KIDS FIRST! has endorsed 1511 total Video titles

Below are up to 26 of them

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This title is in the KIDS FIRST! Film Festival - it may not be a regular, endorsed title
EARS N' TAIL
EARS N' TAIL - ALINA ZOLOTAREVA
Series: SHORT AGES 4-18, ANIMATION
Description - The animated series touches upon the problem of self-identification of children born in mixed-race families, using the example of a 5-year-old girl named Zabezoo, whose mother is a rabbit doe and her father is a monkey. Each episode is one small adventure story where Zabezoo and her friends discover or learn something new.
KIDS FIRST!® Adult Jurors say - Ears N' Tail is a cute animated film that I think everybody can relate to. It's great for kids as it tells the tale of a five-year-old girl named Zabezoo and how she loves to sleep.

Zabezoo is a young girl who just wants to sleep and finish her dreams. This adorable film shows you how she navigates this problem and how her parents also help.

The 2D animation is impressive and professional. The storyline is great for young kids and has a very relatable message about wanting to sleep. It holds your attention. The characters wear PJs and work clothes that looks like what anyone might wear. The story takes place in Zabezoo's home, which is built in a tree. The background music is very whimsical and fun. All the voice over talent is terrific. Zabezoo is voiced by Jillian Menees; Mom is voiced by Courtney Wohl. Dad is voiced by Dylan Mcclosky. Storyteller is voiced by William Pica. They all have very distinctive voices and it's easy to tell them apart.

The message is about sleeping well. When Zabezoo turns off her parents' alarm clock, all havoc breaks loose.

I give this film 4 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 4 to 18, plus adults. It is very kid-friendly and would play well at a festival for kids and families. The only thing I find perplexing is the description of the film. It seems to have nothing to do with what happens in this film.

Reviewed by Ava H., KIDS FIRST! Film Critic
KIDS FIRST!® Kid Jurors say - Ears N' Tail is a cute animated film that I think everybody can relate to. It's great for kids as it tells the tale of a five-year-old girl named Zabezoo and how she loves to sleep.

Zabezoo is a young girl who just wants to sleep and finish her dreams. This adorable film shows you how she navigates this problem and how her parents also help.

The 2D animation is impressive and professional. The storyline is great for young kids and has a very relatable message about wanting to sleep. It holds your attention. The characters wear PJs and work clothes that looks like what anyone might wear. The story takes place in Zabezoo's home, which is built in a tree. The background music is very whimsical and fun. All the voice over talent is terrific. Zabezoo is voiced by Jillian Menees; Mom is voiced by Courtney Wohl. Dad is voiced by Dylan Mcclosky. Storyteller is voiced by William Pica. They all have very distinctive voices and it's easy to tell them apart.

The message is about sleeping well. When Zabezoo turns off her parents' alarm clock, all havoc breaks loose.

I give this film 4 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 4 to 18, plus adults. It is very kid-friendly and would play well at a festival for kids and families. The only thing I find perplexing is the description of the film. It seems to have nothing to do with what happens in this film.

Reviewed by Ava H., KIDS FIRST! Film Critic
Runtime: 5 minutes Juror Recommended Age: 4-18 Suggested Retail Price: $ Media: VIDEO



This title is in the KIDS FIRST! Film Festival - it may not be a regular, endorsed title
JACK AND THE TREEHOUSE
JACK AND THE TREEHOUSE - JIM SCHNEIDER
Series: FEATURE 10-18
Description - A 10 year-old tries to stop his Dad from selling the family land.
KIDS FIRST!® Adult Jurors say - I enjoyed this movie very much! It replicates what might have happened in real life when a family is hit by hard times and they have something valuable to sell. This is true when the family has a vast amount of land that was once owned by Jack's grandfather. I also like that it is Jack, a 10-year-old who has the will stay true to his own beliefs, without getting swayed by grown-ups. This is like David vs. Goliath as his dad has the power to make the decision of selling the land but David, who is Jack, is willing to defend it. The other thing that strikes me is how greed affects people. Dan, the father, wants the money so badly, because it can transform their life, which is what a lot of people want. The idea of transforming their lives by selling heirlooms that are very valuable are something not uncommon.

The story follows Jack and his family when they are hit with hard times and Jack's father decides to sell their inherited land, but Jack his plans to stop it.

I like the fact that the story line is built around an idea that has been around for as long as people have been around - greediness. The camera work is quite good, making use of various camera angles. Once instance shows metaphorically how Jack has superiority over the adults. The set with Jack's grandfather's shed is very pertinent and realistic looking. The background music is a mix of lighthearted and heavyhearted music. The most standout music are the heavyhearted ones, where Jack's father keeps saying that he will win the battle. The music is a perfect compliment to show Jack's hopelessness. The acting is very believable, especially Dan, Jack's dad (Dave Mansueto), who drinks alcohol to cope with the stress and frustration of being out of work and unable to support his family. Dan later shows another side as he tries to persuade Jack to come down from his tree house and give up his hope of preserving the forest. Pap (Cotter Smith) is also well portrayed as he shows his frustration with his son who feels the only solution their money problems are to sell the land. Jack (Eamonn McElfresh) is well played as he displayes his frustration with his father and the love of his grandfather. The key influencers are the director and the visual designer. My hats off to them both as this is well directed and the visual components are all outstanding. My favorite part of the film is when Jack's father finally decides to apologize to Jack and decides to not sell the woods but to preserve it for Jack's sons and daughters to enjoy. This scene displays the idea that no matter how strong the opposing forces are, if you work hard enough, you will be able to defeat it and accomplish your goal.

The message of the film is that stay true to yourself and if you keep on trying for what you wanted to achieve, you will achieve that goal.

I give this film 5 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 10 to 18, plus adults. Reviewed by Tom W., KIDS FIRST!
KIDS FIRST!® Kid Jurors say - Jack and the Treehouse is appealing, because the story focuses on a kid who stands for what he believes. The kid has perseverance and never gives up. Plus, the plot is interesting and holds your attention.

The storyline focuses on a young boy named Jack (Eamonn McElfresh) whose grandfather (Cotter Smith) whom he shares a special bond with, passes away. After the grandfather's death, his father (Dave Mansueto) continues his plan to cut down the woods, but Jack may put a stop to it.

I like that the story focuses on the power of a child. Many kids believe their voices aren't heard, but this film is the exact opposite. I didn't like that the plot starts to become less believable towards the end, when the father admits defeat and apologizes. The production values are quite good although some of the camera work is a bit shaky and, at times, the lighting is inadequate. The background music fits the tone of the various scenes. The rural setting is perfect. The young boy that plays Jack is excellent. He shows his determination, a bit of shyness and how he is just an average young boy. Cotter Smith plays Pap well, with a fun and happy demeanor. My favorite scene is when Gwen helps Jack with his wound. It's very sweet and heartwarming.

The message of the film is to never give up. Jack works hard enough and finally achieves his goal. Throughout the movie he dedicated, which sets a good example of reminding kids to follow their dreams and commit to achieving them. There is a small bit of profanity and drinking of alcohol. Also, there is some risky behavior such as when Jack stays at the top of the tree house, putting himself in danger.

I give this film 4 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 8 to 18, plus adults. This is a good family film that would stimulate some good conversation afterwards. Reviewed by Kendall B., KIDS FIRST! Film Critic
Runtime: 77 minutes Juror Recommended Age: 10-18 Suggested Retail Price: $ Media: VIDEO



This title is in the KIDS FIRST! Film Festival - it may not be a regular, endorsed title
ROBIN HOOD
ROBIN HOOD - NANCY FIASCHETTI
Series: FEATURE FILM AGES 10-18
Description - When the Pied Piper Children's Theatre needed to re-imagine their teen play that would normally happen in the fall, our director decided to attempt something that Pied Piper had never done before... shoot a film instead, using our northern Manhattan parks and forests as the backdrop and with Covid-19 safety measures in place on the film shoot days. Zoom rehearsals took place first, and then four episodes were shot on four consecutive Saturdays in October 2020. In this retelling of the ancient legend, you'll meet Robin, Marian, Will Scarlett, Friar Tuck, and the merry band as you've never seen them before. Can this clever band of thieves with hearts of gold foil the Sheriff of Nottingham and his men in their evil plans, and bring peace and prosperity to Sherwood? Tune in to find out!
KIDS FIRST!® Adult Jurors say - The movie Robin Hood has a great storyline and is filled with action. I love all the young actors in this and how they managed to shoot it during the COVID-19 quarantine. The storyline retains the idea of Robin Hood, who is a skilled archer and sword fighter. I also enjoy that it shows how the sheriff's greediness and cruelty eventually got the better of him, showing how abuse of power can have problems. Despite being a low budget movie, the quality is good.

The story follows Robin Hood and his friends who are trying to fight against the plan the sheriff and his group has to make money for himself.

First of all, kudos for rehearsing this film entirely online and shooting it outside adhering to COVID protocols. What an interesting challenge and what great results. I like how the story shows the positive side of Robin Hood, which is as someone who fights villains and advocates for the poor. I dislike that there is so much male dominance throughout the sheriff of Nottingham's group, particularly when the young girl, Cedric, is bossed around by two men. I like how the action is evenly split between Robin Hood's group and sheriff's gang, which makes the movie unbiased towards neither group. The first scene that wowed me is when the two children who are very poor steal apples and are running away - the camera deftly jumps in between the thief and the sheriff's team, which is great camera work. The other scene that impressed me is the fighting scene at the end of the movie, which was impressively filmed on a cellphone. The costumes suit the 13th Century time period quite well. The one that impressed me most is the iconic Robin Hood costume, which is very well recreated. The forest location is shot in northern Manhattan parts, and come across quite fitting for the story's Sherwood Forest. I like that they stayed true to replicating a forest setting. I missed that there is not too much shown for the lady of Sherwood's residence, as that would show she is a noble. The background music is very upbeat suitable for the period. It enhances but does not distract, which is very important. The standout music is the piece that plays during the very end of movie, which is a fight scene. It makes the scene more exciting.

I love every aspect of the production! The young actors in this production are all very skilled. The above the line talent is equally talented. The Costume Designer, Janet Mervin, gets a big thumbs-up from me for keeping the costumes true to the period. The screenwriter wrote a very family-friendly script. The Fight Director, Adam Burby, really pulled off some winning scenes. The musical score by Omar Camps-Kamrin is spot on. The Director of Photography comes through with excellent camera work. Whomever was responsible for the audio recording of the cast also gets a big thumbs-up. And, the Director, Leslie Kincaid Burby, really gets a big round of applause for delivering such a delightful film with the young performers. Rob Reiner, look out! Great editing! Ending credits are terrific.

My favorite part of the film is at the end when Robin Hood's group finally defeats the sheriff's group. Lady Griselda punishes the money-thirsty, cruel sheriff and his people by removing him from his position and deporting him. Robin Hood is given the opportunity of becoming the new sheriff, due to his honesty and heroic deeds. I like seeing that good deeds will earn you good return while doing bad deeds will give you a bad return.

The message is so pertinent to today's politics in emphasizing the importance of being honest and not abusing your power. Parents should be aware that it does shows kids doing risky things that some kids might imitate. There are sword fights and bows and arrows used, which could be dangerous if young kids used them without knowing how to safely do so.

I give Robin Hood 5 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 10 to 18, plus adults. It lovingly portrays the legend that is paramount to our history and important for young audiences to learn about. Its lessons about honesty are very important along with the idea of how greed and abuse of power are harmful. Reviewed by Tom W., KIDS FIRST!
KIDS FIRST!® Kid Jurors say - The movie Robin Hood has a great storyline and is filled with action. I love all the young actors in this and how they managed to shoot it during the COVID-19 quarantine. The storyline retains the idea of Robin Hood, who is a skilled archer and sword fighter. I also enjoy that it shows how the sheriff's greediness and cruelty eventually got the better of him, showing how abuse of power can have problems. Despite being a low budget movie, the quality is good.

The story follows Robin Hood and his friends who are trying to fight against the plan the sheriff and his group has to make money for himself.

First of all, kudos for rehearsing this film entirely online and shooting it outside adhering to COVID protocols. What an interesting challenge and what great results. I like how the story shows the positive side of Robin Hood, which is as someone who fights villains and advocates for the poor. I dislike that there is so much male dominance throughout the sheriff of Nottingham's group, particularly when the young girl, Cedric, is bossed around by two men. I like how the action is evenly split between Robin Hood's group and sheriff's gang, which makes the movie unbiased towards neither group. The first scene that wowed me is when the two children who are very poor steal apples and are running away - the camera deftly jumps in between the thief and the sheriff's team, which is great camera work. The other scene that impressed me is the fighting scene at the end of the movie, which was impressively filmed on a cellphone. The costumes suit the 13th Century time period quite well. The one that impressed me most is the iconic Robin Hood costume, which is very well recreated. The forest location is shot in northern Manhattan parts, and come across quite fitting for the story's Sherwood Forest. I like that they stayed true to replicating a forest setting. I missed that there is not too much shown for the lady of Sherwood's residence, as that would show she is a noble. The background music is very upbeat suitable for the period. It enhances but does not distract, which is very important. The standout music is the piece that plays during the very end of movie, which is a fight scene. It makes the scene more exciting.

I love every aspect of the production! The young actors in this production are all very skilled. The above the line talent is equally talented. The Costume Designer, Janet Mervin, gets a big thumbs-up from me for keeping the costumes true to the period. The screenwriter wrote a very family-friendly script. The Fight Director, Adam Burby, really pulled off some winning scenes. The musical score by Omar Camps-Kamrin is spot on. The Director of Photography comes through with excellent camera work. Whomever was responsible for the audio recording of the cast also gets a big thumbs-up. And, the Director, Leslie Kincaid Burby, really gets a big round of applause for delivering such a delightful film with the young performers. Rob Reiner, look out! Great editing! Ending credits are terrific.

My favorite part of the film is at the end when Robin Hood's group finally defeats the sheriff's group. Lady Griselda punishes the money-thirsty, cruel sheriff and his people by removing him from his position and deporting him. Robin Hood is given the opportunity of becoming the new sheriff, due to his honesty and heroic deeds. I like seeing that good deeds will earn you good return while doing bad deeds will give you a bad return.

The message is so pertinent to today's politics in emphasizing the importance of being honest and not abusing your power. Parents should be aware that it does shows kids doing risky things that some kids might imitate. There are sword fights and bows and arrows used, which could be dangerous if young kids used them without knowing how to safely do so.

I give Robin Hood 5 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 10 to 18, plus adults. It lovingly portrays the legend that is paramount to our history and important for young audiences to learn about. Its lessons about honesty are very important along with the idea of how greed and abuse of power are harmful. Reviewed by Tom W., KIDS FIRST!
Runtime: 61 minutes Juror Recommended Age: 10-18 Suggested Retail Price: $ Media: VIDEO



This title is in the KIDS FIRST! Film Festival - it may not be a regular, endorsed title
WHAT TO DO WITH YOUR TABLOID NEWS
WHAT TO DO WITH YOUR TABLOID NEWS - MARLENE SHARP
Series: STUDENT FILM, AGES 8 TO 14
Description - In the last year, there sure has been a lot of news; much of it is bad news. But YOU can do something about bad news; watch this film and learn how to recycle, reuse, and recover!

All 20 credited writer/directors (below) have received a diagnosis of being on the autism spectrum.
KIDS FIRST!® Adult Jurors say - What To Do With Your Tabloid News has a good sense of humor. It takes an issue that many have experienced this past year and turns it into something that many can participate in.

This film asks the question, "What can we do with the tabloid news?" The answer is a quirky response.

The film is very short so the examples of what to do with our tabloid news or why recycling is important are limited. The camera work is okay, nothing is outstanding. However, I do like the addition of stop motion creation of origami, which adds a nice touch. The message, about recycling (or up-cycling) bad news into something else hits home. I like that the simple backdrop; it shows creativity. The background music is pretty unobtrusive - not adding or detracting from the film. I do love the sense of humor. The entire production team seems to have a great sense of humor; even the end credits gave me a quick laugh. The stop motion and the funny text scenes are my favorite. The fact that this film was created by a team of adult students on the autism spectrum makes this even more interesting. The only thing that doesn't work for me so well, is the use of text to get the message across. It's not particularly creative, though it does get the job done.

The message of the film is to take what is 'bad,' evaluate it, and find the good. Oh, and recycle or up-cycle.

I give this short student film 3 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 8 to 14. Reviewed by Ashleigh C. and Julie S., KIDS FIRST!
KIDS FIRST!® Kid Jurors say - What To Do With Your Tabloid News has a good sense of humor. It takes an issue that many have experienced this past year and turns it into something that many can participate in.

This film asks the question, "What can we do with the tabloid news?" The answer is a quirky response.

The film is very short so the examples of what to do with our tabloid news or why recycling is important are limited. The camera work is okay, nothing is outstanding. However, I do like the addition of stop motion creation of origami, which adds a nice touch. The message, about recycling (or up-cycling) bad news into something else hits home. I like that the simple backdrop; it shows creativity. The background music is pretty unobtrusive - not adding or detracting from the film. I do love the sense of humor. The entire production team seems to have a great sense of humor; even the end credits gave me a quick laugh. The stop motion and the funny text scenes are my favorite. The fact that this film was created by a team of adult students on the autism spectrum makes this even more interesting. The only thing that doesn't work for me so well, is the use of text to get the message across. It's not particularly creative, though it does get the job done.

The message of the film is to take what is 'bad,' evaluate it, and find the good. Oh, and recycle or up-cycle.

I give this short student film 3 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 8 to 14. Reviewed by Ashleigh C. and Julie S., KIDS FIRST!
Runtime: 2 minutes Juror Recommended Age: 8-14 Suggested Retail Price: $ Media: VIDEO



This title is in the KIDS FIRST! Film Festival - it may not be a regular, endorsed title
LIBERTY BELL AND THE ASSEMBLY OF FREEDOM, THE
LIBERTY BELL AND THE ASSEMBLY OF FREEDOM, THE - CARTER STOUDT
Series: STUDENT FILM, AGES 10 TO 18
Description - The Liberty Bell was once a vital communication method that helped us win the war, and changed America forever. Without the Liberty Bell, quite possibly America wouldn't be the same today.

Philadelphia served as the first Capitol of our nation and its treasures and historic landmarks are the backdrops of this film which looks back at the Liberty Bell and the captivating stories behind this symbol.
KIDS FIRST!® Adult Jurors say - I learned so much by watching the student made film The Liberty Bell and The Assembly of Freedom. This is a beautiful documentary with moving archived images, new footage and thoughtful interviews that support the Liberty Bell story.

This documentary provides information and history about the Liberty Bell and how it shaped American history. The film highlights how bells were once vital communication tools within a community.

What impressed me most is the excellent research that 14-year-old Carter Stoudt brings to this film and the historical impact he reveals about the Liberty Bell. His interviews with contemporary historians bring additional insight to the story.

The filming and editing are amazing. I was astonished that this was filmed and edited by someone only slightly older than me. I loved the footage of the Liberty Bell itself and its housing. The Colonial costumes and footage are great and I suspect they were provided by the museum that are cited. The production is truly first rate, from the camera work to the historical locations. The interview footage were not as meaningful from a setting perspective and it appears that at least one interview was filmed via Zoom, but the content of the interview is terrific. The background music supports the historical theme. There are no special effects, but the editing is top notch. Fourteen-year-old Carter Stoudt is the producer, co-writer and director. Nolan Watkins is the co-writer and narrator. Nolan's narration is very steady. It is a bit emotionless perhaps, but he articulates clearly and calmly. My hats off to them both as it is a beautiful production. My favorite part was seeing all the various dignitaries that have visited the bell from Queen Elizabeth to the Dalai Lama, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., Nelson Mandela, Bill Clinton and more.

It's fun and important to learn more about American history and to seek resources outside of textbooks to further our knowledge.

I give this film 5 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 10 to 18, plus adults. Reviewed by Selene W., KIDS FIRST!
KIDS FIRST!® Kid Jurors say - I learned so much by watching the student made film The Liberty Bell and The Assembly of Freedom. This is a beautiful documentary with moving archived images, new footage and thoughtful interviews that support the Liberty Bell story.

This documentary provides information and history about the Liberty Bell and how it shaped American history. The film highlights how bells were once vital communication tools within a community.

What impressed me most is the excellent research that 14-year-old Carter Stoudt brings to this film and the historical impact he reveals about the Liberty Bell. His interviews with contemporary historians bring additional insight to the story.

The filming and editing are amazing. I was astonished that this was filmed and edited by someone only slightly older than me. I loved the footage of the Liberty Bell itself and its housing. The Colonial costumes and footage are great and I suspect they were provided by the museum that are cited. The production is truly first rate, from the camera work to the historical locations. The interview footage were not as meaningful from a setting perspective and it appears that at least one interview was filmed via Zoom, but the content of the interview is terrific. The background music supports the historical theme. There are no special effects, but the editing is top notch. Fourteen-year-old Carter Stoudt is the producer, co-writer and director. Nolan Watkins is the co-writer and narrator. Nolan's narration is very steady. It is a bit emotionless perhaps, but he articulates clearly and calmly. My hats off to them both as it is a beautiful production. My favorite part was seeing all the various dignitaries that have visited the bell from Queen Elizabeth to the Dalai Lama, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., Nelson Mandela, Bill Clinton and more.

It's fun and important to learn more about American history and to seek resources outside of textbooks to further our knowledge.

I give this film 5 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 10 to 18, plus adults. Reviewed by Selene W., KIDS FIRST!
Runtime: 10 minutes Juror Recommended Age: 10-18 Suggested Retail Price: $ Media: VIDEO



This title is in the KIDS FIRST! Film Festival - it may not be a regular, endorsed title
MILK
MILK - CELIA JASPERS
Series: FOREIGN SHORT, AGES 8-18
Description - When she sees an old man unable to pay for his milk, a young girl has a change of heart.
KIDS FIRST!® Adult Jurors say - What a beautiful film that addresses a not uncommon issue with our elderly - food insecurity. For elders in our communities with limited income, this has become something that everyone should be aware of.

Milk features a young girl (Charlotte Jaspers) counting her change so she can buy herself a treat at the coffee shop nearby. But when she sees an old man (Frank Edwards) who doesn't have enough money to buy himself milk, she steps in and out of kindness.

The film is beautifully created with outstanding camerawork, beautiful locations and tremendous acting and terrific direction. The little girl's behavior is so charmingly real. You can almost hear her think, thanks to Celia Jasper's direction. The old man is also well played and the shopkeeper (Christy-Anne Sullivan) makes an impactful statement at the end, when she accepts the girls' change without counting it, as enough.

Food insecurity because of lack of money and other resources is such a sad statement of our times, when it really shouldn't exist. I highly recommend this film for ages 8 to 18, plus adults. It would play well at a film festival or special screening and is a conduit for a greater conversation on the topic of food insecurity. Reviewed by Julie S., KIDS FIRST!
KIDS FIRST!® Kid Jurors say - What a beautiful film that addresses a not uncommon issue with our elderly - food insecurity. For elders in our communities with limited income, this has become something that everyone should be aware of.

Milk features a young girl (Charlotte Jaspers) counting her change so she can buy herself a treat at the coffee shop nearby. But when she sees an old man (Frank Edwards) who doesn't have enough money to buy himself milk, she steps in and out of kindness.

The film is beautifully created with outstanding camerawork, beautiful locations and tremendous acting and terrific direction. The little girl's behavior is so charmingly real. You can almost hear her think, thanks to Celia Jasper's direction. The old man is also well played and the shopkeeper (Christy-Anne Sullivan) makes an impactful statement at the end, when she accepts the girls' change without counting it, as enough.

Food insecurity because of lack of money and other resources is such a sad statement of our times, when it really shouldn't exist. I highly recommend this film for ages 8 to 18, plus adults. It would play well at a film festival or special screening and is a conduit for a greater conversation on the topic of food insecurity. Reviewed by Julie S., KIDS FIRST!
Runtime: 5 minutes Juror Recommended Age: 8-18 Suggested Retail Price: $ Media: VIDEO



This title is in the KIDS FIRST! Film Festival - it may not be a regular, endorsed title
MISFIT
MISFIT - STEVE SEGAL
Series: INDIE SHORT, AGES 7-18
Description - A piece of a jigsaw puzzle gets separated from the other members of his puzzle so he attempts to join other puzzles.
KIDS FIRST!® Adult Jurors say - Misfit has appealing animation and an interesting concept. It sparks the imagination in a simple yet charming way.

The story is about a puzzle piece that is separated from its puzzle and tries to find a puzzle to fit in with.

The story is simple, yet effective. It has a nice moral and I like how it was presented. The cinematography is well done; there is nothing outstanding. The setting is definitely unique, though a little vague. It's unclear where the film takes place. The animation has a lot of personality. You can feel the puzzle piece's character in the way it moves. The art direction is creative and engaging. I like the world portrayed in this short.

The message of the film is: there's always a place where you fit in, even when you don't think there is.

I give Misfit 4 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 7 to 18, plus adults. It has an interesting presentation with a unique moral. Reviewed by Calista B., KIDS FIRST! Film Critic
KIDS FIRST!® Kid Jurors say - Misfit has appealing animation and an interesting concept. It sparks the imagination in a simple yet charming way.

The story is about a puzzle piece that is separated from its puzzle and tries to find a puzzle to fit in with.

The story is simple, yet effective. It has a nice moral and I like how it was presented. The cinematography is well done; there is nothing outstanding. The setting is definitely unique, though a little vague. It's unclear where the film takes place. The animation has a lot of personality. You can feel the puzzle piece's character in the way it moves. The art direction is creative and engaging. I like the world portrayed in this short.

The message of the film is: there's always a place where you fit in, even when you don't think there is.

I give Misfit 4 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 7 to 18, plus adults. It has an interesting presentation with a unique moral. Reviewed by Calista B., KIDS FIRST! Film Critic
Runtime: 5 minutes Juror Recommended Age: 7-18 Suggested Retail Price: $ Media: VIDEO



This title is in the KIDS FIRST! Film Festival - it may not be a regular, endorsed title
MOM, ME? I'M MOM?
MOM, ME? I'M MOM? - SANG-CHUL PARK
Series: FOREIGN STUDENT SHORT, AGES 8-14
Description - Insa has a math score of 60 this time. It's Children's Day soon and I'm worried. This is because every year Children's Day mom couldn't spend Children's Day together as a company job. Eventually, the mother learned about her 60-point math test score, and she was told to study math on Children's Day. Insa thinks that if my mom becomes me, she can understand me. Due to the lightning strike in the sky that night, Insa and Mom change, and Mom goes to school and Insa goes to a company.
KIDS FIRST!® Adult Jurors say - Mom, me? I'm mom? Is a delightful short student film that has a message every kid should hear. While watching it I found myself smiling and laughing fairly often. Throughout the film we see the relationship between a mother and her son that I can actually apply to myself and my relationship with my mother.

The story follows a mom (Kim Jisoo) who gets into an argument with her son Insa (Shin Yuchan) about Children's Day. Insa wishes that his mom could understand him and let him enjoy the day off. Little does Insa know that he should be cautious for what he wishes. Insa and his mom take an interesting ride as they experience a day in each other's shoes.

The story line is very simple, but its simplicity is what made me like it so much. This short film is well written and has a progressing story line that builds upon each scene so that everything makes sense. This is very well executed for a student film. The cinematography is good; each shot is framed well and very clear. The locations confused me a tiny bit, since everything was filmed at a school. Given that, the creativity of making places look like an office or a home comes across quite well. Throughout the film there is background music that captures the tone of each scene very well. The one performance that stood out to me was Shin Yuchan's. I found myself laughing during some comedic parts of his performance. Both characters Shin Yuchan plays (as the mom and Insa) are played very well, especially after the switch. It is as if, out of nowhere, he had an old soul and was now a protective, caring mother. Also, the screenwriters deserve very good props. It is very simply written, but has a good moral message.

The message of this film is that, despite how much you think your parents don't understand, they care for you a lot. Make sure that you don't make an assumption without seeing the whole picture.

My favorite part of this film is when the mom goes to school as Insa and meets Insa's teacher and has a very strange but funny laugh, as if she was talking to a friend. That part, as well as most of the film, made me smile.

I give this film 4 out of 5 stars and recommend kit for ages 8 to 14. You should know that the dialogue is in Korean with English subtitles. Reviewed by Hazel A., KIDS FIRST! Film Critic
KIDS FIRST!® Kid Jurors say - Mom, me? I'm mom? Is a delightful short student film that has a message every kid should hear. While watching it I found myself smiling and laughing fairly often. Throughout the film we see the relationship between a mother and her son that I can actually apply to myself and my relationship with my mother.

The story follows a mom (Kim Jisoo) who gets into an argument with her son Insa (Shin Yuchan) about Children's Day. Insa wishes that his mom could understand him and let him enjoy the day off. Little does Insa know that he should be cautious for what he wishes. Insa and his mom take an interesting ride as they experience a day in each other's shoes.

The story line is very simple, but its simplicity is what made me like it so much. This short film is well written and has a progressing story line that builds upon each scene so that everything makes sense. This is very well executed for a student film. The cinematography is good; each shot is framed well and very clear. The locations confused me a tiny bit, since everything was filmed at a school. Given that, the creativity of making places look like an office or a home comes across quite well. Throughout the film there is background music that captures the tone of each scene very well. The one performance that stood out to me was Shin Yuchan's. I found myself laughing during some comedic parts of his performance. Both characters Shin Yuchan plays (as the mom and Insa) are played very well, especially after the switch. It is as if, out of nowhere, he had an old soul and was now a protective, caring mother. Also, the screenwriters deserve very good props. It is very simply written, but has a good moral message.

The message of this film is that, despite how much you think your parents don't understand, they care for you a lot. Make sure that you don't make an assumption without seeing the whole picture.

My favorite part of this film is when the mom goes to school as Insa and meets Insa's teacher and has a very strange but funny laugh, as if she was talking to a friend. That part, as well as most of the film, made me smile.

I give this film 4 out of 5 stars and recommend kit for ages 8 to 14. You should know that the dialogue is in Korean with English subtitles. Reviewed by Hazel A., KIDS FIRST! Film Critic
Runtime: 23 minutes Juror Recommended Age: 8-14 Suggested Retail Price: $ Media: VIDEO



This title is in the KIDS FIRST! Film Festival - it may not be a regular, endorsed title
ZOMBIE FRIEND
ZOMBIE FRIEND - SANG-CHUL PARK
Series: FOREIGN STUDENT SHORT, AGES 8-16
Description - There is no friend who helps Jin-il and Go-bong who are subjected to school violence, and Jung-woo, who was a friend, but everyone turns a blind eye. One day, Ddawang is bullied by Jinil and Gobong and trapped in the bathroom while cleaning up scientific chemicals. And the king turns into a zombie, the children gradually become bitten, and then into a zombie. The plot is that friends and teachers who find out the contents of the zombie notebook found in the library and learn how to cure the problem together.
KIDS FIRST!® Adult Jurors say - Zombie Friend is a funny and entertaining short student-made film with a simple plot and humor. The young actors are charming. While the sound effects and camera work is not much to write home about, this short film makes a coherent story that is great for little kids.

The story follows Jin-il, a student that gets no help when he is bullied at school. After a chemical incident in the bathroom, he turns into a zombie and the school must figure out how to cure him before the entire school turns into zombies.

The story isn't super creative, but it is decently comical. I even laughed a couple times!

The overall camera work is poorly done and many of the shots are choppy. The transitions are pretty arbitrary, but the lighting is pretty good. I like that the film takes advantage of all the locations in the school including classrooms, the library, the hallways and even the bathroom. It shows lots of variety and makes the film a bit more interesting as the students race around the school trying to escape the zombies.

The sound effects are not very good, but they work well enough to drive their purpose across in the story. At times, there is considerable background noise during the audio recording. While the acting is not anything to brad about, the young students' ability carries the storyline well enough. They are definitely enthusiastic and put in a lot of effort. The kids who play zombies are especially impressive with their clumsy zombie walks. My favorite part of the film is all the young actors. They seem to have a lot of fun acting in the film and pretending to be zombies!

This film probably doesn't meet the standards for screening on a big screen, but it is silly and fun. However, I do think that little kids would have a lot of fun watching it.

The message is "never leave anyone behind, and always look out for your friends! You should know that it does contain bloody images. There is blood in the movie, which is obviously fake and not at all gruesome.

I give this film 3 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 6 to 12. It is funny and teaches kids about the value of friendship. The dialogue is in Korean with English subtitles. Reviewed by Abigail L.
KIDS FIRST!® Kid Jurors say - Zombie Friend is a funny and entertaining short student-made film with a simple plot and humor. The young actors are charming. While the sound effects and camera work is not much to write home about, this short film makes a coherent story that is great for little kids.

The story follows Jin-il, a student that gets no help when he is bullied at school. After a chemical incident in the bathroom, he turns into a zombie and the school must figure out how to cure him before the entire school turns into zombies.

The story isn't super creative, but it is decently comical. I even laughed a couple times!

The overall camera work is poorly done and many of the shots are choppy. The transitions are pretty arbitrary, but the lighting is pretty good. I like that the film takes advantage of all the locations in the school including classrooms, the library, the hallways and even the bathroom. It shows lots of variety and makes the film a bit more interesting as the students race around the school trying to escape the zombies.

The sound effects are not very good, but they work well enough to drive their purpose across in the story. At times, there is considerable background noise during the audio recording. While the acting is not anything to brad about, the young students' ability carries the storyline well enough. They are definitely enthusiastic and put in a lot of effort. The kids who play zombies are especially impressive with their clumsy zombie walks. My favorite part of the film is all the young actors. They seem to have a lot of fun acting in the film and pretending to be zombies!

This film probably doesn't meet the standards for screening on a big screen, but it is silly and fun. However, I do think that little kids would have a lot of fun watching it.

The message is "never leave anyone behind, and always look out for your friends! You should know that it does contain bloody images. There is blood in the movie, which is obviously fake and not at all gruesome.

I give this film 3 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 6 to 12. It is funny and teaches kids about the value of friendship. The dialogue is in Korean with English subtitles. Reviewed by Abigail L.
Runtime: 30 minutes Juror Recommended Age: 8-16 Suggested Retail Price: $ Media: VIDEO



This title is in the KIDS FIRST! Film Festival - it may not be a regular, endorsed title
BOY'S JOURNEY: CROSSING THE ALENUIHAHA CHANNEL, A
BOY'S JOURNEY: CROSSING THE ALENUIHAHA CHANNEL, A - DEVERAUX GALLAGHER
Series: INDIE SHORT, AGES 8-18
Description - On August 6, 2020, eleven-year-old Bobo Gallagher became the first person ever to cross the Alenuihaha Channel on a wing and a foil and only the second documented solo crossing of that crossing in history. This is his story.
KIDS FIRST!® Adult Jurors say - A Boy's Journey: Crossing The Alenuihaha Channel is very appealing! Bobo's accomplishment is impressive and stunning. Learning about Bobo's backstory helps you understand his motivation. The location for this solo crossing is beautiful. The statistics about his solo crossing are mind-boggling.

This documentary follows eleven-year-old Bobo as he completes the second ever solo crossing of the Alenuihaha Channel, the most difficult channel in Hawaii. He is also the first ever person to cross it using a wing and foil. This documentary covers Bobo's pre-riding events, interviews with friends, family and experts, as well as footage of his crossing.

The film is detailed, informative and interesting. It includes small suspenseful and exciting moments that enhance its main plot and captured my attention. Its only shortcoming is that sometimes it gets a bit repetitive. I love how they include the history of native Hawaiians in crossing this channel. That puts things into perspective.

The cinematography is terrific. I especially enjoyed the beautiful images of the island and the channel; they took my breath away. The only times when the cinematography doesn't quite hold up are some from the ship because parts of the boat block the shot.

However, the locations are so breathtakingly beautiful that it doesn't detract from it very much. The background music and sounds add a lot to the film. Bobo is main star of this documentary, but we meet his family, friends and others that were involved in helping him fulfill his goal. The director, Deveraux Gallagher, had a big influence in how we get to watch Bobo's adventure. You appreciate Bobo's impressive accomplishment more by learning about the history of the channel and how challenging it is. I was fascinated learning how the wing and foil work as I watched Bobo successfully using them. Watching his crossing is totally exhilarating! I felt as if I was flying alongside him. Bobo definitely inspired me to pursue my own dreams and be more confident. He has such a great personality and is so talented.

The message of this film is to believe in yourself and do what you love to do. It shows a young boy undertaking a risky challenge, but taking appropriate precautions to do it, including the help of adults and professionals.

I give this film 4 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 8 to 18, plus adults. It is inspirational, encouraging, and entertaining. This is a perfect film for a youth or family film festival. It takes place in Hawaii and would definitely appeal to those engaged in water sports. Reviewed by Kyla C. and Julie S., KIDS FIRST!
KIDS FIRST!® Kid Jurors say - A Boy's Journey: Crossing The Alenuihaha Channel is very appealing! Bobo's accomplishment is impressive and stunning. Learning about Bobo's backstory helps you understand his motivation. The location for this solo crossing is beautiful. The statistics about his solo crossing are mind-boggling.

This documentary follows eleven-year-old Bobo as he completes the second ever solo crossing of the Alenuihaha Channel, the most difficult channel in Hawaii. He is also the first ever person to cross it using a wing and foil. This documentary covers Bobo's pre-riding events, interviews with friends, family and experts, as well as footage of his crossing.

The film is detailed, informative and interesting. It includes small suspenseful and exciting moments that enhance its main plot and captured my attention. Its only shortcoming is that sometimes it gets a bit repetitive. I love how they include the history of native Hawaiians in crossing this channel. That puts things into perspective.

The cinematography is terrific. I especially enjoyed the beautiful images of the island and the channel; they took my breath away. The only times when the cinematography doesn't quite hold up are some from the ship because parts of the boat block the shot.

However, the locations are so breathtakingly beautiful that it doesn't detract from it very much. The background music and sounds add a lot to the film. Bobo is main star of this documentary, but we meet his family, friends and others that were involved in helping him fulfill his goal. The director, Deveraux Gallagher, had a big influence in how we get to watch Bobo's adventure. You appreciate Bobo's impressive accomplishment more by learning about the history of the channel and how challenging it is. I was fascinated learning how the wing and foil work as I watched Bobo successfully using them. Watching his crossing is totally exhilarating! I felt as if I was flying alongside him. Bobo definitely inspired me to pursue my own dreams and be more confident. He has such a great personality and is so talented.

The message of this film is to believe in yourself and do what you love to do. It shows a young boy undertaking a risky challenge, but taking appropriate precautions to do it, including the help of adults and professionals.

I give this film 4 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 8 to 18, plus adults. It is inspirational, encouraging, and entertaining. This is a perfect film for a youth or family film festival. It takes place in Hawaii and would definitely appeal to those engaged in water sports. Reviewed by Kyla C. and Julie S., KIDS FIRST!
Runtime: 38 minutes Juror Recommended Age: 8-18 Suggested Retail Price: $ Media: VIDEO



This title is in the KIDS FIRST! Film Festival - it may not be a regular, endorsed title
MASK, THE
MASK, THE - SABA GHASEMI
Series: INDIE SHORT, AGES 10-18
Description - I don't think that adults can see correctly behind their masks
KIDS FIRST!® Adult Jurors say - The Mask is very immersive and relatable to our current society.

The story follows a young girl who is forced to witness her parents arguing in the midst of the pandemic.

This story is about something that practically every person experienced this year. This film is from Iran and the dialogue is in Persian with English subtitles. It's uniquely personal and interesting to see how a family's experience in Iran is so similar to what we have experienced in the USA. The camera is almost always focused on the girl, thus showing everything from her perspective, which I like, given the story. The acting is good, although the characters are not particularly compelling. It is well produced with good video and audio, and subtitles see quite accurate. What it does point out is how in this time of crisis, these adults don't seem to notice the feelings of those around them - particularly their young child. They are so absorbed with their own stuff that their child's feelings and how she is handling the pandemic are not recognized by them. The symbolism and imagery with the concept of the masks, both physically and metaphorically hit a chord.

The message of the film is for parents to be more aware, don't take your children's feeling lightly.

I give this film 4 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 10 to 18. Reviewed by Calista B. and Julie S., ,KIDS FIRST!
KIDS FIRST!® Kid Jurors say - The Mask is very immersive and relatable to our current society.

The story follows a young girl who is forced to witness her parents arguing in the midst of the pandemic.

This story is about something that practically every person experienced this year. This film is from Iran and the dialogue is in Persian with English subtitles. It's uniquely personal and interesting to see how a family's experience in Iran is so similar to what we have experienced in the USA. The camera is almost always focused on the girl, thus showing everything from her perspective, which I like, given the story. The acting is good, although the characters are not particularly compelling. It is well produced with good video and audio, and subtitles see quite accurate. What it does point out is how in this time of crisis, these adults don't seem to notice the feelings of those around them - particularly their young child. They are so absorbed with their own stuff that their child's feelings and how she is handling the pandemic are not recognized by them. The symbolism and imagery with the concept of the masks, both physically and metaphorically hit a chord.

The message of the film is for parents to be more aware, don't take your children's feeling lightly.

I give this film 4 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 10 to 18. Reviewed by Calista B. and Julie S., ,KIDS FIRST!
Runtime: 5 minutes Juror Recommended Age: 10-18 Suggested Retail Price: $ Media: VIDEO



This title is in the KIDS FIRST! Film Festival - it may not be a regular, endorsed title
GREAT WHITE SHARKS
GREAT WHITE SHARKS - LAKAN DUSKIN
Series: INDIE SHORT, AGES 5-18
Description - no synopsis given
KIDS FIRST!® Adult Jurors say - As an extreme shark lover, I truly appreciate the work that went into creating this LEGO-animated film. The filming is impeccable and the message is one that everyone needs to hear. My hat's off to ten-year-old filmmaker Lakan Duskin for creating such a terrific film.

Great White Sharks documents the life of a great white shark from birth to its death, which we discover is not usually due to natural causes. This film sheds light on the horrors of the true victims, the sharks themselves.

Stop motion is one of my all-time favorite types of films. There are no mistakes in the flow and natural motion of the LEGO-animated great white shark. It is impressive how well the sharks and other animals move about throughout the scenes, almost effortlessly. For a student film, this is extraordinarily well made. It does have rather an abrupt start, which I had to go back and listen to a second time to see if I missed something. Also, it is narrated by a child, presumably the filmmaker, and the narration is a bit rough. The shark finning scene perfectly represents how it is done in real life. The blue ocean LEGO blocks make a perfectly, imperfect ocean, one that resembles the actual ocean. The music fits most scenes. When there is comedy, there is comical music; when there is sorrow, there is sad music. However, the music cuts off rather awkwardly in the scene transitions. I love the shark trivia as well as the black background still scenes that offer interesting facts about sharks.

The message of this film suggests that, even though these predators of the ocean are stereotyped and categorized as mean and vicious, we learn that humans are more a danger to them, than they are to us. Many people would enjoy and learn many new things about sharks from this film and it would change their perception on these beautiful creatures.

I give this film 3.5 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 6 to 18, plus adults. It is made by a ten-year old, with help from his mama. It shares a very important message that the whole family may find particularly interesting. This would make a wonderful addition to a student film festival. Reviewed by Ashleigh C. and Julie S., KIDS FIRST!
KIDS FIRST!® Kid Jurors say - As an extreme shark lover, I truly appreciate the work that went into creating this LEGO-animated film. The filming is impeccable and the message is one that everyone needs to hear. My hat's off to ten-year-old filmmaker Lakan Duskin for creating such a terrific film.

Great White Sharks documents the life of a great white shark from birth to its death, which we discover is not usually due to natural causes. This film sheds light on the horrors of the true victims, the sharks themselves.

Stop motion is one of my all-time favorite types of films. There are no mistakes in the flow and natural motion of the LEGO-animated great white shark. It is impressive how well the sharks and other animals move about throughout the scenes, almost effortlessly. For a student film, this is extraordinarily well made. It does have rather an abrupt start, which I had to go back and listen to a second time to see if I missed something. Also, it is narrated by a child, presumably the filmmaker, and the narration is a bit rough. The shark finning scene perfectly represents how it is done in real life. The blue ocean LEGO blocks make a perfectly, imperfect ocean, one that resembles the actual ocean. The music fits most scenes. When there is comedy, there is comical music; when there is sorrow, there is sad music. However, the music cuts off rather awkwardly in the scene transitions. I love the shark trivia as well as the black background still scenes that offer interesting facts about sharks.

The message of this film suggests that, even though these predators of the ocean are stereotyped and categorized as mean and vicious, we learn that humans are more a danger to them, than they are to us. Many people would enjoy and learn many new things about sharks from this film and it would change their perception on these beautiful creatures.

I give this film 3.5 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 6 to 18, plus adults. It is made by a ten-year old, with help from his mama. It shares a very important message that the whole family may find particularly interesting. This would make a wonderful addition to a student film festival. Reviewed by Ashleigh C. and Julie S., KIDS FIRST!
Runtime: 3 minutes Juror Recommended Age: 5-18 Suggested Retail Price: $ Media: VIDEO



This title is in the KIDS FIRST! Film Festival - it may not be a regular, endorsed title
2020 KID, THE
2020 KID, THE - DANIEL LUCCA PARENTI
Series: INDIE SHORT, AGES 6-18
Description - Lockdown from a kids perspective. Oakland, California. Take yourself back to Fall of 2020. The Covid-19 Pandemic is raging on... Lockdown is in place... All activities cancelled... Work is from home... School is from home... And you are 12 years old. No School, No Sports, No Friends. Just You, Your family, and Your Computer stuck at home for the last six months.
KIDS FIRST!® Adult Jurors say - The story in The 2020 Kid is very real and relatable. Most kids can understand Luca, the protagonist in the film. He is stuck inside his home during the 2020 COVID pandemic and has trouble focusing on school, must do chores and spends a lot of tine alone. He misses his friends and his parents are busy with work. Any child in the USA, and actually in the world, can relate to his sadness and loneliness.

The storyline follows a day in the life of a young boy living through the COVID-19 pandemic. Each day is exactly the same. His parents don't have time for him due to their work and he is stuck, unable to engage in school or with his friends. He tries to distract himself with video games, but that does not make him happy. In the end, he finds a way to lift his spirits.

The story line is so true to the experience of kids this past year and has many emotional moments. While I felt the emotions of the main character and could see his day in the life, the film takes a while to draw you in. The film starts off with terrific scenes, well lit and interesting angles that show the boy in his home. The close ups help capture the boy's emotions. The montages in the middle of the story are very cool. The home is in Oakland, California in a beautiful green neighborhood that feels as if it could be anywhere in America. The music is excellent and helps drive the film's emotions in every way. It starts with a reminder of where the film takes place. The music in the middle, during the montage, includes a song written by the main character and includes a group performance, which he deeply misses. The music in the final scene is hopeful.

The story was written and directed by the protagonist's dad. The actors are the actual family of which the film is based. They act very naturally. The film's creator produced, directed, wrote, edited and performed in the entire thing. Of note is that the entire film was shot on his I-Phone. I love how he creates various moods throughout the film and I particularly like the video montages during the middle of the film. My favorite part of the film is the music.

The impact of the COVID pandemic and quarantine was extra hard for kids who were forced to go attend school from home and were isolated from their friends.

I give The 2020 Kid 4 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 6 to 18, plus adults. I think everyone can relate to this movie and it is something that people in the future can refer to as it shows how difficult the pandemic lockdowns were for kids and their families. My only concern is to make sure that the filmmaker owns the rights to all of the music in the film.

Reviewed by Nyara A. and Julie S., KIDS FIRST!
KIDS FIRST!® Kid Jurors say - The story in The 2020 Kid is very real and relatable. Most kids can understand Luca, the protagonist in the film. He is stuck inside his home during the 2020 COVID pandemic and has trouble focusing on school, must do chores and spends a lot of tine alone. He misses his friends and his parents are busy with work. Any child in the USA, and actually in the world, can relate to his sadness and loneliness.

The storyline follows a day in the life of a young boy living through the COVID-19 pandemic. Each day is exactly the same. His parents don't have time for him due to their work and he is stuck, unable to engage in school or with his friends. He tries to distract himself with video games, but that does not make him happy. In the end, he finds a way to lift his spirits.

The story line is so true to the experience of kids this past year and has many emotional moments. While I felt the emotions of the main character and could see his day in the life, the film takes a while to draw you in. The film starts off with terrific scenes, well lit and interesting angles that show the boy in his home. The close ups help capture the boy's emotions. The montages in the middle of the story are very cool. The home is in Oakland, California in a beautiful green neighborhood that feels as if it could be anywhere in America. The music is excellent and helps drive the film's emotions in every way. It starts with a reminder of where the film takes place. The music in the middle, during the montage, includes a song written by the main character and includes a group performance, which he deeply misses. The music in the final scene is hopeful.

The story was written and directed by the protagonist's dad. The actors are the actual family of which the film is based. They act very naturally. The film's creator produced, directed, wrote, edited and performed in the entire thing. Of note is that the entire film was shot on his I-Phone. I love how he creates various moods throughout the film and I particularly like the video montages during the middle of the film. My favorite part of the film is the music.

The impact of the COVID pandemic and quarantine was extra hard for kids who were forced to go attend school from home and were isolated from their friends.

I give The 2020 Kid 4 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 6 to 18, plus adults. I think everyone can relate to this movie and it is something that people in the future can refer to as it shows how difficult the pandemic lockdowns were for kids and their families. My only concern is to make sure that the filmmaker owns the rights to all of the music in the film.

Reviewed by Nyara A. and Julie S., KIDS FIRST!
Runtime: 30 minutes Juror Recommended Age: 6-18 Suggested Retail Price: $ Media: VIDEO



This title is in the KIDS FIRST! Film Festival - it may not be a regular, endorsed title
TALKING ABOUT ALOPECIA
TALKING ABOUT ALOPECIA - LYDIA HIBBERT
Series: FOREIGN SHORT, AGES 6-18
Description - Children from around the UK talk about their experiences living with Alopecia. An insightful and touching film crafted during lockdown featuring artwork and stories from children supported by the 'Alopecia UK' & 'Young Animators Club'.
KIDS FIRST!® Adult Jurors say - I like that Talking about Alopecia has kids that have Alopecia talking about it rather than listening to a parent or a doctor talk about it. That makes it real kids for kids, whether they have it or not. I love brave they were to talk about it and answer questions about what upsets them that are typical of what people ask. We also learn how to treat people with alopecia. The video is well made with good questions and excellent animation.

The film features a group of kids from the UK on a call talking about their Alopecia, saying what it is and how people with alopecia should be treated.

I like that the kids speak for themselves and talk honestly about their experience with the disorder. The film is animated so whoever is speaking has an animated box with their name come up so you have an idea of what they look like. I like how they used a zoom-type set up for the animation boxes. The music in the background is happy and light, which goes with this video, because they should not be sad or ashamed of their disorder and the light music helps support that atmosphere. Lydia Hibbert directs the film and is to be commended for the simplicity of the format. The questions are structured so that they never make the kids uncomfortable. The kids that speak are very brave for being okay with talking about their situations. I never knew what this disorder was before, so I learned it is the condition that causes hair to fall out in small patches. I also learned that the disorder is caused by the white blood cells attacking the hair follicles.

The message is to not treat people with alopecia any different than others. It is good to expose kids to various disorders and teach them how to treat people at a young age.

I give Talking About Alopecia 4 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 6 to 18, plus adults. This would play well at a youth or family film festival because it addresses issues that goes beyond the disorder itself, it teaches the viewers to treat people who are different with kindness and understanding. Reviewed by Lorelei T., KIDS FIRST!
KIDS FIRST!® Kid Jurors say - I like that Talking about Alopecia has kids that have Alopecia talking about it rather than listening to a parent or a doctor talk about it. That makes it real kids for kids, whether they have it or not. I love brave they were to talk about it and answer questions about what upsets them that are typical of what people ask. We also learn how to treat people with alopecia. The video is well made with good questions and excellent animation.

The film features a group of kids from the UK on a call talking about their Alopecia, saying what it is and how people with alopecia should be treated.

I like that the kids speak for themselves and talk honestly about their experience with the disorder. The film is animated so whoever is speaking has an animated box with their name come up so you have an idea of what they look like. I like how they used a zoom-type set up for the animation boxes. The music in the background is happy and light, which goes with this video, because they should not be sad or ashamed of their disorder and the light music helps support that atmosphere. Lydia Hibbert directs the film and is to be commended for the simplicity of the format. The questions are structured so that they never make the kids uncomfortable. The kids that speak are very brave for being okay with talking about their situations. I never knew what this disorder was before, so I learned it is the condition that causes hair to fall out in small patches. I also learned that the disorder is caused by the white blood cells attacking the hair follicles.

The message is to not treat people with alopecia any different than others. It is good to expose kids to various disorders and teach them how to treat people at a young age.

I give Talking About Alopecia 4 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 6 to 18, plus adults. This would play well at a youth or family film festival because it addresses issues that goes beyond the disorder itself, it teaches the viewers to treat people who are different with kindness and understanding. Reviewed by Lorelei T., KIDS FIRST!
Runtime: 8 minutes Juror Recommended Age: 6-18 Suggested Retail Price: $ Media: VIDEO



This title is in the KIDS FIRST! Film Festival - it may not be a regular, endorsed title
PAPER GOD
PAPER GOD - DANIYAL MAHMOUDNIA
Series: FOREIGN SHORT, AGES 6-18
Description - Ali, who is disabled and in a wheelchair, aspires to go to the top of a cliff from which he can launch his paper plane like the other boys..
KIDS FIRST!® Adult Jurors say - Paper God has a unique presentation and symbolism. The story is all about seemingly unachievable goals, and I like the usage of a cliff for this metaphor. I found it to quite intriguing.

The story is about a disabled boy who desires to reach the top of a cliff so he can throw a paper plane from there like the other boys.

This short film is interesting, although a big vague in some ways. We don't know the backstory of the boys, or the relationship between them, but that doesn't necessarily detract from the film. The camerawork is pretty simple, but effective. The scene where the boys climb the cliff is quite dynamic and is undoubtedly the best scene in terms of the camerawork. Also, in terms of character development, when you see the older boy carry his crippled friend up the hill, sometimes on all fours - it shows a tenderness between them that almost brings you to tears. That is an incredible scene. There is some background music and natural sounds of birds or insects, all of which make it seem real. The acting is quite good; both boys seem like normal kids, although one is physically handicapped. The final scene where we see a scattering of paper airplanes and the wheelchair slowly comes into view strikes you as you see how, in spite of being wheelchair bound, the boy was able to realize his dream.

The message is that you can achieve anything with the support of others. I really enjoyed the symbolism and the intriguing imagery. Dealing with the cliff and the paper planes symbolize achievement.

I give Paper God 4 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 6 to 18, plus adults. This film is inspiring, especially to those with seemingly impossible dreams. Reviewed by Calista B. and Julie S., KIDS FIRST!
KIDS FIRST!® Kid Jurors say - Paper God has a unique presentation and symbolism. The story is all about seemingly unachievable goals, and I like the usage of a cliff for this metaphor. I found it to quite intriguing.

The story is about a disabled boy who desires to reach the top of a cliff so he can throw a paper plane from there like the other boys.

This short film is interesting, although a big vague in some ways. We don't know the backstory of the boys, or the relationship between them, but that doesn't necessarily detract from the film. The camerawork is pretty simple, but effective. The scene where the boys climb the cliff is quite dynamic and is undoubtedly the best scene in terms of the camerawork. Also, in terms of character development, when you see the older boy carry his crippled friend up the hill, sometimes on all fours - it shows a tenderness between them that almost brings you to tears. That is an incredible scene. There is some background music and natural sounds of birds or insects, all of which make it seem real. The acting is quite good; both boys seem like normal kids, although one is physically handicapped. The final scene where we see a scattering of paper airplanes and the wheelchair slowly comes into view strikes you as you see how, in spite of being wheelchair bound, the boy was able to realize his dream.

The message is that you can achieve anything with the support of others. I really enjoyed the symbolism and the intriguing imagery. Dealing with the cliff and the paper planes symbolize achievement.

I give Paper God 4 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 6 to 18, plus adults. This film is inspiring, especially to those with seemingly impossible dreams. Reviewed by Calista B. and Julie S., KIDS FIRST!
Runtime: 10 minutes Juror Recommended Age: 6-18 Suggested Retail Price: $ Media: VIDEO



This title is in the KIDS FIRST! Film Festival - it may not be a regular, endorsed title
SNOWY HEART
SNOWY HEART - ALIREZA BIGLARI
Series: INDEPENDENT SHORT, AGES 3-18
Description - When a child saves the frozen world with love, love can save the world.
KIDS FIRST!® Adult Jurors say - Snowy Heart is a creative, joyous short film about a snowman coming to life. It is unique and heartwarming, as well as being generally cute and entertaining.

The story line begins with a young girl drawing a snowman. We see her react as her snowman waves and blinks on the paper. Then, she looks outside to see that her drawing has come to life right outside her window!

The story is quite simple, has a nice flow and is very positive and uplifting. It is only three minute long, and is well written and delivers a cheerful winter theme.

The visuals are well done. There are a limited number of shots, of course. Only so much that can happen in such a short film. It is a combination of a live action and animation. The girl, her room and the house are all live action, but the snowman on the paper and the snowman outside are all animated. This is creative and definitely adds a lot to the film. This combination is one of the best parts of this film, especially since the snowman animation is colorfully detailed and amazingly cute. The locations match the story perfectly - the girl's room and the front yard. The window looking out at the snow and showing the audience how beautiful the yard looks is a great touch. It adds a lot of happiness to see such pretty shots. I really like the heartbeat sound that accompanies the snowman coming to life. It adds a very human element to the movie. Dina Noroozi plays the girl in this film and she is perfect. My favorite part of the film is the live action and animation mix. It makes it more believable and spiritual.

The message of this film is to be happy and believe in the winter and holiday spirit!

I give this film 4 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 3 to 18, plus adults. This is a joyous, heartwarming film great for winter! Young kids will love it, especially! Reviewed by Kyla C. and Julie S., KIDS FIRST!
KIDS FIRST!® Kid Jurors say - Snowy Heart is a creative, joyous short film about a snowman coming to life. It is unique and heartwarming, as well as being generally cute and entertaining.

The story line begins with a young girl drawing a snowman. We see her react as her snowman waves and blinks on the paper. Then, she looks outside to see that her drawing has come to life right outside her window!

The story is quite simple, has a nice flow and is very positive and uplifting. It is only three minute long, and is well written and delivers a cheerful winter theme.

The visuals are well done. There are a limited number of shots, of course. Only so much that can happen in such a short film. It is a combination of a live action and animation. The girl, her room and the house are all live action, but the snowman on the paper and the snowman outside are all animated. This is creative and definitely adds a lot to the film. This combination is one of the best parts of this film, especially since the snowman animation is colorfully detailed and amazingly cute. The locations match the story perfectly - the girl's room and the front yard. The window looking out at the snow and showing the audience how beautiful the yard looks is a great touch. It adds a lot of happiness to see such pretty shots. I really like the heartbeat sound that accompanies the snowman coming to life. It adds a very human element to the movie. Dina Noroozi plays the girl in this film and she is perfect. My favorite part of the film is the live action and animation mix. It makes it more believable and spiritual.

The message of this film is to be happy and believe in the winter and holiday spirit!

I give this film 4 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 3 to 18, plus adults. This is a joyous, heartwarming film great for winter! Young kids will love it, especially! Reviewed by Kyla C. and Julie S., KIDS FIRST!
Runtime: 3 minutes Juror Recommended Age: 3-18 Suggested Retail Price: $ Media: VIDEO



This title is in the KIDS FIRST! Film Festival - it may not be a regular, endorsed title
LEGEND OF SANTA, THE
LEGEND OF SANTA, THE - ANDREW DE BURGH
Series: INDIE SHORT, AGES 5 -18
Description - When a compassionate bishop sees that his woodcarving hobby has the ability to brighten a poor girl's life, he sets out on a journey to see that children everywhere have the same opportunity.
KIDS FIRST!® Adult Jurors say - The Legend of Santa is a heartwarming animated short film based on the book "A Magical Christmas Adventure." It's colorful, fun and great for the holiday season!

The storyline describes just how Santa came to be. It starts with just a man giving a doll to a small girl and shows how as the years pass, the Santa we know today begins to take shape. The final version of Santa shows him in his traditional red coat getting onto his sleigh with the reindeer, while the elves load up the gifts. It is a creative take on the Santa legend and is interesting to watch the interpretation of each of Santa's stages before turning into the jolly character children enjoy today.

Although the film is only about six minutes, the story stretches over a long period of time beginning in the year 330 AD in what is now Turkey. It is creative but a bit confusing at times. There is no dialogue, but it's fairly clear what is going on. The animation is developed from drawings and they are subtly colored, in muted tones. We see gifts that look like Russian stacking dolls. We see the passage of time in an hour glass. We see a gentleman secretly delivering packages to children and riding in a horse drawn cart through the snow. Footsteps take him to many places. It is all presented as almost a dream, a cherished dream at that. There is a beautiful background of instrumental music that begins slow and picks up speed as the plot develops. The music, by Marc Timon, definitely enhances the film a great deal, drawing the audience along from scene to scene, century to century. This is definitely one of the high points of the film.

The message of this film is to never lose hope and to spread joy.

I give this film 4 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 5 to 18, plus adults. The artistry can be enjoyed by children of multiple ages. This film tells a heartwarming, family-friendly Christmas story and would play well at holiday time in any film festival. Reviewed by Kyla C. and Julie S., KIDS FIRST!
KIDS FIRST!® Kid Jurors say - The Legend of Santa is a heartwarming animated short film based on the book "A Magical Christmas Adventure." It's colorful, fun and great for the holiday season!

The storyline describes just how Santa came to be. It starts with just a man giving a doll to a small girl and shows how as the years pass, the Santa we know today begins to take shape. The final version of Santa shows him in his traditional red coat getting onto his sleigh with the reindeer, while the elves load up the gifts. It is a creative take on the Santa legend and is interesting to watch the interpretation of each of Santa's stages before turning into the jolly character children enjoy today.

Although the film is only about six minutes, the story stretches over a long period of time beginning in the year 330 AD in what is now Turkey. It is creative but a bit confusing at times. There is no dialogue, but it's fairly clear what is going on. The animation is developed from drawings and they are subtly colored, in muted tones. We see gifts that look like Russian stacking dolls. We see the passage of time in an hour glass. We see a gentleman secretly delivering packages to children and riding in a horse drawn cart through the snow. Footsteps take him to many places. It is all presented as almost a dream, a cherished dream at that. There is a beautiful background of instrumental music that begins slow and picks up speed as the plot develops. The music, by Marc Timon, definitely enhances the film a great deal, drawing the audience along from scene to scene, century to century. This is definitely one of the high points of the film.

The message of this film is to never lose hope and to spread joy.

I give this film 4 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 5 to 18, plus adults. The artistry can be enjoyed by children of multiple ages. This film tells a heartwarming, family-friendly Christmas story and would play well at holiday time in any film festival. Reviewed by Kyla C. and Julie S., KIDS FIRST!
Runtime: 6 minutes Juror Recommended Age: 5-18 Suggested Retail Price: $ Media: VIDEO



This title is in the KIDS FIRST! Film Festival - it may not be a regular, endorsed title
SPACE BEARS - THE MOVIE
SPACE BEARS - THE MOVIE - MIKE SCHLEIF
Series: INDIE SHORT, AGES 4-12
Description - Becca and Zoe help their newest friend Sam save the galaxy from a mean King.
KIDS FIRST!® Adult Jurors say - Space Bears - the Movie is a short animated film with a wonderful message of friendship. The plot is well thought out and engaging. The music is upbeat and the different planets are interesting and fun. The characters all have different personalities and talents which make them a great team.

Elder Bear narrates a story about greedy King Glopp who has a scepter with a gem that holds powers that he is using to try to take over all the planets. The only thing that can stop him is the friendship gem which he breaks into pieces. Space Bear Sam teams up with Zoe, Becca and others to try find the pieces and defeat him.

I like the main characters in the story - the evil king who wants take over the galaxy, Sam the hero who wants to defeat him. The friendship gem keeps getting destroyed which makes it interesting since that's the only way they can defeat the evil king. I also like how everyone has a special talent and they contribute to stopping King Glop. The theme of friendship is seen throughout the story.

The 2D animation is very detailed, once you get beyond the opening 3 minutes - which is composed of non-animated images as Elder Bear gives the background of the story. I was concerned that the entire film would be like this, but fortunately it is not. After you get past the opening 3 minutes, it has full range animation with bright colors, interesting characters and cool backgrounds. The planets have a lot of detail and are named to fit the environment of each one. The characters are imaginative, as is their attire. Sam's hero suit has lots of details with many gadgets that he uses to do lots of stuff. The backgrounds change throughout the story several times as the characters travel to different planets, including the one where King Glop rules. I like how the planets' environments match their names and King Glop's planet looks gloomy, which sets the mood there. The music is upbeat and optimistic music when Sam enters and when the space bear team appears. The show is directed by Mike Shleif and written by Mike and Madison Shleif. Kudos to them for creating an excellent script with lots of child-appropriate humor. The plot is interesting and the characters are very enjoyable to watch. The message is a really good one for young children. I particularly enjoyed Erika the Robot. She is humorous because she never understood sarcasm and takes things too literally. All the voice actors are to be commended for their performances.

The message of the show is that friendship and teamwork can help you triumph over difficult obstacles and get you through difficult situations.

I give Space Bears - The Movie 5 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 4 to 12. Reviewed by Carlee S. and Julie S., KIDS FIRST!
KIDS FIRST!® Kid Jurors say - Space Bears - the Movie is a short animated film with a wonderful message of friendship. The plot is well thought out and engaging. The music is upbeat and the different planets are interesting and fun. The characters all have different personalities and talents which make them a great team.

Elder Bear narrates a story about greedy King Glopp who has a scepter with a gem that holds powers that he is using to try to take over all the planets. The only thing that can stop him is the friendship gem which he breaks into pieces. Space Bear Sam teams up with Zoe, Becca and others to try find the pieces and defeat him.

I like the main characters in the story - the evil king who wants take over the galaxy, Sam the hero who wants to defeat him. The friendship gem keeps getting destroyed which makes it interesting since that's the only way they can defeat the evil king. I also like how everyone has a special talent and they contribute to stopping King Glop. The theme of friendship is seen throughout the story.

The 2D animation is very detailed, once you get beyond the opening 3 minutes - which is composed of non-animated images as Elder Bear gives the background of the story. I was concerned that the entire film would be like this, but fortunately it is not. After you get past the opening 3 minutes, it has full range animation with bright colors, interesting characters and cool backgrounds. The planets have a lot of detail and are named to fit the environment of each one. The characters are imaginative, as is their attire. Sam's hero suit has lots of details with many gadgets that he uses to do lots of stuff. The backgrounds change throughout the story several times as the characters travel to different planets, including the one where King Glop rules. I like how the planets' environments match their names and King Glop's planet looks gloomy, which sets the mood there. The music is upbeat and optimistic music when Sam enters and when the space bear team appears. The show is directed by Mike Shleif and written by Mike and Madison Shleif. Kudos to them for creating an excellent script with lots of child-appropriate humor. The plot is interesting and the characters are very enjoyable to watch. The message is a really good one for young children. I particularly enjoyed Erika the Robot. She is humorous because she never understood sarcasm and takes things too literally. All the voice actors are to be commended for their performances.

The message of the show is that friendship and teamwork can help you triumph over difficult obstacles and get you through difficult situations.

I give Space Bears - The Movie 5 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 4 to 12. Reviewed by Carlee S. and Julie S., KIDS FIRST!
Runtime: 37 minutes Juror Recommended Age: 4-12 Suggested Retail Price: $ Media: VIDEO



This title is in the KIDS FIRST! Film Festival - it may not be a regular, endorsed title
HOPE
HOPE - ABDULLA AL JANAHI
Series: FOREIGN ANIMATED SHORT, AGES 4-18
Description - The short film "HOPE" is about the journey of a new born baby sea turtle named Aqua. During his journey, he faces many obstacles from human pollution to different predators. Using his mind and courage he over comes one obstacle after the other, until he reaches his final destination. Just before he enters the sea, he witnesses a life changing scene, that he bravely over comes and grows as a character.
KIDS FIRST!® Adult Jurors say - I love the short animated film Hope, because it shows the effects of human ignorance when people litter and how littering causes animals to die.

The storyline follows a turtle that has just hatched and is trying to avoid predators to get to the water. He sees other animals die at the hands of predators.

I love how cute the main turtle is and how his facial expressions show his emotions. I love seeing the turtle's mini adventure from birth to getting into the ocean for the first time; it shows how hard it is for the turtles to survive. It shows hope because the turtle keeps fighting to get to the water and how he tries to help the other turtle when he doesn't think it will make it. The turtles are so darn cute. They look so innocent to show the true effects of humans littering and how the animals are innocent.

The animation is really terrific. It is well detailed and represents turtles quite well. I like how it shows the world from a turtle's point of view. The water and moon light up the whole scene, giving it a hopeful glow. The music is exquisite, lending dramatic touches that fit the storyline. As the turtle keeps running into issues and you never know if he is about to die or not, the music helps build suspension and nuances. The animators are to be commended for their excellent work. I love how the turtle's movements mimic the way that actual turtles move. My favorite part is when the turtle finally gets to the water because it shows freedom for the turtle and he is so exuberantly happy. This would look great on the big screen.

The message of this short film is to always have hope.

I give Hope 4.5 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 4 to 18, plus adults. It teaches a good lesson about not littering and qualifies as an environmental topic because it shows the food chain with the predators trying to eat the turtle as well as the effects of littering on the environment. Reviewed by Lorelei T., KIDS FIRST!
KIDS FIRST!® Kid Jurors say - I love the short animated film Hope, because it shows the effects of human ignorance when people litter and how littering causes animals to die.

The storyline follows a turtle that has just hatched and is trying to avoid predators to get to the water. He sees other animals die at the hands of predators.

I love how cute the main turtle is and how his facial expressions show his emotions. I love seeing the turtle's mini adventure from birth to getting into the ocean for the first time; it shows how hard it is for the turtles to survive. It shows hope because the turtle keeps fighting to get to the water and how he tries to help the other turtle when he doesn't think it will make it. The turtles are so darn cute. They look so innocent to show the true effects of humans littering and how the animals are innocent.

The animation is really terrific. It is well detailed and represents turtles quite well. I like how it shows the world from a turtle's point of view. The water and moon light up the whole scene, giving it a hopeful glow. The music is exquisite, lending dramatic touches that fit the storyline. As the turtle keeps running into issues and you never know if he is about to die or not, the music helps build suspension and nuances. The animators are to be commended for their excellent work. I love how the turtle's movements mimic the way that actual turtles move. My favorite part is when the turtle finally gets to the water because it shows freedom for the turtle and he is so exuberantly happy. This would look great on the big screen.

The message of this short film is to always have hope.

I give Hope 4.5 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 4 to 18, plus adults. It teaches a good lesson about not littering and qualifies as an environmental topic because it shows the food chain with the predators trying to eat the turtle as well as the effects of littering on the environment. Reviewed by Lorelei T., KIDS FIRST!
Runtime: 9 minutes Juror Recommended Age: 4-18 Suggested Retail Price: $ Media: VIDEO



This title is in the KIDS FIRST! Film Festival - it may not be a regular, endorsed title
THERE IS ENOUGH FOR EVERYBODY!
THERE IS ENOUGH FOR EVERYBODY! - JINOS AKHTARKHAVARI
Series: ENVIRONMENTAL SHORT, AGES 7-18
Description - A 6-year-old boy, Alvand, is concerned about his best friend's health (Elena), when he finds out that unhealthy food is being produced in Elena's parents' factory and he cannot do anything about it, he solves his problem in his own way.
KIDS FIRST!® Adult Jurors say - The film puts out an interesting question about what qualifies as healthy food. It's well presented and leaves it up to the viewer to make up their own mind.

The storyline follows three young children at a play date. All is fun and happy until the mom brings out a platter of snacks. One little boy claims that the snacks aren't healthy and the mom shrugs him off, saying, "maybe it's more polite to eat whatever people offer us." The question is to decipher whether food is healthy or not. The boy questions whether the snacks served are nutritious or not. One person claims that the snacks aren't healthy; another says it is healthy enough and there's enough food to go around. It makes one question whether or not the snacks served were healthy or not. If not, why did the mom serve it. The film ends with a statement about how chemicals in food shape our DNA, followed by a message on screen saying, "There's enough for everyone." Are we serving our children unhealthy food?

The production work is quite satisfactory. My favorite camera shots are those of the children playing, without dialogue. The montages of the children playing in the bright afternoon and the light shining down on them are lovely. The soft, calming background music drives the non-narrative scenes, creating a calm atmosphere to the topic of this film, which is rather confrontational. The child actors are quite young. It's amazing that they were able to memorize their lines and deliver such strong performances. All the young actors stand out in their own unique way. The film made me want to be more conscious of what I eat and makes me want to be healthier. My favorite part of the film is the montage of the children playing, showcasing the beauty of youth and innocence.

The message is to be aware of what you eat and make sure it's healthy. At a young age, the children are discovering what is best to eat and what is not, ensuring healthy choices are made.

I give this film 3 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 6 to 12. I believe any family should watch this film to spread awareness about the importance of eating healthy from a young age. Reviewed by Heather S., KIDS FIRST!
KIDS FIRST!® Kid Jurors say - The film puts out an interesting question about what qualifies as healthy food. It's well presented and leaves it up to the viewer to make up their own mind.

The storyline follows three young children at a play date. All is fun and happy until the mom brings out a platter of snacks. One little boy claims that the snacks aren't healthy and the mom shrugs him off, saying, "maybe it's more polite to eat whatever people offer us." The question is to decipher whether food is healthy or not. The boy questions whether the snacks served are nutritious or not. One person claims that the snacks aren't healthy; another says it is healthy enough and there's enough food to go around. It makes one question whether or not the snacks served were healthy or not. If not, why did the mom serve it. The film ends with a statement about how chemicals in food shape our DNA, followed by a message on screen saying, "There's enough for everyone." Are we serving our children unhealthy food?

The production work is quite satisfactory. My favorite camera shots are those of the children playing, without dialogue. The montages of the children playing in the bright afternoon and the light shining down on them are lovely. The soft, calming background music drives the non-narrative scenes, creating a calm atmosphere to the topic of this film, which is rather confrontational. The child actors are quite young. It's amazing that they were able to memorize their lines and deliver such strong performances. All the young actors stand out in their own unique way. The film made me want to be more conscious of what I eat and makes me want to be healthier. My favorite part of the film is the montage of the children playing, showcasing the beauty of youth and innocence.

The message is to be aware of what you eat and make sure it's healthy. At a young age, the children are discovering what is best to eat and what is not, ensuring healthy choices are made.

I give this film 3 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 6 to 12. I believe any family should watch this film to spread awareness about the importance of eating healthy from a young age. Reviewed by Heather S., KIDS FIRST!
Runtime: 7 minutes Juror Recommended Age: 7-18 Suggested Retail Price: $ Media: VIDEO



This title is in the KIDS FIRST! Film Festival - it may not be a regular, endorsed title
RUTH & NICK: A CONFECTIONERY TALE
RUTH & NICK: A CONFECTIONERY TALE - CARTER ROSTRON
Series: INDIE SHORT, AGES 5-18
Description - This stop-motion animated short tells the bittersweet story of Nick, a piece of candy who falls in love with a girl who seems out of reach. This film was made by 15-year-old Carter Rostron of Kansas City, using cardboard, construction paper, and a bunch of candy.
KIDS FIRST!® Adult Jurors say - I love the short student film Ruth and Nick: A Confectionary Tale. It has three of my favorite things - classical music, stop motion and candy! The storyline is very creative and cute. The music and sound effects are wonderful.

This story is about a piece of candy named Nick. Nick loves to dance. When he sees Ruth, it is love at first sight. The problem is, Ruth is a popular candy and Nick is not. When there is a dance, Nick starts dancing and Ruth joins in with him and they dance the night away. And they live happily ever after.

I love that the storyline is a candy love story, not just a random love story. I also like that it includes popular candies such as Reeses and Twix, and less popular candies like Tootsie Rolls and Smarties.

The film is made in stop motion animation, which is a very tedious process, and it looks great. The backgrounds are all homemade, which you can tell. They fit the storyline perfectly. The background music and sound effects music are constant and definitely enhance the action of the film. I especially like the music that they danced to. The narrator is Carter Rostron, who is also the creator. His voice is very clear with good inflections. (He's also from Kansas City, my home town!) My favorite scene is when Ruth and Nick dance the night away, because the stop motion movement is very smooth and fun, plus I love the music choice.

The message of the film is stated at the end: "Love is sweetest when it's a surprise" and you can find love no matter who you are.

I give this film 5 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 4 to 18, plus adults. It is cute, clear, and will bring a smile to anyone who watches it. Reviewed by Katherine S., KIDS FIRST!
KIDS FIRST!® Kid Jurors say - Ruth & Nick: A Confectionery Tale has so many different candies. It also plays off some words like Ruth is a Baby Ruth and having the popular kids "snicker." There is a dancing scene that is very visually appealing and fun to watch.

Nick is a nice carefree guy who just wants to have fun in life. Then he meets Ruth and instantly falls in love. But Ruth is part of the popular kids and Nick is not in the most popular crowd. Nick goes to a Candy Gala and sees Ruth. Will they get together? Watch to find out.

I really like how this story reflects things that people relate to. It shows how lots of schools operate and reflects on life from the point of view of candy. The stop motion is well made. It is really visually appealing and really catches the eye. There are some cool backgrounds for the dance with an amazing construction paper created dance floor and great looking rolling hills background, also made from construction paper. Some cool background music plays while the characters are being explained and during the dance. All the music is courtesy of YouTube's audio library. All the voice overs for the candy characters are by Carter Rostron, who is also the creator of the film. It taught me more about how the film was made using stop motion. My favorite scene is when they go to the gala.

The message is that love is sweetest when it is a surprise.

I give this film 5 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 6 to 18, plus adults. Reviewed by Avalon N., KIDS FIRST! Film Critic
Runtime: 6 minutes Juror Recommended Age: 5-18 Suggested Retail Price: $ Media: VIDEO



This title is in the KIDS FIRST! Film Festival - it may not be a regular, endorsed title
DARING TO BE DIFFERENT
DARING TO BE DIFFERENT - MARVIN J LOWE
Series: INDIE SHORT, AGES 7-18
Description - A girl faces losing her identity from being bullied while dealing with heartbreaking family matters. A surprising event helps her regain her distinctiveness...
KIDS FIRST!® Adult Jurors say - Daring To Be Different is a film that a lot of people can relate to because of its message about bullying, family issues and peer pressure.

This short film tells the story of a girl in middle school figuring out life, while her parents are separating and she is being bullied. She and her mom find peace with god.

The plot development is a bit jagged. There aren't many details and or background information about the characters, so it's not easy to relate to them. You sort of have to piece together parts of the story on your own.

The camera is quite well done. Nothing is very remarkable, although I really like the close-ups on the girl as she tries to communicate with her mom. The background music is very good. The theme song was written by the director and writer, which is admirable. Sometimes the music and background sounds are a bit too loud and overshadow the dialogue. Also, in one of the outdoor scenes, the audio picks up the sound of the wind. All of the actors perform quite well and give believable performances. My favorite part is the ending when the girl and her "bully" become friends after asking God for help.

The message is about faith and the importance of standing up.

I give this 3 film out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 8 to 18, plus adults. Reviewed by Ava H., KIDS FIRST! Film Critic
KIDS FIRST!® Kid Jurors say - Daring To Be Different is a film that a lot of people can relate to because of its message about bullying, family issues and peer pressure.

This short film tells the story of a girl in middle school figuring out life, while her parents are separating and she is being bullied. She and her mom find peace with god.

The plot development is a bit jagged. There aren't many details and or background information about the characters, so it's not easy to relate to them. You sort of have to piece together parts of the story on your own.

The camera is quite well done. Nothing is very remarkable, although I really like the close-ups on the girl as she tries to communicate with her mom. The background music is very good. The theme song was written by the director and writer, which is admirable. Sometimes the music and background sounds are a bit too loud and overshadow the dialogue. Also, in one of the outdoor scenes, the audio picks up the sound of the wind. All of the actors perform quite well and give believable performances. My favorite part is the ending when the girl and her "bully" become friends after asking God for help.

The message is about faith and the importance of standing up.

I give this 3 film out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 8 to 18, plus adults. Reviewed by Ava H., KIDS FIRST! Film Critic
Runtime: 24 minutes Juror Recommended Age: 7-18 Suggested Retail Price: $ Media: VIDEO



This title is in the KIDS FIRST! Film Festival - it may not be a regular, endorsed title
GLOBAL GAME CHANGERS LEARNING 9/11
GLOBAL GAME CHANGERS LEARNING 9/11 - JAN HELSON
Series: INDIE SHORT, AGES 6-18
Description - Superheroes come in ALL shapes and sizes. Some are billionaire bats. Some are from an Amazon island. Some are even KIDS. Global Game Changers to be exact. The Global Game Changers Alliance: Global Girl, Acer, Moxie, IQ, , Pia (and her trusty sidekick, Pixel), Leo (Little Big-Heart), and Vaniya are scrappy, imperfect kid superheroes who fight off the evil, life draining force of apathy, a dark cloud named Krumi. They help real-life kids build the confidence to battle Krumi and IGNITE GOOD!� using the GGC equation, MY TALENT + MY HEART = MY SUPERPOWER!� Seasoned heroes, they are not. They make mistakes, stumble (literally) and sometimes their enthusiasm outweighs their skill sets. But when they tap into their inner superpower, together they always find a way to make a difference. Global Game Changers believe that it doesn't matter who you are, where you come from, or how old you are; you can make a difference in the world.
KIDS FIRST!® Adult Jurors say - I like the short animated film Global Game Changers Learning 9/11. It talks about the tragic event of 9/11 in a way that is understandable with simple vocabulary. They interview first responders who give personal perspectives, which make it much more real. I like that the young characters are so curious and I like that this takes a very positive approach to discussing the event.

The story talks about 9/11 and why it is an event to remember. It interviews people who helped or survivors of this ordeal.

The film answers a lot of broad questions that viewers might have if they do not know about the incident. They avoid showing graphic details such as actual wreckage, fires, or the Twin Towers going down, which could be too much for younger viewers. Each character has its own opinion and curiosity, which makes the film seem very authentic. It also features live interview with witnesses and rescue workers who lived through this nightmare, which makes it relatable to our own ordeals that we live through. The scenes that impressed me most are those when they interview people. Those interviews truly make it a lot easier to paint the picture of the tragedy. Most of them still have an emotion in their voice, as if this occurred yesterday. The thing that also impressed me is when the curious kid asks why we should we remember this event if it is so tragic. The screenwriter really thought of how audiences respond. The animated characters are voiced by actors that sound like children. I admire the work of the production designer and the director as the scenes are really appealing and very artsy. The key influencer here is the person that managed to get hold of the survivors of 9/11 and the screenwriter. The most standout group is the production designer as there are a lot of visuals that make it appealing to younger audiences. My favorite part is the interview with a survivor that actually went through the ordeal of having to deal with the sheer terror of a plane crashing into the Pentagon. That interview paints a detailed picture of how bad the situation was as he shows a diagram of where he was when the plane crashed into the Pentagon. He wraps up the interview with a reminder that kindness is always greater than evil or apathy.

The message of the film is that we need to learn how to recover from an incident such as 9/11, no matter how big or small it is.

I give this film 5 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 6 to 18, plus adults. It is an good way for younger audiences to learn about 9/11 and promotes taking a positive attitude towards recovering from a tragedy such as this. Reviewed by Tom W., KIDS FIRST!
KIDS FIRST!® Kid Jurors say - I like the short animated film Global Game Changers Learning 9/11. It talks about the tragic event of 9/11 in a way that is understandable with simple vocabulary. They interview first responders who give personal perspectives, which make it much more real. I like that the young characters are so curious and I like that this takes a very positive approach to discussing the event.

The story talks about 9/11 and why it is an event to remember. It interviews people who helped or survivors of this ordeal.

The film answers a lot of broad questions that viewers might have if they do not know about the incident. They avoid showing graphic details such as actual wreckage, fires, or the Twin Towers going down, which could be too much for younger viewers. Each character has its own opinion and curiosity, which makes the film seem very authentic. It also features live interview with witnesses and rescue workers who lived through this nightmare, which makes it relatable to our own ordeals that we live through. The scenes that impressed me most are those when they interview people. Those interviews truly make it a lot easier to paint the picture of the tragedy. Most of them still have an emotion in their voice, as if this occurred yesterday. The thing that also impressed me is when the curious kid asks why we should we remember this event if it is so tragic. The screenwriter really thought of how audiences respond. The animated characters are voiced by actors that sound like children. I admire the work of the production designer and the director as the scenes are really appealing and very artsy. The key influencer here is the person that managed to get hold of the survivors of 9/11 and the screenwriter. The most standout group is the production designer as there are a lot of visuals that make it appealing to younger audiences. My favorite part is the interview with a survivor that actually went through the ordeal of having to deal with the sheer terror of a plane crashing into the Pentagon. That interview paints a detailed picture of how bad the situation was as he shows a diagram of where he was when the plane crashed into the Pentagon. He wraps up the interview with a reminder that kindness is always greater than evil or apathy.

The message of the film is that we need to learn how to recover from an incident such as 9/11, no matter how big or small it is.

I give this film 5 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 6 to 18, plus adults. It is an good way for younger audiences to learn about 9/11 and promotes taking a positive attitude towards recovering from a tragedy such as this. Reviewed by Tom W., KIDS FIRST!
Runtime: 22 minutes Juror Recommended Age: 6-18 Suggested Retail Price: $ Media: VIDEO



This title is in the KIDS FIRST! Film Festival - it may not be a regular, endorsed title
CAPE KIDS TO THE RESCUE
CAPE KIDS TO THE RESCUE - JAN HELSON
Series: INDIE SHORT, AGES 5-12
Description - Cape Kids, a team of six scrappy kid superheroes + one dog, use their IGNITE GOOD!� superpowers to fight off their arch nemesis, the evil, life draining force of apathy, a dark cloud, named KRUMI. When they tap into their unique superhero equation, MY TALENT + MY HEART = MY SUPERPOWER!� and enlist the help of real-life kids to join the alliance, they always find a way to save the day and IGNITE GOOD! Based on Global Game Changers Student Empowerment Program Education Nonprofit Curriculum.
KIDS FIRST!® Adult Jurors say - What makes Cape Kids to the Rescue appealing is that you can learn about the environment and as you learn about stuff you may not have known.

This animated short film follows a group of six kids that call themselves the Cape Kids. Their talent, plus their heart are their superpower. They use their superpowers to defeat their enemy KRUMI, a dark cloud that brainwashes people into doing harmful things for the environment. They need to stop him before he does some serious damage to the environment.

The story line is fun and exciting film, while being informational. The 2D animation is well executed. The characters are very cartoonish looking and there are lots of varied camera angles where you can see everything going on around them. The backgrounds are pretty realistic looking. The costumes for the characters are fun. The background music doesn't stand out very much; it just helps support the pace of the show. The voice talent is good, although some of the female voices are annoyingly squeaky. KRUMI is voiced by Josh Banks, who is also the director. Rachel Annette Helson voices Moxie and is also the writer and producer. This is an independent film, which explains the dual roles, but everyone is very professional. In fact, I completely that it is an independent film once I was drawn into the story. My favorite thing about the film is that you get to learn and enjoy yourself at the same time.

The message of this film is that you don't have to have a superpower to get a super power. Your talent plus your heart equals your super power and you can use your super power for the greater good.

I give this film 4 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 5 to 12. Reviewed by Giana N., KIDS FIRST!
KIDS FIRST!® Kid Jurors say - What makes Cape Kids to the Rescue appealing is that you can learn about the environment and as you learn about stuff you may not have known.

This animated short film follows a group of six kids that call themselves the Cape Kids. Their talent, plus their heart are their superpower. They use their superpowers to defeat their enemy KRUMI, a dark cloud that brainwashes people into doing harmful things for the environment. They need to stop him before he does some serious damage to the environment.

The story line is fun and exciting film, while being informational. The 2D animation is well executed. The characters are very cartoonish looking and there are lots of varied camera angles where you can see everything going on around them. The backgrounds are pretty realistic looking. The costumes for the characters are fun. The background music doesn't stand out very much; it just helps support the pace of the show. The voice talent is good, although some of the female voices are annoyingly squeaky. KRUMI is voiced by Josh Banks, who is also the director. Rachel Annette Helson voices Moxie and is also the writer and producer. This is an independent film, which explains the dual roles, but everyone is very professional. In fact, I completely that it is an independent film once I was drawn into the story. My favorite thing about the film is that you get to learn and enjoy yourself at the same time.

The message of this film is that you don't have to have a superpower to get a super power. Your talent plus your heart equals your super power and you can use your super power for the greater good.

I give this film 4 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 5 to 12. Reviewed by Giana N., KIDS FIRST
Runtime: 11 minutes Juror Recommended Age: 5-12 Suggested Retail Price: $ Media: VIDEO



This title is in the KIDS FIRST! Film Festival - it may not be a regular, endorsed title
GOLDILOCKS AND THE THREE FAMILIES OF BEARS
GOLDILOCKS AND THE THREE FAMILIES OF BEARS - WOOLLY VISION
Series: FOREIGN SHORT, AGES 2-5
Description - This film accompanies an original song based on the story of "Goldilocks and the Three Bears". This story introduces three new bear families to represent family life as it is in the world today. The panda baby bear has two Mums, the polar baby bear has two Dads and the brown baby bear has a Mum and a Dad.
KIDS FIRST!® Adult Jurors say - Goldilocks and the Three Families of Bears takes a story that we have not heard in a long time and does something new with it, making the story into a song. Also, it includes three types of bears which is something the original does not do - Polar, Panda and Grizzly.

The story line is sort of a cross between Three Little Pigs and Goldilocks and the Three Bears. It follows Goldilocks going to three different bears' houses, all different types of architecture, and she samples stuff in each house while they are not there like their food, beds and chairs. When they get home they notice their stuff has been used.

I like the innovative twist on the classic story here. The puppets are adorable. The camera work is quite good. The main shot that impressed me is the one of their houses - a Japanese style home, an igloo and a log cabin - where you can see both the inside and the outside. I also like how detailed the sets and the locations are. What really stands out to me about the music is that it comes from London and the singer has a British accent. The best part things about it are the music and the puppets. Gemma Storr's voice is quite wonderful.

The message is that individual actions can hurt others, like when one person destroys or uses someone else's property. The only warning is that Goldilocks does go into people's houses when they are not there, which isn't so cool.

I give this film 4 out of 5 stars and recommend it to ages 2 to 18. It would make a sweet addition to a film festival for youth and families. Reviewed by Ayden P., KIDS FIRST! Film Critic
KIDS FIRST!® Kid Jurors say - Goldilocks and the Three Families of Bears takes a story that we have not heard in a long time and does something new with it, making the story into a song. Also, it includes three types of bears which is something the original does not do - Polar, Panda and Grizzly.

The story line is sort of a cross between Three Little Pigs and Goldilocks and the Three Bears. It follows Goldilocks going to three different bears' houses, all different types of architecture, and she samples stuff in each house while they are not there like their food, beds and chairs. When they get home they notice their stuff has been used.

I like the innovative twist on the classic story here. The puppets are adorable. The camera work is quite good. The main shot that impressed me is the one of their houses - a Japanese style home, an igloo and a log cabin - where you can see both the inside and the outside. I also like how detailed the sets and the locations are. What really stands out to me about the music is that it comes from London and the singer has a British accent. The best part things about it are the music and the puppets. Gemma Storr's voice is quite wonderful.

The message is that individual actions can hurt others, like when one person destroys or uses someone else's property. The only warning is that Goldilocks does go into people's houses when they are not there, which isn't so cool.

I give this film 4 out of 5 stars and recommend it to ages 2 to 18. It would make a sweet addition to a film festival for youth and families. Reviewed by Ayden P., KIDS FIRST! Film Critic
Runtime: 2 minutes Juror Recommended Age: 2-5 Suggested Retail Price: $ Media: VIDEO



This title is in the KIDS FIRST! Film Festival - it may not be a regular, endorsed title
INSIDE THE LITTLE BOX - CHILD'S SECRETS
INSIDE THE LITTLE BOX - CHILD'S SECRETS - GUILHERME REIS
Series: FOREIGN FEATURE, AGES 5-12
Description - Three brothers gain popularity at school with their grandmother's boxes, family heirlooms that are a doorway to a universe from their nursery rhymes, but because of their actions their father is unable to join them...and their use of the boxes has drawn the attention of a greedy businessman. From Brazil, dialogue in Portuguese, English subtitles
KIDS FIRST!® Adult Jurors say - I enjoyed the concept of Inside the Little Box and its message about maintain one's childhood. The idea that adults sometimes wish they could be a child again resonates with audiences.

The storyline focuses on three siblings who were gifted magical boxes from their grandmother. If the user of the box truly wants to play, then the box transports them to a "different dimension" to have fun. There is a side plot about a man who is in desperate need of developing a new toy for his business, which the box would be the ideal for. In addition, the film focuses somewhat on the sibling's father's attempt to reach his inner self.

The idea of the story is enjoyable. The grandmother makes mention that after she received a big box (a TV) her little boxes lost meaning, as playing was not done when she grew up. This idea of a changing society is nicely touched upon by the film. The camera work is quite good. There are many instances where the children break into song and the camera moves through the crowd. That movement provides a sense of presence in the dance, as if the viewer is part of the film. When the locations are in a real location, they come off much better than when the box is used. Granted, the boxes are created by the children's imagination, but they don't come across as quite believable. The imagined spaces are so different from reality that they lose their sense of feasibility. There are many songs throughout, sung by the children. There is excellent use of sound effects when the box is opened. The sound is somewhat divine and only occurs when the box is working. It shows that the box is working and also that there is a special sense of "magic" behind the boxes. Also, there is an ominous glow that comes from the box when it is opened. The acting is quite good. Each character truly assumes their role and acts accordingly. No character stands out, as they are all at the same relative skill of acting. There is one scene where the grandmother is retelling the story of a game she played with her friends and the subtitles are incorrect. The game is about a boy trying to date a girl whose father disapproves. Instead of "little girl," the subtitles read "little sister" which may give children the wrong idea. The subtitles are quite good.

The message of the film is about cherishing one's childhood and simple things - like the little boxes. My favorite scene is when the grandmother retells the story of how she first obtained the boxes and then, one day, her father came home with a bigger box, that from a TV, and her little boxes became insignificant. This scene highlights a key problem in today's society as we are more drawn to technology than social interaction.

I give this film 4 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 5 to 12, plus adults. It is from Brazil with dialogue in Portuguese, with English subtitles. It provides a nice sense of Brazilian culture and allows the viewers to develop an understanding of some Portuguese words. Reviewed by Ray R. and team, KIDS FIRST!
KIDS FIRST!® Kid Jurors say - I enjoyed the concept of Inside the Little Box and its message about maintain one's childhood. The idea that adults sometimes wish they could be a child again resonates with audiences.

The storyline focuses on three siblings who were gifted magical boxes from their grandmother. If the user of the box truly wants to play, then the box transports them to a "different dimension" to have fun. There is a side plot about a man who is in desperate need of developing a new toy for his business, which the box would be the ideal for. In addition, the film focuses somewhat on the sibling's father's attempt to reach his inner self.

The idea of the story is enjoyable. The grandmother makes mention that after she received a big box (a TV) her little boxes lost meaning, as playing was not done when she grew up. This idea of a changing society is nicely touched upon by the film. The camera work is quite good. There are many instances where the children break into song and the camera moves through the crowd. That movement provides a sense of presence in the dance, as if the viewer is part of the film. When the locations are in a real location, they come off much better than when the box is used. Granted, the boxes are created by the children's imagination, but they don't come across as quite believable. The imagined spaces are so different from reality that they lose their sense of feasibility. There are many songs throughout, sung by the children. There is excellent use of sound effects when the box is opened. The sound is somewhat divine and only occurs when the box is working. It shows that the box is working and also that there is a special sense of "magic" behind the boxes. Also, there is an ominous glow that comes from the box when it is opened. The acting is quite good. Each character truly assumes their role and acts accordingly. No character stands out, as they are all at the same relative skill of acting. There is one scene where the grandmother is retelling the story of a game she played with her friends and the subtitles are incorrect. The game is about a boy trying to date a girl whose father disapproves. Instead of "little girl," the subtitles read "little sister" which may give children the wrong idea. The subtitles are quite good.

The message of the film is about cherishing one's childhood and simple things - like the little boxes. My favorite scene is when the grandmother retells the story of how she first obtained the boxes and then, one day, her father came home with a bigger box, that from a TV, and her little boxes became insignificant. This scene highlights a key problem in today's society as we are more drawn to technology than social interaction.

I give this film 4 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 5 to 12, plus adults. It is from Brazil with dialogue in Portuguese, with English subtitles. It provides a nice sense of Brazilian culture and allows the viewers to develop an understanding of some Portuguese words. Reviewed by Ray R. and team, KIDS FIRST!
Runtime: 78 minutes Juror Recommended Age: 5-12 Suggested Retail Price: $ Media: VIDEO



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