Watch Kids' Reviews of
ADNAN

What to know: A short, yet impactful tearjerker that will ake a massive impact on its viewers.
ADNAN is in the KIDS FIRST! Film Festival - it may not be a regular, endorsed title
Recommended age 12-18
15 minutes
VIDEO
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Adnan is short, yet impactful tearjerker that will surely leave a massive impact on its viewers. With an incredible and experienced cast (but not in the conventional sense), seamless editing and a unique theme, this film is a great way for kids to learn about the Syrian conflict through the eyes of a refugee.

Adnan is a young Syrian refugee who sought asylum with his mother in Britain after his family was killed in Aleppo. His mother suffers from post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and believes that she lost Adnan too, even when he is right in front of her. Adnan must resort to his artistic skills to help his mother remember their journey and remember him or risk losing her forever.

I love every element of this film. The majority of the dialogue is in Arabic and the script is written from the perspective of a refugee, with strong emotions. Thus, the film delivers its authenticity. Adnan is truly an emotional rollercoaster that gives you an insider's perspective on the journey that refugees take and the pain they bear.

The camera work in Adnan fit the tone of the story very well; dark shots when describing Aleppo, and with light in scenes in the UK. The speed of the shots also changes throughout the film. My favorite scene is when Adnan's mother breaks through her PTSD and hugs Adnan for the first time. The radiant light from the upper corners of the frame and the shot in itself combine to make an incredible scene. The film was shot in the UK, with Adnan's art structures serving as a secondary location (Syria). There's not much shot outside of Adnan's home, which seems small in some shots and large in others - though that may just be movie magic. The sets and locations are rather inconsequential; the story really pulls viewers in.

The music is one of my favorite parts of the film. In many scenes, one can tell that the music was a deliberate choice to help add depth to the scene. At one point, Adnan tries to remind his mother of the stormy seas and rough boat ride they took by singing an Arabic song, which his mother repeats in the last scene. First off, that's a great callback, and secondly, a unique choice that helps add authenticity. The music drives the action in other scenes in the film. When Adnan runs to the craft store and is in 'art creation mode,' the music is fast-paced and crescendos. In other scenes that are more melancholy, the music slows and the volume is a little lower.

Steven Chatterton and Mark Arrigo are the directors of this film, and they made sure that every piece of the puzzle was immaculately placed together. Arrigo also helped Steven Chatterton in the script-writing process. Julia Taylor-Stanley and Tiernan Hanby are the producers, who masterfully crafted each element of the film. Ayham Kabi, a refugee himself, plays the role of Adnan in this short film. His own experience really makes the acting even more powerful and poignant. Zaynah, Adnan's mother, is played by Raghad Chaar, whose subtle, nuanced acting is also believable and well-done. I believe the cast stands out the most in this film.

Adnan portrays refugees in a new light, removing the third-person and using actual refugee actors as the cast. It promotes a message of choosing love over division and animosity. I love the character of Adnan. He truly wants to help his mother and is independent and strong through her battle with PTSD.

I give Adnan 5 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 13 to 18, plus adults. This is truly a beautiful film and would be enriching for kids to view at a youth and family film festival. Reviewed by Eshaan M., KIDS FIRST! Film Critic

Adnan is short, yet impactful tearjerker that will surely leave a massive impact on its viewers. With an incredible and experienced cast (but not in the conventional sense), seamless editing and a unique theme, this film is a great way for kids to learn about the Syrian conflict through the eyes of a refugee.

Adnan is a young Syrian refugee who sought asylum with his mother in Britain after his family was killed in Aleppo. His mother suffers from post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and believes that she lost Adnan too, even when he is right in front of her. Adnan must resort to his artistic skills to help his mother remember their journey and remember him or risk losing her forever.

I love every element of this film. The majority of the dialogue is in Arabic and the script is written from the perspective of a refugee, with strong emotions. Thus, the film delivers its authenticity. Adnan is truly an emotional rollercoaster that gives you an insider's perspective on the journey that refugees take and the pain they bear.

The camera work in Adnan fit the tone of the story very well; dark shots when describing Aleppo, and with light in scenes in the UK. The speed of the shots also changes throughout the film. My favorite scene is when Adnan's mother breaks through her PTSD and hugs Adnan for the first time. The radiant light from the upper corners of the frame and the shot in itself combine to make an incredible scene. The film was shot in the UK, with Adnan's art structures serving as a secondary location (Syria). There's not much shot outside of Adnan's home, which seems small in some shots and large in others - though that may just be movie magic. The sets and locations are rather inconsequential; the story really pulls viewers in.

The music is one of my favorite parts of the film. In many scenes, one can tell that the music was a deliberate choice to help add depth to the scene. At one point, Adnan tries to remind his mother of the stormy seas and rough boat ride they took by singing an Arabic song, which his mother repeats in the last scene. First off, that's a great callback, and secondly, a unique choice that helps add authenticity. The music drives the action in other scenes in the film. When Adnan runs to the craft store and is in 'art creation mode,' the music is fast-paced and crescendos. In other scenes that are more melancholy, the music slows and the volume is a little lower.

Steven Chatterton and Mark Arrigo are the directors of this film, and they made sure that every piece of the puzzle was immaculately placed together. Arrigo also helped Steven Chatterton in the script-writing process. Julia Taylor-Stanley and Tiernan Hanby are the producers, who masterfully crafted each element of the film. Ayham Kabi, a refugee himself, plays the role of Adnan in this short film. His own experience really makes the acting even more powerful and poignant. Zaynah, Adnan's mother, is played by Raghad Chaar, whose subtle, nuanced acting is also believable and well-done. I believe the cast stands out the most in this film.

Adnan portrays refugees in a new light, removing the third-person and using actual refugee actors as the cast. It promotes a message of choosing love over division and animosity. I love the character of Adnan. He truly wants to help his mother and is independent and strong through her battle with PTSD.

I give Adnan 5 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 13 to 18, plus adults. This is truly a beautiful film and would be enriching for kids to view at a youth and family film festival. Reviewed by Eshaan M., KIDS FIRST! Film Critic

Ten year old Adnan has fled Syria with his mother after their family were killed and their neighborhood destroyed. Now settled in the UK, he must use all his creativity to break through her PTSD or risk losing her forever.
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