Watch Kids' Reviews of
NO INTERNET

What to know: Very appealing.
NO INTERNET is in the KIDS FIRST! Film Festival - it may not be a regular, endorsed title
Recommended age 10-18
26 minutes
VIDEO
KYLE LAWRENCE
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NO INTERNET is in the KIDS FIRST! Film Festival - it may not be a regular, endorsed title
The high production quality and intriguing storyline make No Internet a very appealing film. This Canadian short seems like it could easily evolve into a Hollywood-grade movie!

It's just been announced: a small town in Canada has decided to go an entire year without the internet or cellular data. A group of teens decide to sleuth out exactly why this is happening, and find a nefarious Neo-Luddist group pulling the strings of this operation.

The idea itself is quite interesting to explore and the setting, a first-world country, makes this idea even more unique. We've seen films where underdeveloped countries don't have the internet, but to think that a town in a country like Canada would go to these measures is interesting. I also like that No Internet ends on a bit of a cliffhanger note, but wish that there would be a bit more of development to the story at the end. It seems a bit too unresolved.

The cinematography in this film is absolutely breathtaking - I love how stable the motion shots are (when the characters are biking around town) and how dynamic the lighting is in each shot, especially those shot in the science lab. The camera work really adds to this film! No Internet is set in a Canadian town and filmed in parts of Vancouver. The setting is beautiful with lush forests, large homes and a serene feeling that provides refreshing break from its fast-paced plot.

The music is a mix of suspenseful, dark tunes and cinematic, melancholy harmonies. The music hinges on the scene it plays in and thereby drives the action perfectly. The sound effects in this film are mainly during scenes where the villains are devising plans in their high-tech lab. They perfectly fit the sci-fi aura of the scenes. There are some special effects which help round out the film's realism; the 'no internet' graphic on the characters' computers is computer-generated, as is the entirety of the villains' lab. These are effective and quite believable.

Kyle Lawrence is the director, writer and producer of No Internet. His direction and production skills shine above all. Hunter Dillon and Miles Reed play Zach and James Parker, Jarrett Lynch plays Mateo, Hope Vissia plays Kaitlyn, Trey Foreman plays Ethan, and Cedric Ducharme plays Brody. The Parker brothers are unique characters with a special dynamic between them - rocky at times, but solid and loving overall. Dillon and Reed excel in these roles and their brotherly chemistry definitely works! Besides these characters, Jarrett Lynch puts on an incredible performance as the mysterious Mateo - all of the cast are skilled at emoting, but he's the best of all. I found the scene where the Parker brothers sort out their emotions to be (and this is something few can do well) emotionally touching and actually not that over-the-top. The scene is shot effectively, with realistic dialogue and emotions.

There's not an overarching moral message, but I suppose one could interpret this short film as telling kids that we've become really reliant on technology in the 21st century, and that the world doesn't end when we lose Wi-Fi.

I give No Internet 4 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 10 to 18. It has awesome cinematography, superb performances, and a unique plot idea. It would make a great addition to any festival focused on stories about technology and how it affects the lives we live. Reviewed by Eshaan M., KIDS FIRST! Film Critic

The high production quality and intriguing storyline make No Internet a very appealing film. This Canadian short seems like it could easily evolve into a Hollywood-grade movie!

It's just been announced: a small town in Canada has decided to go an entire year without the internet or cellular data. A group of teens decide to sleuth out exactly why this is happening, and find a nefarious Neo-Luddist group pulling the strings of this operation.

The idea itself is quite interesting to explore and the setting, a first-world country, makes this idea even more unique. We've seen films where underdeveloped countries don't have the internet, but to think that a town in a country like Canada would go to these measures is interesting. I also like that No Internet ends on a bit of a cliffhanger note, but wish that there would be a bit more of development to the story at the end. It seems a bit too unresolved.

The cinematography in this film is absolutely breathtaking - I love how stable the motion shots are (when the characters are biking around town) and how dynamic the lighting is in each shot, especially those shot in the science lab. The camera work really adds to this film! No Internet is set in a Canadian town and filmed in parts of Vancouver. The setting is beautiful with lush forests, large homes and a serene feeling that provides refreshing break from its fast-paced plot.

The music is a mix of suspenseful, dark tunes and cinematic, melancholy harmonies. The music hinges on the scene it plays in and thereby drives the action perfectly. The sound effects in this film are mainly during scenes where the villains are devising plans in their high-tech lab. They perfectly fit the sci-fi aura of the scenes. There are some special effects which help round out the film's realism; the 'no internet' graphic on the characters' computers is computer-generated, as is the entirety of the villains' lab. These are effective and quite believable.

Kyle Lawrence is the director, writer and producer of No Internet. His direction and production skills shine above all. Hunter Dillon and Miles Reed play Zach and James Parker, Jarrett Lynch plays Mateo, Hope Vissia plays Kaitlyn, Trey Foreman plays Ethan, and Cedric Ducharme plays Brody. The Parker brothers are unique characters with a special dynamic between them - rocky at times, but solid and loving overall. Dillon and Reed excel in these roles and their brotherly chemistry definitely works! Besides these characters, Jarrett Lynch puts on an incredible performance as the mysterious Mateo - all of the cast are skilled at emoting, but he's the best of all. I found the scene where the Parker brothers sort out their emotions to be (and this is something few can do well) emotionally touching and actually not that over-the-top. The scene is shot effectively, with realistic dialogue and emotions.

There's not an overarching moral message, but I suppose one could interpret this short film as telling kids that we've become really reliant on technology in the 21st century, and that the world doesn't end when we lose Wi-Fi.

I give No Internet 4 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 10 to 18. It has awesome cinematography, superb performances, and a unique plot idea. It would make a great addition to any festival focused on stories about technology and how it affects the lives we live. Reviewed by Eshaan M., KIDS FIRST! Film Critic

A group of teens have to go an entire year without the internet. They discover there's a clandestine organization pulling the strings and it's up to them to save their town.
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