Watch Kids' Reviews of
GROWING FOR GOOD

What to know:
GROWING FOR GOOD is in the KIDS FIRST! Film Festival - it may not be a regular, endorsed title
Recommended age 9-14
15 minutes
VIDEO
NOMADIC FRAMES
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GROWING FOR GOOD cover image
The subject matter of Growing for Good is excellent and it is definitely informative and positive, the pace is a bit slow. However, its message is about community, which I love. There should be more people in the world like these farmers and those who help them. Perhaps this film will serve as a vehicle to inspire people to make a change within their own communities. Even though this is a bit long winded, the message is lovely and is so needed today.

The story follows Central West End Farm extending a helping hand to an impoverished community by growing a healthy abundance of crops. Their work helps eliminate hunger for the less fortunate of St. Louis, aids community bonding and provides education for children in a lovely outdoor environment. The camera work is very well done, with a variety of shots and camera angles. I don't feel this is quite memorable enough to be enjoyed at a film festival although the topic is certainly relevant. While the subject is centered on kindness and community and its importance, it is not unique in its approach.

As a documentary, I give it props for the variety of speakers and locations. There is a variety of active dialogue representing young and old alike. It's great to hear real people talking about their personal experiences; it just lacks pizzazz. It is definitely accurate and educational, and gives insight into real issues and how problems are solved. The background sound is very lack luster and repetitive. Also, there are some scenes when the audio has an odd echo. At other times, the music swells inappropriately, making the dialogue difficult to hear. However, the visuals are very good and the camera work is crisp, focused and professional.

The crowing jewel of this film are the lessons is teaches about poverty, hunger, community and service. Many young children don't know about the benefits of community gardens, if they even know about them at all. It certainly encourages the viewer to truly understand where hunger stems from, and how to help combat it in their own communities. I love seeing the lush gardens and the process of planting seeds, tending and harvesting nutritious food for the community of St. Louis, where hunger and poverty can be rampant. The Farm does its part to feed people in need and educating young children about what they can do to make their city a better place. This is a feel good film.

I give Growing for Good 3.5 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 8 to 12, plus adults. Reviewed by Cassidy S., KIDS FIRST! Juror

The subject matter of Growing for Good is excellent and it is definitely informative and positive, the pace is a bit slow. However, its message is about community, which I love. There should be more people in the world like these farmers and those who help them. Perhaps this film will serve as a vehicle to inspire people to make a change within their own communities. Even though this is a bit long winded, the message is lovely and is so needed today.

The story follows Central West End Farm extending a helping hand to an impoverished community by growing a healthy abundance of crops. Their work helps eliminate hunger for the less fortunate of St. Louis, aids community bonding and provides education for children in a lovely outdoor environment. The camera work is very well done, with a variety of shots and camera angles. I don't feel this is quite memorable enough to be enjoyed at a film festival although the topic is certainly relevant. While the subject is centered on kindness and community and its importance, it is not unique in its approach.

As a documentary, I give it props for the variety of speakers and locations. There is a variety of active dialogue representing young and old alike. It's great to hear real people talking about their personal experiences; it just lacks pizzazz. It is definitely accurate and educational, and gives insight into real issues and how problems are solved. The background sound is very lack luster and repetitive. Also, there are some scenes when the audio has an odd echo. At other times, the music swells inappropriately, making the dialogue difficult to hear. However, the visuals are very good and the camera work is crisp, focused and professional.

The crowing jewel of this film are the lessons is teaches about poverty, hunger, community and service. Many young children don't know about the benefits of community gardens, if they even know about them at all. It certainly encourages the viewer to truly understand where hunger stems from, and how to help combat it in their own communities. I love seeing the lush gardens and the process of planting seeds, tending and harvesting nutritious food for the community of St. Louis, where hunger and poverty can be rampant. The Farm does its part to feed people in need and educating young children about what they can do to make their city a better place. This is a feel good film.

I give Growing for Good 3.5 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 8 to 12, plus adults. Reviewed by Cassidy S., KIDS FIRST! Juror

Growing for Good is a 15-minute documentary film that spotlights the efforts of urban farmers Arthur and Nancy Culbert, who planted the initial seed that became the Central West End Farm in St. Louis. Their mission is to eliminate hunger within their own community by growing organic vegetables and fruit for members of local food pantries. They also partner with a neighborhood elementary school giving students the opportunity to plant and harvest fresh produce for people in need.
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