Watch Kids' Reviews of
BAMBOO HAT, THE

What to know:
BAMBOO HAT, THE is in the KIDS FIRST! Film Festival - it may not be a regular, endorsed title
Recommended age 12-18
88 minutes
FeatureFilm
CECILIA LI
Listen to reviews on our radio show Listen to KIDS FIRST! Radio Coming Attractions on VoiceAmerica
BAMBOO HAT, THE cover image
The Bamboo Hat is a heartwarming tale that makes viewers want to give their grandmother a big hug. The film is beautifully touching and tragic as it reveals the development of the love between a grandson and his grandmother. So much Chinese culture is ingrained in this movie, while not overloading for foreign audiences. In rural China, a grandmother keeps the disappearance of her son from her grandson, Huolong, while he learns the importance of family. Through sadness, anger and devotion, the pair bonds as Huolong waits for his father to return home.

The story is incredibly moving as Huolong and his grandmother grow ever closer. Initially, Huolong is angry and withholding, but eventually, he learns to accept and appreciate his grandmother, though she keeps the news of his father a secret. I love Huolong's characterization as a rowdy and emotional, but overall good kid, and how that plays against his grandmother who is calm, compassionate, and determined.

The cinematography is incredible beautiful, from the close-ups that capture the intimate family bonding to the wide angle shots display the stunning farms and rivers. The scenes showing Huolong running through the farms are very appealing. The grandmother's attire is beautiful, while retaining the simplicity of farmer's clothing. The locations are beautiful and show American audiences the unfamiliar geography of China's stunning river basins. The landscapes have an appealing aesthetic, as do the stone and wood of the houses.

The music perfectly captures the sad and sentimental tone of the scenes. When the narrator describes the story of the gods, the music sweeps the audience into the story. The upbeat music emphasizes Huolong's playful personality, while the soft, wistful woodwind music helps convey the grandmother's calm and wisdom. The sounds of the cello force your eyes to well as the grandmother cries, worried about her son and grandson.

Every actor performs beautifully, but Yanshu Wu, as the grandmother, stands out. She expresses the emotions that any grandmother would feel from her frustration to her remorse and her love. This film will play well on a big screen.

The message is that family is the most valuable thing in the world. It's important to value and appreciate our family and all they do for us. The lesson behind the story hits home with me personally, because growing up in an Asian American family, I also have had to learn the importance of family that is so valued in Asian culture. It contains some profanity. I can't say anything about the profanity in Mandarin, but the subtitles do possess some minor language. This film made me want to learn more about my own Chinese culture and native language. I'm also captivated by the stories of the Chinese gods that are referenced throughout the film. My favorite part is the bonding of Huolong and his grandmother. It reminds me of my own relationship with my grandmother, and how important that is. The actress Yanshu Wu is well known, although she is mainly recognized in China rather than the US.

I give The Bamboo Hat 5 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 12 to 18, plus adults. You should know that the dialogue is in Mandarin Chinese with English subtitles. Reviewed by Abigail L., KIDS FIRST! Film Critic

The Bamboo Hat is a heartwarming tale that makes viewers want to give their grandmother a big hug. The film is beautifully touching and tragic as it reveals the development of the love between a grandson and his grandmother. So much Chinese culture is ingrained in this movie, while not overloading for foreign audiences. In rural China, a grandmother keeps the disappearance of her son from her grandson, Huolong, while he learns the importance of family. Through sadness, anger and devotion, the pair bonds as Huolong waits for his father to return home.

The story is incredibly moving as Huolong and his grandmother grow ever closer. Initially, Huolong is angry and withholding, but eventually, he learns to accept and appreciate his grandmother, though she keeps the news of his father a secret. I love Huolong's characterization as a rowdy and emotional, but overall good kid, and how that plays against his grandmother who is calm, compassionate, and determined.

The cinematography is incredible beautiful, from the close-ups that capture the intimate family bonding to the wide angle shots display the stunning farms and rivers. The scenes showing Huolong running through the farms are very appealing. The grandmother's attire is beautiful, while retaining the simplicity of farmer's clothing. The locations are beautiful and show American audiences the unfamiliar geography of China's stunning river basins. The landscapes have an appealing aesthetic, as do the stone and wood of the houses.

The music perfectly captures the sad and sentimental tone of the scenes. When the narrator describes the story of the gods, the music sweeps the audience into the story. The upbeat music emphasizes Huolong's playful personality, while the soft, wistful woodwind music helps convey the grandmother's calm and wisdom. The sounds of the cello force your eyes to well as the grandmother cries, worried about her son and grandson.

Every actor performs beautifully, but Yanshu Wu, as the grandmother, stands out. She expresses the emotions that any grandmother would feel from her frustration to her remorse and her love. This film will play well on a big screen.

The message is that family is the most valuable thing in the world. It's important to value and appreciate our family and all they do for us. The lesson behind the story hits home with me personally, because growing up in an Asian American family, I also have had to learn the importance of family that is so valued in Asian culture. It contains some profanity. I can't say anything about the profanity in Mandarin, but the subtitles do possess some minor language. This film made me want to learn more about my own Chinese culture and native language. I'm also captivated by the stories of the Chinese gods that are referenced throughout the film. My favorite part is the bonding of Huolong and his grandmother. It reminds me of my own relationship with my grandmother, and how important that is. The actress Yanshu Wu is well known, although she is mainly recognized in China rather than the US.

I give The Bamboo Hat 5 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 12 to 18, plus adults. You should know that the dialogue is in Mandarin Chinese with English subtitles. Reviewed by Abigail L., KIDS FIRST! Film Critic

t in Guangxi China, "The Bamboo Hat" is a tender heartwarming story about a grandma-grandson bond that has to withstand the ravages of time, fate and truths. Through his grandmother's boundless patience and devotion, seven-year-old Huolong learns to embrace empathy, humility and the importance of family. The movie puts a spotlight on the left-behind children who live with other family members in the countryside of China.
You too can become a film critic!
KIDS FIRST! Goes Local: Submit a review & win!

NEW SEARCH
Kid movie news & Free DVDs:
Join KIDS FIRST! on Twitter Join KIDS FIRST! on YouTube Join KIDS FIRST! on Instagram Join KIDS FIRST! on Facebook Join KIDS FIRST! on Pinterest