Watch Kids' Reviews of
ATARI

What to know: Simple, yet beautifully tailored film that kids will relate to.
ATARI is in the KIDS FIRST! Film Festival - it may not be a regular, endorsed title
Recommended age 5-18
15 minutes
VIDEO
SABA HAMZAVIAN
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ATARI is in the KIDS FIRST! Film Festival - it may not be a regular, endorsed title
Farhad Fadakar's portrayal of Iran is very different from the traditional Western image. All of the settings in this film are beautiful! Mosques, mud-brick buildings, the Iranian countryside, roadside shops and even signs congratulating politicians for being elected to the Qanat Council (the group of people who oversee the management of the UNESCO-certified Persian qanat irrigation system). Wow!

The music perfectly underscores the actions of the main characters - slower, elevator-style music for scenic panoramas and suspenseful, deeper tracks for eventful sequences enhance the viewing experience. Farhad Fadakar is the director, writer and producer of Atari. The actors are not named. However, every member of the crew and cast truly perform outstandingly in their individual roles. The main character, despite not showing too many overt emotions as is consistent with Western theatre, skillfully acts his part. Fadakar shines in the production department; his cinematography and the way all of the shots blend together show his prowess. One thing that I noticed: one of the characters says that men don't cry, a saying which is slightly emotionally insensitive and stereotypical. But I think that's the only major red flag I noticed. I love the scenes in the Iranian village! The mud-brick buildings, dark passageways and ethos of Persian culture all contribute to making Atari a wonderful short. The message is "being grateful for the things you have is better than pining for the things you don't."

I give Atari 4 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 5 to 18. Atari has a great plot, above average cinematography, and is overall a superb film for younger kids to watch! It would be particularly suitable for a venue wanting to show films that address Iranian or Arabic culture. Reviewed by Eshaan M., KIDS FIRST! Film Critic

Atari is a simple yet beautifully tailored film that kids will love. Though the color correction makes the film murky and grey, Atari's plot and moral make up for this. Atari follows a boy in an Iranian town who really wants an Atari. His father promises that he will buy him an Atari on his pilgrimage to Mecca, where the video game is far cheaper. But several challenges ensue, and the boy realizes the value of being grateful for what he has, rather than pining for what he wants.

The storyline might be simplistic, or what some would consider a template-plot, but the lead actor (unnamed) executes each part of the story convincingly. This short film has a resounding lesson that is clearly delivered. The variety of shots in Atari is awesome; the one thing that I noticed that is a bit odd is the color correction. It seems to be toned to grayscale in all but one or two scenes, and that undermine the beautiful storyline, settings and emotions being felt. Even in happy moments, the grey screen takes away some of the joy the viewer feels for the main character. That being said, I especially like the shots where the main character looks down into the game room where other kids are playing on their Atari or SEGA consoles.

All of the clothes the characters in this film wear (t-shirts, jeans, chadors and hijabs) fit the time period and storyline of Atari. The setting for this film is super unique and adds so much to the movie. Farhad Fadakar's portrayal of Iran is very different from the traditional Western image. All of the settings in this film are beautiful! Mosques, mud-brick buildings, the Iranian countryside, roadside shops and even signs congratulating politicians for being elected to the Qanat Council (the group of people who oversee the management of the UNESCO-certified Persian qanat irrigation system). Wow!

The music perfectly underscores the actions of the main characters - slower, elevator-style music for scenic panoramas and suspenseful, deeper tracks for eventful sequences enhance the viewing experience. Farhad Fadakar is the director, writer and producer of Atari. The actors are not named. However, every member of the crew and cast truly perform outstandingly in their individual roles. The main character, despite not showing too many overt emotions as is consistent with Western theatre, skillfully acts his part. Fadakar shines in the production department; his cinematography and the way all of the shots blend together show his prowess. One thing that I noticed: one of the characters says that men don't cry, a saying which is slightly emotionally insensitive and stereotypical. But I think that's the only major red flag I noticed. I love the scenes in the Iranian village! The mud-brick buildings, dark passageways and ethos of Persian culture all contribute to making Atari a wonderful short. The message is "being grateful for the things you have is better than pining for the things you don't."

I give Atari 4 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 5 to 18. Atari has a great plot, above average cinematography, and is overall a superb film for younger kids to watch! It would be particularly suitable for a venue wanting to show films that address Iranian or Arabic culture. Reviewed by Eshaan M., KIDS FIRST! Film Critic

The story is about a teenage boy that his father promised him an Atari...
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