Watch Kids' Reviews of
YARNE

What to know: Heartwarming film with beautiful settings and rich cultural education that offers a rare glance of Tibetan monk's life outside of the prayer room.
YARNE is in the KIDS FIRST! Film Festival - it may not be a regular, endorsed title
Recommended age 10-18
15 minutes
VIDEO
ANDREW KRAKOWER
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YARNE cover image
The beautiful settings and rich cultural education provided by the short film Yarne make it a wonderful watch. This short film offers a rare glance of the monk's life outside of the prayer room. I appreciate that director Andrew Krakower does not romanticize the image of the child monks excessively. He shows that they too are human and creates incredibly realistic characters based on his own experiences in Kathmandu. I also love the incredible architecture and culture shown in the film. The film team captures the essence of monastic life through majestic panoramic shots of intricate murals inside the monastery and the greenery-filled grounds.

Named for the period of time when Buddhist monks stay inside the monastery, praying throughout the day, Yarne is the story of Sonam and Tashi, 11-year old monks in Kathmandu. With the money they earn, they barely can afford a single bottle of Coke and Sonam can barely sneak a sip in before Tashi, the bully, drinks the rest of the bottle. Tired of wasting his money, Sonam decides to save up every rupee he earns to buy a soccer ball, but first, he will have to muster the courage to stand up to Tashi.

This is a story that is relatable to many, not in the context of monastic life, but in the context of bullying. This is an empowering film to shows to an audience of children, as it encourages them to stand up for themselves. It also shows them the value of money. All of the dialogue is very organic and natural. Yarne does not seem scripted whatsoever.

The cinematography is top-class. The camera work emphasizes the beauty of the culture, the theme and the storyline. My favorite shots are inside the monastery during prayers. The murals of the monastery, the calligraphy of the ancient texts and even the creases in the monk's robes are crisp and sharply detailed. I also am impressed by the stability of the shots the children took - despite running around while holding the camera, there is little to no blur.

All of the monks wear traditional saffron and crimson kasaya, a type of triple-layered robe. This is befitting of the storyline and time period. Those who are not monks wear traditional Nepalese clothing like kurtas, or tunics. Yarne is shot mostly in Ka-Nying Shedrub Ling Monastery in the town of Boudhanath, on the outskirts of Kathmandu. This monastery is led by the Tibetan Buddhist teacher, author, monk and meditation master Ven. Tulku Chokyi Nyima Rinpoche, who appears in several scenes. The monastery is ages old and is absolutely magical. I'll go as far as to say that the beauty of the setting transformed the viewing experience for me.

The music of Yarne is completely in Tibetan and Nepalese, with songs like Nyingjemo, Om Tare Tuttare Ture Soha and Rinchen Trengwa Chod. Some of these songs have religious ties as well. Many of the songs are sung by the monks in the monastery but many Nepalese and Tibetan talents have lent their voices to the film. The music adds a new level of exoticism and enjoy-ability, so to speak, to the viewing experience of the film. The music really encapsulates all the emotions.

Andrew Krakower is the director, writer and producer of Yarne. Dawa Dorjee plays Tashi and Sonam is portayed by Konchok Rangdol. I enjoyed Rangdol's performance. His skill at delivery and his realistic expressions sell the role. Dorjee is also incredibly persuasive in his performance as Tashi; he really gets into the role! After watching this film, I learned more about the life of a monk and Buddhism. I loved the character of Sonam - he's so endearing! Ven. Tulku Chokyi Nyima Rinpoche appears in this film, which is a rarity.

The message is to stand up for yourself. There are one or two instances of the young monks roughhousing and messing with one another, and the adults don't address this behavior. Bullying is also shown. But there is an active message against such behavior.

I give Yarne 5 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 10 to 18, plus adults, This heartwarming and educational film would be a wonderful addition to a youth and family film festival. After all, it's not often you come across a short film in the Tibetan language. Of course the film is subtitled in English. Reviewed by Eshaan M., KIDS FIRST! Film Critic

The beautiful settings and rich cultural education provided by the short film Yarne make it a wonderful watch. This short film offers a rare glance of the monk's life outside of the prayer room. I appreciate that director Andrew Krakower does not romanticize the image of the child monks excessively. He shows that they too are human and creates incredibly realistic characters based on his own experiences in Kathmandu. I also love the incredible architecture and culture shown in the film. The film team captures the essence of monastic life through majestic panoramic shots of intricate murals inside the monastery and the greenery-filled grounds.

Named for the period of time when Buddhist monks stay inside the monastery, praying throughout the day, Yarne is the story of Sonam and Tashi, 11-year old monks in Kathmandu. With the money they earn, they barely can afford a single bottle of Coke and Sonam can barely sneak a sip in before Tashi, the bully, drinks the rest of the bottle. Tired of wasting his money, Sonam decides to save up every rupee he earns to buy a soccer ball, but first, he will have to muster the courage to stand up to Tashi.

This is a story that is relatable to many, not in the context of monastic life, but in the context of bullying. This is an empowering film to shows to an audience of children, as it encourages them to stand up for themselves. It also shows them the value of money. All of the dialogue is very organic and natural. Yarne does not seem scripted whatsoever.

The cinematography is top-class. The camera work emphasizes the beauty of the culture, the theme and the storyline. My favorite shots are inside the monastery during prayers. The murals of the monastery, the calligraphy of the ancient texts and even the creases in the monk's robes are crisp and sharply detailed. I also am impressed by the stability of the shots the children took - despite running around while holding the camera, there is little to no blur.

All of the monks wear traditional saffron and crimson kasaya, a type of triple-layered robe. This is befitting of the storyline and time period. Those who are not monks wear traditional Nepalese clothing like kurtas, or tunics. Yarne is shot mostly in Ka-Nying Shedrub Ling Monastery in the town of Boudhanath, on the outskirts of Kathmandu. This monastery is led by the Tibetan Buddhist teacher, author, monk and meditation master Ven. Tulku Chokyi Nyima Rinpoche, who appears in several scenes. The monastery is ages old and is absolutely magical. I'll go as far as to say that the beauty of the setting transformed the viewing experience for me.

The music of Yarne is completely in Tibetan and Nepalese, with songs like Nyingjemo, Om Tare Tuttare Ture Soha and Rinchen Trengwa Chod. Some of these songs have religious ties as well. Many of the songs are sung by the monks in the monastery but many Nepalese and Tibetan talents have lent their voices to the film. The music adds a new level of exoticism and enjoy-ability, so to speak, to the viewing experience of the film. The music really encapsulates all the emotions.

Andrew Krakower is the director, writer and producer of Yarne. Dawa Dorjee plays Tashi and Sonam is portayed by Konchok Rangdol. I enjoyed Rangdol's performance. His skill at delivery and his realistic expressions sell the role. Dorjee is also incredibly persuasive in his performance as Tashi; he really gets into the role! After watching this film, I learned more about the life of a monk and Buddhism. I loved the character of Sonam - he's so endearing! Ven. Tulku Chokyi Nyima Rinpoche appears in this film, which is a rarity.

The message is to stand up for yourself. There are one or two instances of the young monks roughhousing and messing with one another, and the adults don't address this behavior. Bullying is also shown. But there is an active message against such behavior.

I give Yarne 5 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 10 to 18, plus adults, This heartwarming and educational film would be a wonderful addition to a youth and family film festival. After all, it's not often you come across a short film in the Tibetan language. Of course the film is subtitled in English. Reviewed by Eshaan M., KIDS FIRST! Film Critic

The money earned by 11-year-olds Sonam and Tashi for doing prayers is only enough to share one small Coke. Sonam is lucky to even get a sip before Tashi, the monastery bully, drinks the entire bottle. Yarne is an annual six-week period when Buddhist monks remain within the monastery grounds for focused study and practice, yet for child monks, it's more like house arrest. Tired of wasting his money, Sonam decides to save up every rupee he earns during Yarne to buy a soccer ball, but first he will have to stand up to Tashi.
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