES 5-18
Description - A little girl lives in a village with her mother where water sources are dwindling by day. Drought effects her imagination, even her doodles and drawings. Not only people but the nature struggles with the unrelenting aridness. This little girl though, never loses hope. She tries to do as best she can, sacrificing from herself for her beloved nature.
KIDS FIRST!® Adult Jurors say - What is it about a movie from a very different culture, such as Cracked, from Turkey, that makes me feel connected to all human beings? Watching this little girl and her mother in a village where water sources are dwindling makes me feel care and connection for them and their community. I love this film.

This short film unwinds in a foreign land where drought has cracked the earth like no other place I've ever seen. The set is amazing, with a small home in an arid mountain landscape. The story is told through repetitive action rather than language; and the soundscape of this vignette is of water being poured, dogs barking, birds singing and cattle braying. Otherwise there is only one piece of music, a classical piano, which takes us to the closing of the film with heart and heroism.

The pace of Cracked is slow but, like a glass of water being poured, is sentient. Each scene is artistically choreographed to shed just a little light on the plight of people who are suffering due to climate change. The lack of narrative and interactivity between the mother and child gave me pause to wonder, why? As a dramatic short, the silences help build the meaningful story of what lays quietly within the heart of this little girl. My favorite part is when the girl runs across the parched land carrying a small vessel of water to water a plant that is flowering there, and the background music begins, the camera pulls away from her drawing to show us that she has drawn the same scene. Wonderful and hopeful.

The lesson of this film is to be grateful for nature's beauty, even when it appears to exist only in small crevices of life. "If you give love, you will receive love, that's what makes this whole world go round." - BJ Thomas

I give Cracked 5 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 5 to 18, plus adults. By Nancy K. KIDS FIRST!
KIDS FIRST!® Kid Jurors say - What is it about a movie from a very different culture, such as Cracked, from Turkey, that makes me feel connected to all human beings? Watching this little girl and her mother in a village where water sources are dwindling makes me feel care and connection for them and their community. I love this film.

This short film unwinds in a foreign land where drought has cracked the earth like no other place I've ever seen. The set is amazing, with a small home in an arid mountain landscape. The story is told through repetitive action rather than language; and the soundscape of this vignette is of water being poured, dogs barking, birds singing and cattle braying. Otherwise there is only one piece of music, a classical piano, which takes us to the closing of the film with heart and heroism.

The pace of Cracked is slow but, like a glass of water being poured, is sentient. Each scene is artistically choreographed to shed just a little light on the plight of people who are suffering due to climate change. The lack of narrative and interactivity between the mother and child gave me pause to wonder, why? As a dramatic short, the silences help build the meaningful story of what lays quietly within the heart of this little girl. My favorite part is when the girl runs across the parched land carrying a small vessel of water to water a plant that is flowering there, and the background music begins, the camera pulls away from her drawing to show us that she has drawn the same scene. Wonderful and hopeful.

The lesson of this film is to be grateful for nature's beauty, even when it appears to exist only in small crevices of life. "If you give love, you will receive love, that's what makes this whole world go round." - BJ Thomas

I give Cracked 5 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 5 to 18, plus adults. By Nancy K. KIDS FIRST!
Runtime: 5 minutes Juror Recommended Age: 5-18 Suggested Retail Price: $ Media: VIDEO



This title is in the KIDS FIRST! Film Festival - it may not be a regular, endorsed title
YELLOW DRESS, THE - PROMOFEST
Series: FOREIGN SHORT, AGES 12-18
Description - To help her mother regain her joie de vivre after breast cancer and to cushion the blow of her father's news, Aisling, 14, sets her up on what she hopes will be the perfect date but when the date shows up with his teenage son in tow, things take an unexpected turn.
KIDS FIRST!® Adult Jurors say - This dramatic short is an amazing snippet of the importance that young people play in the healing, growth of their parents. The Yellow Dress puts a lighter step in my gait, and director/ writer Deborah Grimes deserves thanks for this. I love more than just the Irish accents of these English-speaking actors of the two leads. Tara Breathnach and Leia Murphy play mother and daughter, using a full range of emotion and bring this story to life.

The Yellow Dress in an Irish film about a 14-year-old girl who tries to get her mother moving on the dating scene, by setting her up on a date. The mother has recently divorced, while having a nerve-wracking brush with disease. Leia Murphy who plays Aisley, the daughter, is a force of nature, giving her mother heartfelt, if not demanding reasons to "polish up" and get out of the house to meet others. The story unfolds from difficulty and concern, and takes a few quick turns to becoming a positive story, making me feel the way all of us feel when love conquers our fear and sadness. There is a wonderful comedic date scene leaving mom and daughter to look back and forth at each other, rolling their eyes, and unleashes the climax of the film.

The great technical quality of the film uses what I call tricky "smoke and mirror shots" by the cinematographer. Robin Whenary gives us a visually pleasing experience, while I root to see if Aisley will win the battle of bolstering her mom's self-consciousness. The close-ups, the scenes when the gals have broken free and are running on the dock, are steady and powerful. In fact, most scenes are endearing, because the actresses really play their parts well and the camerawork and direction are spot on. While the sets are ordinary; they are totally appropriate for the film. They replicate a middle class home with items that could be from anywhere. And this story could be anybody's story. The subtlety of the script, while dodging the topic of breast cancer, is intriguing as the plot avoids certain specifics just enough to keep the viewer anticipating that special moment when, and if, mother and daughter will ever be on the same page again. The music is primarily orchestrated by piano. It is underscored with great subtlety by the composer. I had to listen this twice which, in fact, is a good sign for most film music. Music in films is there to heighten the emotions, rather than blast out of the screen narrative. Well done.

The message of this film is to stay on your "game" regardless of how tough life gets. Jump back into activities, because children and family members need to see that you can. People are resilient and sometimes they need a little help to get them to see that they can accomplish more than they think.

I rate The Yellow Dress 5 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 12 to 18, plus adults. By Nancy K., KIDS FIRST!
KIDS FIRST!® Kid Jurors say - This dramatic short is an amazing snippet of the importance that young people play in the healing, growth of their parents. The Yellow Dress puts a lighter step in my gait, and director/ writer Deborah Grimes deserves thanks for this. I love more than just the Irish accents of these English-speaking actors of the two leads. Tara Breathnach and Leia Murphy play mother and daughter, using a full range of emotion and bring this story to life.

The Yellow Dress in an Irish film about a 14-year-old girl who tries to get her mother moving on the dating scene, by setting her up on a date. The mother has recently divorced, while having a nerve-wracking brush with disease. Leia Murphy who plays Aisley, the daughter, is a force of nature, giving her mother heartfelt, if not demanding reasons to "polish up" and get out of the house to meet others. The story unfolds from difficulty and concern, and takes a few quick turns to becoming a positive story, making me feel the way all of us feel when love conquers our fear and sadness. There is a wonderful comedic date scene leaving mom and daughter to look back and forth at each other, rolling their eyes, and unleashes the climax of the film.

The great technical quality of the film uses what I call tricky "smoke and mirror shots" by the cinematographer. Robin Whenary gives us a visually pleasing experience, while I root to see if Aisley will win the battle of bolstering her mom's self-consciousness. The close-ups, the scenes when the gals have broken free and are running on the dock, are steady and powerful. In fact, most scenes are endearing, because the actresses really play their parts well and the camerawork and direction are spot on. While the sets are ordinary; they are totally appropriate for the film. They replicate a middle class home with items that could be from anywhere. And this story could be anybody's story. The subtlety of the script, while dodging the topic of breast cancer, is intriguing as the plot avoids certain specifics just enough to keep the viewer anticipating that special moment when, and if, mother and daughter will ever be on the same page again. The music is primarily orchestrated by piano. It is underscored with great subtlety by the composer. I had to listen this twice which, in fact, is a good sign for most film music. Music in films is there to heighten the emotions, rather than blast out of the screen narrative. Well done.

The message of this film is to stay on your "game" regardless of how tough life gets. Jump back into activities, because children and family members need to see that you can. People are resilient and sometimes they need a little help to get them to see that they can accomplish more than they think.

I rate The Yellow Dress 5 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 12 to 18, plus adults. By Nancy K., KIDS FIRST!
Runtime: 14 minutes Juror Recommended Age: 12-18 Suggested Retail Price: $ Media: VIDEO



This title is in the KIDS FIRST! Film Festival - it may not be a regular, endorsed title
MY JOURNEY ACROSS THE OCEAN - MADELEINE TOOMEY
Series: STUDENT SHORT, AGES 8-18
Description - A short animated film about crossing the Atlantic Ocean in a small sailboat and discovering that even where humans have not yet explored, trash usually finds a way of getting there first--even in the middle of the ocean.
KIDS FIRST!® Adult Jurors say - My Journey Across the Ocean is a PSA for children about protecting the ocean. The animation is simple; the narrator is a young girl who is passionate about the topic.

When Madeleine Kelly Toomey was 13, she traveled for a year with her family on a small boat. While on her journey, she discovered just how much trash there is in in the ocean. Madeline describes how she helped pick up some of the trash and encourages audiences to do the same.

The story is poignant and brings to the forefront the fact that, even in the middle of the ocean, there is a vast amount of trash. Madeleine was shocked to discover trash in every corner of the world and her message to the viewer is to mindful of your waste, change a few habits and YOU can be the change our oceans need.

The animation is simple and well executed. The locations are well illustrated. The message is very clear and frightening. The background music is light and easy, nothing remarkable, but it works. The key character is Madeleine, the narrator, who grows from not being all that interested in living on a boat to working to save the ocean from trash and caring about our planet. Madeleine is the producer, director, and the narrator; the story is based on her personal experience. Her contribution in this area is outstanding. My favorite part is the ending - the fish floating around in trash and Madeleine narrating gives the viewer a wakeup call and wanting to do their part to help.

The message is to pick up after yourselves, be mindful of your waste, change a few habit and save the ocean and its wildlife.

I give My Journey Across the Ocean 4.5 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 5 to 16, plus adults. This would play well in any festival focused on oceans, ecology, and protecting the Earth and wildlife. Reviewed by Heather S. and Julie S., KIDS FIRST!
KIDS FIRST!® Kid Jurors say - My Journey Across the Ocean is a PSA for children about protecting the ocean. The animation is simple; the narrator is a young girl who is passionate about the topic.

When Madeleine Kelly Toomey was 13, she traveled for a year with her family on a small boat. While on her journey, she discovered just how much trash there is in in the ocean. Madeline describes how she helped pick up some of the trash and encourages audiences to do the same.

The story is poignant and brings to the forefront the fact that, even in the middle of the ocean, there is a vast amount of trash. Madeleine was shocked to discover trash in every corner of the world and her message to the viewer is to mindful of your waste, change a few habits and YOU can be the change our oceans need.

The animation is simple and well executed. The locations are well illustrated. The message is very clear and frightening. The background music is light and easy, nothing remarkable, but it works. The key character is Madeleine, the narrator, who grows from not being all that interested in living on a boat to working to save the ocean from trash and caring about our planet. Madeleine is the producer, director, and the narrator; the story is based on her personal experience. Her contribution in this area is outstanding. My favorite part is the ending - the fish floating around in trash and Madeleine narrating gives the viewer a wakeup call and wanting to do their part to help.

The message is to pick up after yourselves, be mindful of your waste, change a few habit and save the ocean and its wildlife.

I give My Journey Across the Ocean 4.5 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 5 to 16, plus adults. This would play well in any festival focused on oceans, ecology, and protecting the Earth and wildlife. Reviewed by Heather S. and Julie S., KIDS FIRST!
Runtime: 4 minutes Juror Recommended Age: 8-18 Suggested Retail Price: $ Media: VIDEO



This title is in the KIDS FIRST! Film Festival - it may not be a regular, endorsed title
DEAR MRS. PRESIDENT - ANA MARIA MEDICI
Series: INDIE SHORT, AGES 5-12
Description - Maria Rivera is a little girl, with BIG dreams. With a handwritten letter, she expresses all the hope and inspiration she feels for her hero, the first female President of The United States. Representation within The White House teaches Maria, that she too, can be anything she dreams of. Dear Mrs. President reminds kids to carve out their own destiny, and boldly pursue their life's ambitions and dreams.
KIDS FIRST!® Adult Jurors say - I love this short animated film and its pro girl message.

This 3D animation shows a young girl of color, Maria Rivera, who writes a letter to the president , Mrs. President, who is the first woman president and thanks her for her position in making things more fair. She says how inspired she is, seeing this woman as a mom and wife, helping our country and the world.

The animation is well executed; the message is spot on and definitely a wonderful message to young girls today. My only complaint is that I wish it was longer. I love seeing how inspired the young girl is and I love the ending.

The message of this film is to celebrate the idea of a woman President of the USA.

I give this short film 4.5 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 5 to 12, plus adults. Reviewed by Julie S., KIDS FIRST!
KIDS FIRST!® Kid Jurors say - I love this short animated film and its pro girl message.

This 3D animation shows a young girl of color, Maria Rivera, who writes a letter to the president , Mrs. President, who is the first woman president and thanks her for her position in making things more fair. She says how inspired she is, seeing this woman as a mom and wife, helping our country and the world.

The animation is well executed; the message is spot on and definitely a wonderful message to young girls today. My only complaint is that I wish it was longer. I love seeing how inspired the young girl is and I love the ending.

The message of this film is to celebrate the idea of a woman President of the USA.

I give this short film 4.5 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 5 to 12, plus adults. Reviewed by Julie S., KIDS FIRST!
Runtime: 3 minutes Juror Recommended Age: 5-12 Suggested Retail Price: $ Media: VIDEO



This title is in the KIDS FIRST! Film Festival - it may not be a regular, endorsed title
POTENDOGS - DAHL LEE
Series: FOREIGN ANIMATED SHORT, AGES 8-12
Description - In this world, there are dogs of superpowers. They are called 'PotenDogs'. PotenDogs are divided into two groups: 'Podongnet' that dreams peaceful coexistence with humans, and 'Goldfangs' that holds grudge against all mankind and try to rule them because of their memories of being hurt and mistreated by humans. One day, 'Kai', a member of 'Podongnet', and 'Wonseok', a boy who wants a dog of his own find each other by chance and decide to work as partners. Kai considers humans weak and untrustworthy, yet has no choice but to ask Wonseok to pretend to be his human companion while performing his mission.
KIDS FIRST!® Adult Jurors say - This is an outstanding pilot of PotenDogs! I love how the young boy, Wonseok's, love of dogs gets him a companion dog to infiltrate the bad dogs. I can see why dogs would want to rebel against their owners from the way some of them are treated. Dogs, in real life, may not think or act like humans, but they definitely understand what is going on around them.

Wonseok's (singer-actor, Jun Suk Kyong Sook Kyeong Jeon) love of dogs allows him to communicate with one of the PotenDogs, who give him the chance to become his companion so that he can infiltrate the GoldFangs that are biting ordinary dogs.

The story addresses togetherness and bonding with Wonseok and Kai. Wonseok goes from being a lonely kid, looking at dogs at pet stores, wishing for one of his own, to talking to a brown dog, Kai, (Choi Seok Pil) who he later finds out is a PotenDog (dogs with superpowers that need a companion to infiltrate the bad dogs). I love the animation; it's simple, easy, fluid and very realistic. I like how each animal represents each member of the dog pound family. The visual effects are effective and believable, especially when Kai communicates with the other PotenDogs. I love the songs; they are very cool! My favorite is the song sung by the dog catchers, but all the song and dance numbers are catchy, especially those with the dog pound family. I like the costumes worn by the dog pound family; their outfits represent the different animals they represent. I also like the characters' various hair colors, which totally works with this story. Kai knows Wonseok has an innate love of dogs from the look of his room, which is overflowing with dog-related items and books. I also love Wonseok's daydreams of wanting a pet dog. There is some well-known talent in this show: South Korean actor-singer Jun Suk Kyong who plays Wonseok; Choi Seok Pil (Kai).

The message of this film is that dogs ought to be respected or there will be consequences (not take over the world consequences). Be aware that it does show kids doing risky things that kids might imitate such as when Wonseok falls out of a window. Also there is some pet abused such as when one of the dog owners kicks his dog at the show and another one makes fun of the dog.

I give PotenDogs 5 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 8 to 12, plus adults. The dialogue is in Korean with English subtitles, so kids need to be able to read to enjoy it.

Reviewed by Connie C., KIDS FIRST!
KIDS FIRST!® Kid Jurors say - This is an outstanding pilot of PotenDogs! I love how the young boy, Wonseok's, love of dogs gets him a companion dog to infiltrate the bad dogs. I can see why dogs would want to rebel against their owners from the way some of them are treated. Dogs, in real life, may not think or act like humans, but they definitely understand what is going on around them.

Wonseok's (singer-actor, Jun Suk Kyong Sook Kyeong Jeon) love of dogs allows him to communicate with one of the PotenDogs, who give him the chance to become his companion so that he can infiltrate the GoldFangs that are biting ordinary dogs.

The story addresses togetherness and bonding with Wonseok and Kai. Wonseok goes from being a lonely kid, looking at dogs at pet stores, wishing for one of his own, to talking to a brown dog, Kai, (Choi Seok Pil) who he later finds out is a PotenDog (dogs with superpowers that need a companion to infiltrate the bad dogs). I love the animation; it's simple, easy, fluid and very realistic. I like how each animal represents each member of the dog pound family. The visual effects are effective and believable, especially when Kai communicates with the other PotenDogs. I love the songs; they are very cool! My favorite is the song sung by the dog catchers, but all the song and dance numbers are catchy, especially those with the dog pound family. I like the costumes worn by the dog pound family; their outfits represent the different animals they represent. I also like the characters' various hair colors, which totally works with this story. Kai knows Wonseok has an innate love of dogs from the look of his room, which is overflowing with dog-related items and books. I also love Wonseok's daydreams of wanting a pet dog. There is some well-known talent in this show: South Korean actor-singer Jun Suk Kyong who plays Wonseok; Choi Seok Pil (Kai).

The message of this film is that dogs ought to be respected or there will be consequences (not take over the world consequences). Be aware that it does show kids doing risky things that kids might imitate such as when Wonseok falls out of a window. Also there is some pet abused such as when one of the dog owners kicks his dog at the show and another one makes fun of the dog.

I give PotenDogs 5 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 8 to 12, plus adults. The dialogue is in Korean with English subtitles, so kids need to be able to read to enjoy it.

Reviewed by Connie C., KIDS FIRST!
Runtime: 22 minutes Juror Recommended Age: 8-12 Suggested Retail Price: $ Media: VIDEO



This title is in the KIDS FIRST! Film Festival - it may not be a regular, endorsed title
CLARITA'S UNIVERSE - TOMAS LIPGOT
Series: FOREIGN SHORT, AGES 9-18
Description - Clarita is twelve years old and lives in Rosario, Province of Santa Fe, with her parents and sisters. Her greatest interest in the whole world is Astronomy -a passion she discovered thanks to Proyecto Miradas, an experimental and playful workshop for children, led by Sof�a and Yayo. What are meteorites made of? How were stars created? Where did the first bird come from? This girl's curiosity takes her far, to a learning trip to different astronomic sites across Argentina. We get answers from experts and scientists, but also from the knowledge of Native Peoples and from secrets hidden in Nature. Clarita's drive to learn and to explore makes us wonder at the infinite Universe of which we are all part.
KIDS FIRST!® Adult Jurors say - Clarita's Universe is an Argentinean documentary that feels more like a narrative film, because it is so well paced with twists and turns that one does not expect in a film about a young girl's interest in astronomy. If you love learning about science, space and astronomy as much as I do, this film is for you.

The storyline follows Clarita who lives in Argentina with her sisters and parents. When she meets two educators in an astronomy course, Sofia and Yayo, her life is forever changed. Her new mentors take Clarita on a trip to see a variety of observatories and planetariums where some of the most experienced astronomers in the world talk to them. She meets an astronomer who discovered a Super Nova; learns how sailors sailed using only the moon, Polaris and constellations. Through Clarita's eyes viewers have the opportunity to learn so much about the universe. She is 12 years old. She struggles to understand how religion and science intersect. Her mother is Catholic and, with loving humor, they play the "which came first, God or the big Bang" game. Clarita's mother plays a supportive role in her daughter's success by reflecting Clarita's interests back to her, reinforcing dialogue, listening to her stories and loving her like a rock star. In fact, the wonderful photographs that Clarita's parents took as she was growing up reveal her life-long fascination with the sky and its stars. The film covers her life span. The depth of the science writing left me wanting to learn more. The music styles vary and are uplifting. There are really no low points in the film; it focuses on the evolving maturity of a young girl, in braces, becoming an educated, sophisticated young woman. The dialogue is in Spanish with English subtitles. For budding scientists, it is fun to imagine being a part of the discoveries that Clarita imagines.

The message of Clarita's Universe is follow your dreams! Take risks and find opportunities outside your comfort zone to support your interests.

I give Clarita's Universe 5 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 9 to 16, plus adults. Reviewed by Nancy K., KIDS FIRST!
KIDS FIRST!® Kid Jurors say - Clarita's Universe is an Argentinean documentary that feels more like a narrative film, because it is so well paced with twists and turns that one does not expect in a film about a young girl's interest in astronomy. If you love learning about science, space and astronomy as much as I do, this film is for you.

The storyline follows Clarita who lives in Argentina with her sisters and parents. When she meets two educators in an astronomy course, Sofia and Yayo, her life is forever changed. Her new mentors take Clarita on a trip to see a variety of observatories and planetariums where some of the most experienced astronomers in the world talk to them. She meets an astronomer who discovered a Super Nova; learns how sailors sailed using only the moon, Polaris and constellations. Through Clarita's eyes viewers have the opportunity to learn so much about the universe. She is 12 years old. She struggles to understand how religion and science intersect. Her mother is Catholic and, with loving humor, they play the "which came first, God or the big Bang" game. Clarita's mother plays a supportive role in her daughter's success by reflecting Clarita's interests back to her, reinforcing dialogue, listening to her stories and loving her like a rock star. In fact, the wonderful photographs that Clarita's parents took as she was growing up reveal her life-long fascination with the sky and its stars. The film covers her life span. The depth of the science writing left me wanting to learn more. The music styles vary and are uplifting. There are really no low points in the film; it focuses on the evolving maturity of a young girl, in braces, becoming an educated, sophisticated young woman. The dialogue is in Spanish with English subtitles. For budding scientists, it is fun to imagine being a part of the discoveries that Clarita imagines.

The message of Clarita's Universe is follow your dreams! Take risks and find opportunities outside your comfort zone to support your interests.

I give Clarita's Universe 5 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 9 to 16, plus adults. Reviewed by Nancy K., KIDS FIRST!
Runtime: 73 minutes Juror Recommended Age: 9-18 Suggested Retail Price: $ Media: VIDEO



This title is in the KIDS FIRST! Film Festival - it may not be a regular, endorsed title
SECOND CHANGE, A - THE NEW COMERS
Series: DOCUMENTARY, AGES 11-18
Description - Hi, my name is Arden. I am currently a 12-year-old living in San Diego, California. Some of my goals in this documentary are to show the viewers the homeless problems in San Diego.

I live in San Diego, and I often see the homeless when I drive around downtown. During this documentary, I have incorporated interviews of people that have been homeless and people that are working to help stop the homeless issue in San Diego. This documentary explains how hard it actually is to be homeless. I hope this documentary opens your eyes to what it is like to be homeless and how homeless people can't just "get a job." Hearing all these stories has changed the way I think of homelessness, and I hope it changes the way you think too.

Anyone gave a second chance is given an opportunity; a way to move forward.
KIDS FIRST!® Adult Jurors say - A Second Chance is an amazing short by seventh grader Arden Pala about homelessness and the road back to well-being. Inspiring and eye-opening, I learned a few things about how I can make a difference, including acknowledging all human beings have innate dignity.

This narrative documentary puts a collage of interviews together of homeless people - young and old, brown, black and white - and of service organizations that assist folks such as Inter Faith Services, Lucky Duck Foundation and Balloon Guru. All pro-active people can help those who are in transition and stuck in a cycle of homelessness. The results can be so uplifting and this documentary shows the arc of the problem and solutions found by those interviewed.

Well shot, edited and narrated, A Second Chance is a feel good movie, despite the challenging topic of homelessness. I love this young writer/narrator's factual rollout, knowing that he has a heart of gold. The content is straightforward and not full of sentimentality. The background music is stock music, piano music mostly, and works fine. There's nothing striking about it, but it makes a pleasant background of sound. The idea that such a young person can assist in coordinating this profound teaching tool in the form of a short film attests to the intelligence and compassion of our younger generation. Bravo to kids out there who are "Saving the World."

The message is that everyone can make a difference. When you see a homeless person, look them in the eye and let them know that you see them. If you can recommend a program that could help them, that might also help them get a second chance.

I rate A Second Chance 4 out of 5 stars and recommend this for ages 12 to 18, plus adults. By Nancy K. and Julie S., KIDS FIRST!
KIDS FIRST!® Kid Jurors say - A Second Chance is an amazing short by seventh grader Arden Pala about homelessness and the road back to well-being. Inspiring and eye-opening, I learned a few things about how I can make a difference, including acknowledging all human beings have innate dignity.

This narrative documentary puts a collage of interviews together of homeless people - young and old, brown, black and white - and of service organizations that assist folks such as Inter Faith Services, Lucky Duck Foundation and Balloon Guru. All pro-active people can help those who are in transition and stuck in a cycle of homelessness. The results can be so uplifting and this documentary shows the arc of the problem and solutions found by those interviewed.

Well shot, edited and narrated, A Second Chance is a feel good movie, despite the challenging topic of homelessness. I love this young writer/narrator's factual rollout, knowing that he has a heart of gold. The content is straightforward and not full of sentimentality. The background music is stock music, piano music mostly, and works fine. There's nothing striking about it, but it makes a pleasant background of sound. The idea that such a young person can assist in coordinating this profound teaching tool in the form of a short film attests to the intelligence and compassion of our younger generation. Bravo to kids out there who are "Saving the World."

The message is that everyone can make a difference. When you see a homeless person, look them in the eye and let them know that you see them. If you can recommend a program that could help them, that might also help them get a second chance.

I rate A Second Chance 4 out of 5 stars and recommend this for ages 12 to 18, plus adults. By Nancy K. and Julie S., KIDS FIRST!
Runtime: 10 minutes Juror Recommended Age: 12-18 Suggested Retail Price: $ Media: VIDEO



This title is in the KIDS FIRST! Film Festival - it may not be a regular, endorsed title
MOUNTAIN BEAR - JEREMY NORTHCOTE
Series: FOREIGN SHORT, AGES 5-8
Description - Jive along with Mountain Bear as he cheers on Merry Bella in her match-up with the boys in basketball and soccer! Remember, you're the leyenda with the swagger of the mountain bear!
KIDS FIRST!® Adult Jurors say - This short music video has a terrific message but I can't say I love the voice of the singer.

The storyline follows Merry Bella in her match up with boys in basketball and soccer as she is coached by Mountain Bear. The animation is pretty well executed. I'm impressed that it uses freely available 3D animation technology, which allows a filmmaker to create something without having to purchase exorbitantly expensive software. The story is well developed and the lyrics are inspiring. I'm just not fond of the singer's voice, which seems a bit cloying to me. Still, it works for this short video.

The message is an inspiring one for young people to be their own star in the sky.

I give this film 3.5 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 5 to 8. Reviewed by Julie S., KIDS FIRST!
KIDS FIRST!® Kid Jurors say - This short music video has a terrific message but I can't say I love the voice of the singer.

The storyline follows Merry Bella in her match up with boys in basketball and soccer as she is coached by Mountain Bear. The animation is pretty well executed. I'm impressed that it uses freely available 3D animation technology, which allows a filmmaker to create something without having to purchase exorbitantly expensive software. The story is well developed and the lyrics are inspiring. I'm just not fond of the singer's voice, which seems a bit cloying to me. Still, it works for this short video.

The message is an inspiring one for young people to be their own star in the sky.

I give this film 3.5 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 5 to 8. Reviewed by Julie S., KIDS FIRST!
Runtime: 3 minutes Juror Recommended Age: 5-8 Suggested Retail Price: $ Media: VIDEO



This title is in the KIDS FIRST! Film Festival - it may not be a regular, endorsed title
FOILED - HAO-WEI TIMOTHY CHANG
Series: STUDENT SHORT, AGES 5-10
Description - Foiled is a family comedy about ten-year-old Dylan and his younger brother Cody who accidentally rip their best friend's baseball card. They must fix it otherwise they'll lose their best friend and never get to play baseball again.
KIDS FIRST!® Adult Jurors say - Foiled is a modern, relatable film with its main focus being on baseball cards. There is a clear, important theme and the plot takes twists you might not expect. If you want a contemporary short film that dives into important lessons, using a kid-friendly example, this film's for you.

Mike (Nikolai Kalajdzic) gets an ultra-rare baseball card signed by his and Dylan's (Ethan Jung) idol. With Dylan's begging, Mike reluctantly lets him borrow it for the day. When Dylan's brother, Cody (Jack Stasica) rips the card while trying to steal it from Dylan he and Dylan race against the clock to try to fix it so the rip isn't visible. After tons of plans gone wrong, the precious baseball card is in worse shape than it was before. What will the brothers do? Will Mike be forgiving or will this end much worse than it started?

The story is very well written. The main plot is strong and develops in way that isn't too predictable. I wish that some of the background characters could have had more interesting parts, as they didn't get to shine. The cinematography is well done. The sets and locations are pretty basic and suit the film. There are only a few locations, including a baseball dugout and a bedroom. The background music works very well. The characters are well developed. The actors give believable performances. The best part is the storyline and I applaud the writers for a great script. in this area.

The message in this film is that if you just tell the truth, it makes sticky situations a lot easier to deal with than if you don't.

I give Foiled 3.5 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 5 to 10, plus adults. Reviewed by Kyla C., KIDS FIRST!
KIDS FIRST!® Kid Jurors say - Foiled is a modern, relatable film with its main focus being on baseball cards. There is a clear, important theme and the plot takes twists you might not expect. If you want a contemporary short film that dives into important lessons, using a kid-friendly example, this film's for you.

Mike (Nikolai Kalajdzic) gets an ultra-rare baseball card signed by his and Dylan's (Ethan Jung) idol. With Dylan's begging, Mike reluctantly lets him borrow it for the day. When Dylan's brother, Cody (Jack Stasica) rips the card while trying to steal it from Dylan he and Dylan race against the clock to try to fix it so the rip isn't visible. After tons of plans gone wrong, the precious baseball card is in worse shape than it was before. What will the brothers do? Will Mike be forgiving or will this end much worse than it started?

The story is very well written. The main plot is strong and develops in way that isn't too predictable. I wish that some of the background characters could have had more interesting parts, as they didn't get to shine. The cinematography is well done. The sets and locations are pretty basic and suit the film. There are only a few locations, including a baseball dugout and a bedroom. The background music works very well. The characters are well developed. The actors give believable performances. The best part is the storyline and I applaud the writers for a great script. in this area.

The message in this film is that if you just tell the truth, it makes sticky situations a lot easier to deal with than if you don't.

I give Foiled 3.5 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 5 to 10, plus adults. Reviewed by Kyla C., KIDS FIRST!
Runtime: 11 minutes Juror Recommended Age: 5-10 Suggested Retail Price: $ Media: VIDEO



This title is in the KIDS FIRST! Film Festival - it may not be a regular, endorsed title
ALL IN OUR HANDS - ALAN CHRIEST / POWERSPASH PROJECT
Series: INDIE SHORT, AGES 8-18
Description - When storms arise and the ground is uncertain, let the light within you be your guide.
KIDS FIRST!® Adult Jurors say - I like All In Our Hands! It is a very mellow music video with calming visuals and a heartwarming song.

The film is a montage of lighthouses by the ocean side, on top of cliffs and isolated beaches. The lyrics describe how the whole world is in our hands.

The cinematography is wonderful. The visuals are high quality with impressive and inspiring locations. All the shots are beautiful. The music and the visuals go hand in hand. We see sunsets and sunrises, waves and light beams from the lighthouses. The lyrics guide audiences by its upbeat message against a musical background of mostly guitar music and vocals. Congratulations to director Alan J. Chriest works for creating such an inspiring piece. My favorite part is the song, the melody and the singing.

The message is to remind viewers how beautiful the world is, make us feel grateful for that, and remember that taking care of the world is in our hands.

I give All In Our Hands 4.5 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 8 to 18, plus adults.

This would make a great addition to any film festival focusing on the Earth and taking care of our natural surroundings. Reviewed by Heather S., KIDS FIRST!
KIDS FIRST!® Kid Jurors say - I like All In Our Hands! It is a very mellow music video with calming visuals and a heartwarming song.

The film is a montage of lighthouses by the ocean side, on top of cliffs and isolated beaches. The lyrics describe how the whole world is in our hands.

The cinematography is wonderful. The visuals are high quality with impressive and inspiring locations. All the shots are beautiful. The music and the visuals go hand in hand. We see sunsets and sunrises, waves and light beams from the lighthouses. The lyrics guide audiences by its upbeat message against a musical background of mostly guitar music and vocals. Congratulations to director Alan J. Chriest works for creating such an inspiring piece. My favorite part is the song, the melody and the singing.

The message is to remind viewers how beautiful the world is, make us feel grateful for that, and remember that taking care of the world is in our hands.

I give All In Our Hands 4.5 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 8 to 18, plus adults.

This would make a great addition to any film festival focusing on the Earth and taking care of our natural surroundings. Reviewed by Heather S., KIDS FIRST!
Runtime: 4 minutes Juror Recommended Age: 8-18 Suggested Retail Price: $ Media: VIDEO



This title is in the KIDS FIRST! Film Festival - it may not be a regular, endorsed title
FAKE - ALAN CHRIEST / POWERSPASH PROJECT
Series: DOCUMENTARY, AGES 12-18
Description - Fake news is not new - but now it's digital. From click-bait headlines to cyber disinformation, we are easily manipulated. What do we gain and what do we lose by our unquestioned beliefs that control our actions?
KIDS FIRST!® Adult Jurors say - No one can exactly enjoy the latest statistics regarding fake news, but I certainly appreciate the power punch of the short film, Fake. Alan Chriest has written, shot, edited and produced this wake-up-call giving "just the facts, m'am."

Fake gives a quick historical picture of "fake news," which has been around for centuries. But, with today's digital news and social media, "alternate facts" get around at least six times faster than in previous eras. And now, robotic propaganda is one of the greatest engines of misinformation.

Chriest shows how "fake news" manipulates human emotions to the will of governments, religions, racists, corporations, jealous partners and social causes that are dangerous and baseless. Chriest gives no easy fixes, but raises questions and concerns that alert viewers to impending doom if "fake news" is not addressed. People don't know what to believe anymore, what's the truth to one person may be a lie to another. Chriest give a list of resources which do fact checks, but we are reminded that personal responsibility seems to be our best survival skill.

The technical expertise, animation, computer graphics and music that went into making Fake are inspiring and they underscore the narrative with a professional bang.

The message of this film is that misinformation is alive and well globally, and that no one is immune to its negative effects. Take personal responsibility and fact check before you spread or share information.

I give Fake 4.5 out o of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 12 to 18, by Nancy K., KIDS FIRST!
KIDS FIRST!® Kid Jurors say - Fake is fast paced, with lots of flashing images and data that reminds you of the Internet and social media. You definitely feel as if you are on the cyber highway!

This documentary talks about how much fake news is on the Internet, how easily we can be manipulated by fake news, where people get their news in the digital age, and about how much fake news there really is.

It is an interesting topic and eye-opening seeing how many people get their news from Facebook and other online sites. The cinematography is great! Love the introduction; I felt that I was part of the digital world. The introduction is definitely my favorite part; it is incredible. Well done!! The music for the introduction is fabulous. The images are also terrific. There are parts of the film, when the music is too loud. I love the bird "pecking" on the tree and the walk up the stairs and into the house. The "da,d,ad,ad,adat... really draws you in, with a very catchy tune. The film showcases all sorts different of people and made me feel like we are all in this together. The actors are more for visual effect, bringing us all together. It clearly took a lot of hard work to get this film together and give it the feeling it has. To make the point it does it needed a great music director, composer and director - which it does. Given the amount of fake news that's out there, this makes me want to explore more ways to ensure that what I am reading is in fact true. I wanted to see more sites referenced for fact finding so people would know exactly how to fact check. There is a multitude of information to read on the screen at times and some of it is up for such a short time, viewers don't have time to read it. This is definitely a great way to start a discussion about fake news.

The message is that there is a lot of fake news out there and too many people are accepting it as the "real" news.

I give Fake 4 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 12 to 18, plus adults. Reviewed by Evie K., KIDS FIRST!
Runtime: 8 minutes Juror Recommended Age: 12-18 Suggested Retail Price: $ Media: VIDEO



This title is in the KIDS FIRST! Film Festival - it may not be a regular, endorsed title
SKY ON MT. GOLIJA - ALEKSANDAR LEKIC
Series: DOCUMENTARY, AGES 10 - 18
Description - The filmmaker and his family return to Sky, a family-run guesthouse in a picturesque village of Serbia's Mt. Golija. Days of joy, great feasts, nature outings, and bonding with the hosts follow, but this time the stay at Sky has a special emotional significance for the filmmaker.
KIDS FIRST!® Adult Jurors say - Sky on Mt. Golija is an outstanding and inspiring documentary that exposes us to another culture that is unfamiliar to most of us. It shows how the owners of the guesthouse are very hard-working and how challenging it is to keep their guesthouse running.

This documentary by Aleksandar Lekic follows his family's return to Serbia to visit old friends and family at Sky, a family-run guesthouse in a picturesque village of Serbia's Mt. Golija.

We see how much work it takes to live in the country, but also how much fun this family has. The camera work is very good, showing us an insider perspective that tourists would never get to see. The shots vary throughout the film, showing us an intimate perspective of these two families. The film was filmed, edited, written, produced and narrated by Aleksandar Lekic who is behind the camera during the majority of the film. The host at the guest house is Sladja, a former high school math teacher and a hostess extraordinaire. I found it interesting to learn that when people die in Serbia, death notices are posted on poles. Also, I was surprised to learn that they use horse carts to collect garbage. This film teaches kids about other cultures and what it's like to live on a farm there. It also shows the blend of happiness and magic in living a simple life. The narrative is in English, Russian and Serbian, with English subtitles.

There is some profanity in the film. One person swears when he doesn't know the microphone is on; another swears when he gets mad.

The message of this film is to show what a lot of work and perseverance it takes to run a guesthouse and that you have to include some fun while doing it in order to stay sane.

I give Sky on Mt. Golija 4.5 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 10 to 18, plus adults. Reviewed by Connie C., KIDS FIRST!
KIDS FIRST!® Kid Jurors say - Sky on Mt. Golija is an outstanding and inspiring documentary that exposes us to another culture that is unfamiliar to most of us. It shows how the owners of the guesthouse are very hard-working and how challenging it is to keep their guesthouse running.

This documentary by Aleksandar Lekic follows his family's return to Serbia to visit old friends and family at Sky, a family-run guesthouse in a picturesque village of Serbia's Mt. Golija.

We see how much work it takes to live in the country, but also how much fun this family has. The camera work is very good, showing us an insider perspective that tourists would never get to see. The shots vary throughout the film, showing us an intimate perspective of these two families. The film was filmed, edited, written, produced and narrated by Aleksandar Lekic who is behind the camera during the majority of the film. The host at the guest house is Sladja, a former high school math teacher and a hostess extraordinaire. I found it interesting to learn that when people die in Serbia, death notices are posted on poles. Also, I was surprised to learn that they use horse carts to collect garbage. This film teaches kids about other cultures and what it's like to live on a farm there. It also shows the blend of happiness and magic in living a simple life. The narrative is in English, Russian and Serbian, with English subtitles.

There is some profanity in the film. One person swears when he doesn't know the microphone is on; another swears when he gets mad.

The message of this film is to show what a lot of work and perseverance it takes to run a guesthouse and that you have to include some fun while doing it in order to stay sane.

I give Sky on Mt. Golija 4.5 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 10 to 18, plus adults. Reviewed by Connie C., KIDS FIRST!
Runtime: 46 minutes Juror Recommended Age: 10-18 Suggested Retail Price: $ Media: VIDEO



This title is in the KIDS FIRST! Film Festival - it may not be a regular, endorsed title
LIVING SEA, THE - EMA POPOSKA
Series: FOREIGN SHORT, AGES 5-18
Description - We are the only planet with oceans, and they are indispensable for our survival. However, many people are unaware of the importance of ocean creatures and how to protect them. This is because they don't really see them every day. Sea creatures are just lunch or dinner or an ingredient in cosmetics. Young scuba diver Ema Poposka believes if people could see the beauty of the ocean and of the corals, they will change their minds about sea protection. This inspired her to join Action for a Cause to produce a documentary film about Hong Kong corals. Ema's aim with the documentary film made by kids is to raise awareness about the uniqueness of Hong Kong corals, the need to start taking care of corals, and how we can do this in our everyday life. This documentary was made by a crew of 12-15 year old students.
KIDS FIRST!® Adult Jurors say - Get ready to dive into the ocean depths of Hong Kong when you watch The Living Sea. The coral in these seas are struggling to survive because of warmer water and large amounts of waste. Learn how climate change is affecting this species and what you can do to stop it.

The Living Sea is an interesting short film that is a perfect fit for anyone who likes coral or people who want to learn more about ocean life. The underwater views are very cool as they bring you up close to the sea life. Interesting visuals, such as maps and graphs, are used to help you understand where you are and the scientists and activists that are interviewed are informative and engaging.

This is a documentary that offers lots of informative. At the beginning, there is a bit of a backstory about the narrator, which definitely adds to the film's entertainment quality. The underwater views are one of the strongest aspects of this film as it shows us many colorful and cool looking coral as well as a pretty, blue ocean. Along with the constantly beautiful close ups of the coral there are magnificent views of the mountains surrounding Hong Kong. The shots really capture the beauty of the mountains and the river snaking through them. The shots of the water reflecting the mountains are some of the best images I've ever laid my eyes on. The locations are captivating; even during some of the interviews there are lakes and mountains in the background. The sets in the labs where experiments with the coral take place are a cool addition to the film. The key people in this film are the narrator and the people interviewed. They keep it interesting and entertaining, plus they give good advice on how to protect coral and other sea life. The underwater views, combined with the interesting and educational narrative, are my favorite parts of this film. It is a truly spectacular combination.

There are many sad truths revealed in this film, like how all coral could be extinct by 2050 if we don't do anything to prevent that. So the message is that reducing waste, lessening our carbon footprint and conclusively helping corals, is a very important cause.

I give The Living Sea 4 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 5 to 18, plus adults. This is an interesting and entertaining watch that I highly recommend. Reviewed by Kyla C., KIDS FIRST!
KIDS FIRST!® Kid Jurors say - Get ready to dive into the ocean depths of Hong Kong when you watch The Living Sea. The coral in these seas are struggling to survive because of warmer water and large amounts of waste. Learn how climate change is affecting this species and what you can do to stop it.

The Living Sea is an interesting short film that is a perfect fit for anyone who likes coral or people who want to learn more about ocean life. The underwater views are very cool as they bring you up close to the sea life. Interesting visuals, such as maps and graphs, are used to help you understand where you are and the scientists and activists that are interviewed are informative and engaging.

This is a documentary that offers lots of informative. At the beginning, there is a bit of a backstory about the narrator, which definitely adds to the film's entertainment quality. The underwater views are one of the strongest aspects of this film as it shows us many colorful and cool looking coral as well as a pretty, blue ocean. Along with the constantly beautiful close ups of the coral there are magnificent views of the mountains surrounding Hong Kong. The shots really capture the beauty of the mountains and the river snaking through them. The shots of the water reflecting the mountains are some of the best images I've ever laid my eyes on. The locations are captivating; even during some of the interviews there are lakes and mountains in the background. The sets in the labs where experiments with the coral take place are a cool addition to the film. The key people in this film are the narrator and the people interviewed. They keep it interesting and entertaining, plus they give good advice on how to protect coral and other sea life. The underwater views, combined with the interesting and educational narrative, are my favorite parts of this film. It is a truly spectacular combination.

There are many sad truths revealed in this film, like how all coral could be extinct by 2050 if we don't do anything to prevent that. So the message is that reducing waste, lessening our carbon footprint and conclusively helping corals, is a very important cause.

I give The Living Sea 4 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 5 to 18, plus adults. This is an interesting and entertaining watch that I highly recommend. Reviewed by Kyla C., KIDS FIRST!
Runtime: 15 minutes Juror Recommended Age: 5-18 Suggested Retail Price: $ Media: VIDEO



This title is in the KIDS FIRST! Film Festival - it may not be a regular, endorsed title
SAUSAGE RUN, THE - THOMAS STELLMACH
Series: ENVIRONMENTAL SHORT, AGES 12-18
Description - An animated short film which, with the help of multiple Zoetropes, tells the tragic story of a little lamb, loosely based on the Little Red Riding Hood fairy tale.

The Little Red Riding Hood fairy tale provides the main storyline. However, the roles of the humans and animals are exchanged: the human characters in the film are depicted as anthropomorphous animals. The animal in the story, the big bad wolf, is here a human being.

Little Red Riding Hood's family consists of the mother sheep, the lamb (Little Red Riding Hood) and a grandfather sheep. The forester and his wife are dogs with a soft spot for sausages. The wolf, a butcher, is a man with a serious problem - he has run out of meat.
KIDS FIRST!® Adult Jurors say - I found the animated short, The Sausage Run, very engaging. The visual qualities and the concepts are exciting and clever. I was engaged immediately and watched it more than once to allow myself opportunity to see more details.

This film portrays three generations of sheep and the impact of humans or animals representing humans on the sheep family, using the Little Red Riding Hood story as a takeoff point.

Even without dialogue, the story is very easy to follow. The use of a zoetrope (optical disk) is very cleverly incorporated into the film. The protagonists conduct their lives in five separate zoetrope. The representations of animal demise is cleverly done and thought provoking at same time. The animation is excellent, although there are some specks on the video that make it look as if it's an old film print. As the various story threads progress, the viewer descends into each of the circles and thus has a feeling of overseeing each character's purpose in the story. The characters are all well imagined and drawn and the costumes they wear help clearly identify their individual roles. It's set in a forest with remote huts, which helps support the Little Red Riding Hood theme. The background music works very well in setting the pace and enhancing the emotions. The main characters are sheep and the generational gap between them is clearly and easily denoted. The main human's purpose and impact on their lives is very well shown. A dog serves as the park ranger; his role is both as protector and possibly a threat at same time, which is a clever use of the character traits. The film certainly makes the viewer interested in the concept of zoetropes and wanting to know more about them plus it brings up the question of using animals as food.

The message of the film is about the impact of humans using animals for food. It does contain acts of violence and, while the violence is implied by a blank screen, it is an important part of the story. One character has a knife and another has a gun, both of which are implied as the implements of death. Also, we see the resultant sausages, presumably made from one of the animals.

I give The Sausage Run 4.5 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 12 to 18, plus adults. While the subject and content could be upsetting to some people, the beautiful nature of the animation and the different concept of zoetrope is very interesting and many people will enjoy that unique aspect of this film.

Reviewed by Richard L., KIDS FIRST!
KIDS FIRST!® Kid Jurors say - found the animated short, The Sausage Run, very engaging. The visual qualities and the concepts are exciting and clever. I was engaged immediately and watched it more than once to allow myself opportunity to see more details.

This film portrays three generations of sheep and the impact of humans or animals representing humans on the sheep family, using the Little Red Riding Hood story as a takeoff point.

Even without dialogue, the story is very easy to follow. The use of a zoetrope (optical disk) is very cleverly incorporated into the film. The protagonists conduct their lives in five separate zoetrope. The representations of animal demise is cleverly done and thought provoking at same time. The animation is excellent, although there are some specks on the video that make it look as if it's an old film print. As the various story threads progress, the viewer descends into each of the circles and thus has a feeling of overseeing each character's purpose in the story. The characters are all well imagined and drawn and the costumes they wear help clearly identify their individual roles. It's set in a forest with remote huts, which helps support the Little Red Riding Hood theme. The background music works very well in setting the pace and enhancing the emotions. The main characters are sheep and the generational gap between them is clearly and easily denoted. The main human's purpose and impact on their lives is very well shown. A dog serves as the park ranger; his role is both as protector and possibly a threat at same time, which is a clever use of the character traits. The film certainly makes the viewer interested in the concept of zoetropes and wanting to know more about them plus it brings up the question of using animals as food.

The message of the film is about the impact of humans using animals for food. It does contain acts of violence and, while the violence is implied by a blank screen, it is an important part of the story. One character has a knife and another has a gun, both of which are implied as the implements of death. Also, we see the resultant sausages, presumably made from one of the animals.

I give The Sausage Run 4.5 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 12 to 18, plus adults. While the subject and content could be upsetting to some people, the beautiful nature of the animation and the different concept of zoetrope is very interesting and many people will enjoy that unique aspect of this film.

Reviewed by Richard L., KIDS FIRST!
Runtime: 10 minutes Juror Recommended Age: 12-18 Suggested Retail Price: $ Media: VIDEO



This title is in the KIDS FIRST! Film Festival - it may not be a regular, endorsed title
RUMPA - BENTE MAALEN
Series: FOREIGN SHORT, AGE 13-18
Description - Fifteen-year-old Pauline commits social suicide in class and in front of her idol, film star Ingvar Lykke, when she accidentally posts a private snap. But instead of dying of shame, she rebels against an ocean of unwritten rules.
KIDS FIRST!® Adult Jurors say - What I like about Rumpa is that we watch a young girl standing up to her idol and for what she believes. She is not afraid to say what she believes about him, even though she used to idolize him. She stands up in front of the whole class when she knows that she will be made fun of and tells the entire class that what her idol was saying was wrong.

A young girl's idol comes into her class. She does not agree with what he says when talking in a character and tells the class that.

I like that the storyline gives context for why the young girl acts the way she does. It follows a story arc that makes sense. The camera work is very good. The shots in the bathroom stall impressed me the most, because we see both the young girl and her best friend in two separate stalls talking through the wall, which makes it more dramatic. The sets suit the story; it takes place in a school. The music when the protagonist is daydreaming enhances the feelings she has towards the actor at that time. The music is dramatic and kind of romantic. I particularly like the ending song. Pauline (Milla Reppen-Gjelseth)'s character development is well sequenced; you can tell that she has idolized the actor for a long time and we also see that she does not like to be made fun of. Her speech to him is spot on, well delivered. I especially like when she calls him on thinking that Ophelia's suicide is romantic - and points out how it is an issue with teens today. That is very well spoken and poignant. Martin's (Siver Sablagi-Eltoft) character development also is handled well; from the beginning you can tell that he is in love with Pauline and it develops naturally throughout the short film. The story flows very well. My favorite part of the film is the ending because it shows that her best friend is there for her always. The dialogue is in Norwegian with English subtitles.

The message is to stand up for what you believe. There is some partial nudity when one character has his shirt off; another person is in front of him so you hardly notice it.

I give Rumpa 4.5 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 13 to 18, plus adults. By Lorelei T. and Julie S., KIDS FIRST!
KIDS FIRST!® Kid Jurors say - What I like about Rumpa is that we watch a young girl standing up to her idol and for what she believes. She is not afraid to say what she believes about him, even though she used to idolize him. She stands up in front of the whole class when she knows that she will be made fun of and tells the entire class that what her idol was saying was wrong.

A young girl's idol comes into her class. She does not agree with what he says when talking in a character and tells the class that.

I like that the storyline gives context for why the young girl acts the way she does. It follows a story arc that makes sense. The camera work is very good. The shots in the bathroom stall impressed me the most, because we see both the young girl and her best friend in two separate stalls talking through the wall, which makes it more dramatic. The sets suit the story; it takes place in a school. The music when the protagonist is daydreaming enhances the feelings she has towards the actor at that time. The music is dramatic and kind of romantic. I particularly like the ending song. Pauline (Milla Reppen-Gjelseth)'s character development is well sequenced; you can tell that she has idolized the actor for a long time and we also see that she does not like to be made fun of. Her speech to him is spot on, well delivered. I especially like when she calls him on thinking that Ophelia's suicide is romantic - and points out how it is an issue with teens today. That is very well spoken and poignant. Martin's (Siver Sablagi-Eltoft) character development also is handled well; from the beginning you can tell that he is in love with Pauline and it develops naturally throughout the short film. The story flows very well. My favorite part of the film is the ending because it shows that her best friend is there for her always. The dialogue is in Norwegian with English subtitles.

The message is to stand up for what you believe. There is some partial nudity when one character has his shirt off; another person is in front of him so you hardly notice it.

I give Rumpa 4.5 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 13 to 18, plus adults. By Lorelei T. and Julie S., KIDS FIRST!
Runtime: 14 minutes Juror Recommended Age: 12-18 Suggested Retail Price: $ Media: VIDEO



This title is in the KIDS FIRST! Film Festival - it may not be a regular, endorsed title
BUNNY OR MONKEY? - ANNA LOBACHEVA
Series: INDIE SHORT, AGES 3-6
Description - The animated series touches upon the problem of self-identification of children born in mixed-race families, using the example of a 5-year-old girl named Zabezoo, whose mother is a rabbit doe and father is a monkey.

Zabezoo gazed at her grandparents' family photos for a very long time. When she looked in the mirror She couldn't get this one big question out her mind.
KIDS FIRST!® Adult Jurors say - Bunny or Monkey is an adorable animated short that I really like. It is a bit childish, but it is cute and has a good lesson behind it.

The storyline follows Zaebezoo, the protagonist, who wants to know if she is a monkey or a bunny. So Zaebezoo goes around asking both of her parents which one she is and, in the end, she finds out that she does not have to be told or choose.

I like that the story has a purpose and that, in the end, the main character learns something. The 2D animation is cute and adorable. The little costumes fit the characters personalities so well and they also fit the storyline. There are different locations, which is another reason why I like it. Zaebezoo's house and front yard are very detailed.

The music in the story seems to be spot on. There are visual effects when Zaebezoo is thinking about all the different foods and it looks cool. There are four characters in this short: the bully is the guy who made Zaebezoo insecure in the first place; the dad is part monkey and tells her that she is a monkey first; the mom is a bunny who tells her that she is a bunny first. There is character development with Zaebezoo where she realizes that she does not have to be a bunny or a monkey; she can be both. She realizes this when she sees a sun shower for the first time. I learned that I can be more than one thing if I want to be. My favorite part is when Zaebezoo finds out that she can just be herself, which is more than one thing.

The message is to be who you want and don't question yourself because of others.

I give Bunny or Monkey 4.5 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 3 to 6.

SaniyaRain F., KIDS FIRST
KIDS FIRST!® Kid Jurors say - Bunny or Monkey is an adorable animated short that I really like. It is a bit childish, but it is cute and has a good lesson behind it.

The storyline follows Zaebezoo, the protagonist, who wants to know if she is a monkey or a bunny. So Zaebezoo goes around asking both of her parents which one she is and, in the end, she finds out that she does not have to be told or choose.

I like that the story has a purpose and that, in the end, the main character learns something. The 2D animation is cute and adorable. The little costumes fit the characters personalities so well and they also fit the storyline. There are different locations, which is another reason why I like it. Zaebezoo's house and front yard are very detailed.

The music in the story seems to be spot on. There are visual effects when Zaebezoo is thinking about all the different foods and it looks cool. There are four characters in this short: the bully is the guy who made Zaebezoo insecure in the first place; the dad is part monkey and tells her that she is a monkey first; the mom is a bunny who tells her that she is a bunny first. There is character development with Zaebezoo where she realizes that she does not have to be a bunny or a monkey; she can be both. She realizes this when she sees a sun shower for the first time. I learned that I can be more than one thing if I want to be. My favorite part is when Zaebezoo finds out that she can just be herself, which is more than one thing.

The message is to be who you want and don't question yourself because of others.

I give Bunny or Monkey 4.5 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 3 to 6.

SaniyaRain F., KIDS FIRST
Runtime: 6 minutes Juror Recommended Age: 3-6 Suggested Retail Price: $ Media: VIDEO



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