Watch Kids' Reviews of
FRIENDLY FACES & SAFE SPACES

What to know: Kudos to this filmmaker for such a creative way of presenting mental health issues to an audience of kids using muppets.
FRIENDLY FACES & SAFE SPACES is in the KIDS FIRST! Film Festival - it may not be a regular, endorsed title
Recommended age 10-15
9 minutes
VIDEO
LEAH GALLOWAY
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FRIENDLY FACES & SAFE SPACES cover image
This documentary attempts to educate kids about different mental health issues in a way they can relate to. It offers a message of self-acceptance and does this by using puppets to display common, though often ignored, symptoms of ADHD, anxiety and other issues.

I found this film incredibly enlightening and personal. Shining a light on ADHD, for example, is extremely important. Using puppets to get children to learn is a unique method that I greatly admire. Also, the scenes showing the audience point of view are particularly enjoyable, so credits to the filmmaker for that. The production is very professionally made, although it has some audio issues at points.

I love that the documentary shares actual experiences by its creators. What stands out most is the script by Leah Galloway and Chris Bacon. I like that they address the ignorance around mental health and find ways to get students to participate during their presentation. The design for the puppets is very creative and colorful. Certainly, the puppets appeal to the target age of this documentary - elementary school kids. story The part about parents not relating to their child's mental health issues is very eye opening. My favorite part about this documentary are the puppets; they are similar to Sesame Street Muppets, which charmed me and I think most young children will enjoy them.

The message of this documentary is to accept yourself and don't try to alter the unique things about you.

I give this 4 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 4 to 12. Reviewed by Joshitha B, KIDS FIRST! Film Critic

This documentary attempts to educate kids about different mental health issues in a way they can relate to. It offers a message of self-acceptance and does this by using puppets to display common, though often ignored, symptoms of ADHD, anxiety and other issues.

I found this film incredibly enlightening and personal. Shining a light on ADHD, for example, is extremely important. Using puppets to get children to learn is a unique method that I greatly admire. Also, the scenes showing the audience point of view are particularly enjoyable, so credits to the filmmaker for that. The production is very professionally made, although it has some audio issues at points.

I love that the documentary shares actual experiences by its creators. What stands out most is the script by Leah Galloway and Chris Bacon. I like that they address the ignorance around mental health and find ways to get students to participate during their presentation. The design for the puppets is very creative and colorful. Certainly, the puppets appeal to the target age of this documentary - elementary school kids. story The part about parents not relating to their child's mental health issues is very eye opening. My favorite part about this documentary are the puppets; they are similar to Sesame Street Muppets, which charmed me and I think most young children will enjoy them.

The message of this documentary is to accept yourself and don't try to alter the unique things about you.

I give this 4 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 4 to 12. Reviewed by Joshitha B, KIDS FIRST! Film Critic

Steven Botelho, a puppet maker hailing from Milton, Ontario, designs and creates puppets that represent a variety of different mental, physical, and learning disabilities to attempt to educate young children in the entertaining form of puppetry. Together with his fianc� Tony Babcock, Steven is attempting to change the world with his puppetry, and bring forth a new perspective of the reality of the different disabilities young children may come across as they grow up, and how they can work to look past them to see the person for who they are.
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