Watch Kids' Reviews of
RAISING GLOBAL CITIZENS

What to know:
RAISING GLOBAL CITIZENS is in the KIDS FIRST! Film Festival - it may not be a regular, endorsed title
Recommended age 5-10
80 minutes
FeatureFilm
JOEL PRIMUS
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RAISING GLOBAL CITIZENS cover image
Raising Global Citizens serves as a reminder for all of us to be accepting toward, appreciative of, and willing to explore new cultures. The many picturesque settings and the unique family dynamic depicted herein make this short film an enjoyable family watch. The Primus Family - Joel, Janna, Quinn and Romyn - embark on a year-long journey across Argentina, Colombia, The Yukon, Vietnam and Lebanon. Over the course of the trip, they endeavor to strengthen their bond as a family, learn more about where family and travel intersect and define the phrase 'global citizen.'

Many travel documentaries have drearily humdrum plots that seem to be snail-paced. Raising Global Citizens, on the other hand, excites, enthralls and intrigues viewers. The unique destinations, fun yet insightful narration and cool activities shown in the film all work together to make this film a masterpiece.

The cinematography feels professional and simultaneously quite organic - two terms that are normally diametrically opposed. The footage in this film isn't overly doctored or edited to the point where it is obvious this concept was thought out beforehand. This film feels like a family documenting their travels, and I love that! My favorite shots are the macro pan of the ruins of Baalbek and the scenes in Ho Chi Minh City's busy markets (mesmerizing!), as well as the bokeh shots thrown in throughout the film.

This film is shot in multiple locations across the globe. All of the locations are one-of-a-kind and lend a "je ne sais quoi" of their own to the viewing experience. The natural beauty of the Canadian bush, the serenity of the Mekong River and pure magnificence of the Baalbek ruins enhance Joel's narration. In Vietnam, the Primus family dresses in traditional Vietnamese clothes for many shots. It is obvious the production crew has put lots of thought into the background score for this film. In Argentina, Colombia, Vietnam and Lebanon, traditional music underscores the goings-on. I find the addition of this type of music helps immerse the viewer into the locale. When I watched the film, I felt as if I was right beside the Primus family on their adventures. I love the portion of the film in Lebanon. The Primus family's take on the nation is very apropos of current events and the overall camera work will wow viewers.

Connor Moran directed and wrote the film, together with Joel Primus. Joel and his wife Janna worked with Adam Besse as co-producers. Joel Barrow took the lead on videography. Joel, Janna and their daughters Romyn and Quinn are the stars of this film. They are not actors, which makes the film feel very real and personal - an element that is difficult to find in modern films.

The message of the film is about how acceptance, awareness and appreciation of other cultures and nations is crucial to our status as global citizens. You might want to know that gunshots are heard at one point.

I give Raising Global Citizens 4 out of 5 stars and recommend it to ages 8 to 18, plus adults. This film is masterfully created, educational and a great family watch. Reviewed by Eshaan M., KIDS FIRST! Film Critic

Raising Global Citizens serves as a reminder for all of us to be accepting toward, appreciative of, and willing to explore new cultures. The many picturesque settings and the unique family dynamic depicted herein make this short film an enjoyable family watch. The Primus Family - Joel, Janna, Quinn and Romyn - embark on a year-long journey across Argentina, Colombia, The Yukon, Vietnam and Lebanon. Over the course of the trip, they endeavor to strengthen their bond as a family, learn more about where family and travel intersect and define the phrase 'global citizen.'

Many travel documentaries have drearily humdrum plots that seem to be snail-paced. Raising Global Citizens, on the other hand, excites, enthralls and intrigues viewers. The unique destinations, fun yet insightful narration and cool activities shown in the film all work together to make this film a masterpiece.

The cinematography feels professional and simultaneously quite organic - two terms that are normally diametrically opposed. The footage in this film isn't overly doctored or edited to the point where it is obvious this concept was thought out beforehand. This film feels like a family documenting their travels, and I love that! My favorite shots are the macro pan of the ruins of Baalbek and the scenes in Ho Chi Minh City's busy markets (mesmerizing!), as well as the bokeh shots thrown in throughout the film.

This film is shot in multiple locations across the globe. All of the locations are one-of-a-kind and lend a "je ne sais quoi" of their own to the viewing experience. The natural beauty of the Canadian bush, the serenity of the Mekong River and pure magnificence of the Baalbek ruins enhance Joel's narration. In Vietnam, the Primus family dresses in traditional Vietnamese clothes for many shots. It is obvious the production crew has put lots of thought into the background score for this film. In Argentina, Colombia, Vietnam and Lebanon, traditional music underscores the goings-on. I find the addition of this type of music helps immerse the viewer into the locale. When I watched the film, I felt as if I was right beside the Primus family on their adventures. I love the portion of the film in Lebanon. The Primus family's take on the nation is very apropos of current events and the overall camera work will wow viewers.

Connor Moran directed and wrote the film, together with Joel Primus. Joel and his wife Janna worked with Adam Besse as co-producers. Joel Barrow took the lead on videography. Joel, Janna and their daughters Romyn and Quinn are the stars of this film. They are not actors, which makes the film feel very real and personal - an element that is difficult to find in modern films.

The message of the film is about how acceptance, awareness and appreciation of other cultures and nations is crucial to our status as global citizens. You might want to know that gunshots are heard at one point.

I give Raising Global Citizens 4 out of 5 stars and recommend it to ages 8 to 18, plus adults. This film is masterfully created, educational and a great family watch. Reviewed by Eshaan M., KIDS FIRST! Film Critic

A couple with two young children decide to embark on a year long journey across the world, travelling through Argentina, Colombia, The Yukon, Vietnam and Lebanon, in hopes of learning how parenting and world travel combine, and what it means to be a citizen of the world.
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