Watch Kids' Reviews of
FOUR THIRTY

What to know:
KIDS FIRST ENDORSED FOUR THIRTY is in the KIDS FIRST! Film Festival - it may not be a regular, endorsed title
Recommended age 12-16
10 minutes
VIDEO
MARIANELA DIAZ ROMAN
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FOUR THIRTY cover image
What appeals to me the most about Four Thirty (Las Cuartro Y Media) is the storyline. The moral is simple and perfectly relatable for young people. Something that is lacking for me is plot development. When the two children get caught, I did not feel much empathy for them, because the stakes are not high enough. We don't know enough about the back-story of these children or their dad.

The storyline follows two friends, Lucio and Manuel, hanging out at a sleepover. Lucio calls Manuel a chicken because he's scared when watching a movie, so Manuel tries to prove to Lucio that he isn't a chicken.

The relationship between Lucio and Manuel is well established. They seem to be good friends as things do not feel awkward between them. For example, they're comfortable sitting in a room in silence watching a movie together. On the other hand, the father's reaction seems a bit off. I expected him to explode or start a fight with Lucio like he did with the man driving the car. The camera work is quite good. One angle in particular that I like is where the camera is placed at the height of the ground. We see the man whose car was hit by the wet paper ball step out, but only see his shoes. This makes him seem ominous and creates a foreboding feeling that lingers before he is revealed. This angle also makes the viewer feel small and more inferior to the man in the car. The two key influencers in the film are Lucio and Manuel. The two play off of each other very well. Lucio comes off as the cool guy. He seems to keep his emotions hidden and portrays himself with a tough exterior. Manuel, on the other hand, seems to be more timid and weaker. This creates a dynamic distinction between the two. I like when Manuel decides to show the adults that he and Lucio threw the wet paper towel balls.

The messages of the film are: other people's portrayal of you should not affect your behavior, stay true to yourself, anybody has the capability of doing the right thing and following their own path. You should know that it does contain some mild profanity between the two adults when they have a scuffle outside. There is also some disrespect for people's property.

I give this film 3 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 12 to 16, due to the profanity. Adults will enjoy it as well. Reviewed by Tor F., KIDS FIRST! Juror

What appeals to me the most about Four Thirty (Las Cuartro Y Media) is the storyline. The moral is simple and perfectly relatable for young people. Something that is lacking for me is plot development. When the two children get caught, I did not feel much empathy for them, because the stakes are not high enough. We don't know enough about the back-story of these children or their dad.

The storyline follows two friends, Lucio and Manuel, hanging out at a sleepover. Lucio calls Manuel a chicken because he's scared when watching a movie, so Manuel tries to prove to Lucio that he isn't a chicken.

The relationship between Lucio and Manuel is well established. They seem to be good friends as things do not feel awkward between them. For example, they're comfortable sitting in a room in silence watching a movie together. On the other hand, the father's reaction seems a bit off. I expected him to explode or start a fight with Lucio like he did with the man driving the car. The camera work is quite good. One angle in particular that I like is where the camera is placed at the height of the ground. We see the man whose car was hit by the wet paper ball step out, but only see his shoes. This makes him seem ominous and creates a foreboding feeling that lingers before he is revealed. This angle also makes the viewer feel small and more inferior to the man in the car. The two key influencers in the film are Lucio and Manuel. The two play off of each other very well. Lucio comes off as the cool guy. He seems to keep his emotions hidden and portrays himself with a tough exterior. Manuel, on the other hand, seems to be more timid and weaker. This creates a dynamic distinction between the two. I like when Manuel decides to show the adults that he and Lucio threw the wet paper towel balls.

The messages of the film are: other people's portrayal of you should not affect your behavior, stay true to yourself, anybody has the capability of doing the right thing and following their own path. You should know that it does contain some mild profanity between the two adults when they have a scuffle outside. There is also some disrespect for people's property.

I give this film 3 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 12 to 16, due to the profanity. Adults will enjoy it as well. Reviewed by Tor F., KIDS FIRST! Juror

Manuel and Lucio are friends; however, Lucio always mocks Manuel and calls him a chicken. One early morning, Lucio challenges Manuel to show his courage by throwing wet toilet paper balls to the passing cars from the terrace without awaking Lucio's father. When a car stops violently and the passenger couple looks for the guilty person, the funny situation gets out of control.
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