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CROSSING BORDERS

What to know: A seventy minute documentary following four Moroccan and four American university students as they travel for seven days through the rich cultural landscape of Morocco and in the process of discovering "the other," discover themselves.
CROSSING BORDERS is in the KIDS FIRST! Film Festival - it may not be a regular, endorsed title
Recommended age 12-18
70 minutes
DVD
CROSSING BORDERS FILMS
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This film is everything we look for from indie filmmakers - an accurate, non-commercial, in-depth look at the world around us from a fresh perspective. The appeal is its importance and timeliness. With tension growing between the U.S. and the Muslin world, younger generations on both sides need messages such as this to cultivate more understanding and less hostility. It is fresh, spontaneous and unscripted. The videographic snapshots of Morocco are outstanding showing its cities, coasts, beautiful countryside and, most importantly, its people. The camera work is skillful and unobtrusive; the editing excellent. It is reality TV unlike what we normally see. Instead of spoiled Americans struggling with the material challenges of our affluent society, here we see four kids more or less like themselves, immersed in a culture quite different and currently maligned by our own. Their Moroccan counterparts prove to be engaging and their perspectives compelling. In the end, viewers will begin to see common human, even teen, treads emerge. Also, they will come away much more thankful for the tangible creature comforts they have and more aware of less tangible emotional connections they probably don't have with their family, community and religion.
A seventy minute documentary following four Moroccan and four American university students as they travel for seven days through the rich cultural landscape of Morocco and in the process of discovering "the other," discover themselves. With group home stays, travels, hikes and emotional, frank discussions, the students confront the complex implications of the supposed "clash of civilizations" between Islam and the West. The relationships formed through shared experiences contrast sharply with the media-shaped views Americans and Muslins have of each other. Humor, honesty and a willingness to be challenged all bring individuals closer to each other and the friendships that develop disarm hidden stereotypes.
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