Watch Kids' Reviews of
FAIRY GODMOTHER'S APPRENTICE

What to know: Interesting storyline enhanced by many fantasy elements and plot twists.
FAIRY GODMOTHER
Recommended age 9-15
21 minutes
VIDEO
LESLIE BLOOM
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FAIRY GODMOTHER
The Fairy Godmother's Apprentice is a film that mixes fantasy and twists to present a storyline in a creative and entertaining way. The production and acting in the film are very good and it seems like the overall series touches many themes that are relevant for children, teenagers and even adults. This entry is one episode of a series, so there are many elements that are unexplained and there are some situations that are introduced in this episode, but are never developed. The overall storyline is explained, but even then, there are many questions that are not answered in this episode. So, it does not stand along well.

Henry has a peculiar life. He lost his mom and has a lot of issues about her. He lives with his Nana and lacks social skills that enable him to relate to others, such as his neighbor, little Becca. Eventually, he discovers a family secret and he has to decide how to use it and how to grow as a person.

The storyline is interesting and is enhanced by many fantasy elements and twists. I would be concerned that that there are many parts of the story that lack background stories. This particular episode does not show us why Henry went to live with his Nana, why he has such a negative perspective of the world and why he does not like Becca, yet he babysits her. There are more things that are not explained. In this episode discovers his powers and yet, we never get to see what happens or what he does with them. This is part of a television series, so it makes sense that not everything is wrapped up in a tidy way and, it may just inspires kids to watch the rest of the series.

The camera work is very well done with lots of changes in perspective and capturing each location in great detail. The locations range from school settings, home, parks, streets and neighborhoods. All of them are colorful and well designed. I love the use of color in this film. There are scenes where the contrasts between colors really make the whole thing to stand out. The only memorable costume is when Nana uses her powers and reveals herself as Henry's fairy godmother. The visual effects enhance every time magic occurs with sparks, movement and magic sprinkles. The key characters are Henry, Becca and Henry's Nana, played by Teddy Van Ee, Lucia Ridao-Moore and Anita Sorel (in the same order). Henry and Becca stand out the most, at least in this episode, as the storyline revolves around them and their experiences. The actors all give believable performances. Teddy Van Ee captures even the little details and gestures that many adolescents do when they are frustrated or annoyed, and he does it in a way that it does not seem forced at all. The acting is great, and the storyline is very engaging, but I love the visual complements. There is a scene where Nana is helping two customers that love the color blue, and watching all those tones of blue is both fun and satisfyingly to look at.

The message of the overall series tries to show how dealing with our past can really open our future. There are situations that we experience that are unpleasant, but perhaps their purpose is to learn a lesson that will help others deal with a similar situation sometime in the future. Another recurrent theme of the film is the importance of family.

I give The Fairy Godmother's Apprentice 3.5 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 9 to 15, plus adults. While this film has great production and acting, keep in mind that it is one episode from a series. Is a very entertaining show about family and dealing with one's fears and past. Reviewed by David O., KIDS FIRST! Juror

The Fairy Godmother's Apprentice is a film that mixes fantasy and twists to present a storyline in a creative and entertaining way. The production and acting in the film are very good and it seems like the overall series touches many themes that are relevant for children, teenagers and even adults. This entry is one episode of a series, so there are many elements that are unexplained and there are some situations that are introduced in this episode, but are never developed. The overall storyline is explained, but even then, there are many questions that are not answered in this episode. So, it does not stand along well.

Henry has a peculiar life. He lost his mom and has a lot of issues about her. He lives with his Nana and lacks social skills that enable him to relate to others, such as his neighbor, little Becca. Eventually, he discovers a family secret and he has to decide how to use it and how to grow as a person.

The storyline is interesting and is enhanced by many fantasy elements and twists. I would be concerned that that there are many parts of the story that lack background stories. This particular episode does not show us why Henry went to live with his Nana, why he has such a negative perspective of the world and why he does not like Becca, yet he babysits her. There are more things that are not explained. In this episode discovers his powers and yet, we never get to see what happens or what he does with them. This is part of a television series, so it makes sense that not everything is wrapped up in a tidy way and, it may just inspires kids to watch the rest of the series.

The camera work is very well done with lots of changes in perspective and capturing each location in great detail. The locations range from school settings, home, parks, streets and neighborhoods. All of them are colorful and well designed. I love the use of color in this film. There are scenes where the contrasts between colors really make the whole thing to stand out. The only memorable costume is when Nana uses her powers and reveals herself as Henry's fairy godmother. The visual effects enhance every time magic occurs with sparks, movement and magic sprinkles. The key characters are Henry, Becca and Henry's Nana, played by Teddy Van Ee, Lucia Ridao-Moore and Anita Sorel (in the same order). Henry and Becca stand out the most, at least in this episode, as the storyline revolves around them and their experiences. The actors all give believable performances. Teddy Van Ee captures even the little details and gestures that many adolescents do when they are frustrated or annoyed, and he does it in a way that it does not seem forced at all. The acting is great, and the storyline is very engaging, but I love the visual complements. There is a scene where Nana is helping two customers that love the color blue, and watching all those tones of blue is both fun and satisfyingly to look at.

The message of the overall series tries to show how dealing with our past can really open our future. There are situations that we experience that are unpleasant, but perhaps their purpose is to learn a lesson that will help others deal with a similar situation sometime in the future. Another recurrent theme of the film is the importance of family.

I give The Fairy Godmother's Apprentice 3.5 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 9 to 15, plus adults. While this film has great production and acting, keep in mind that it is one episode from a series. Is a very entertaining show about family and dealing with one's fears and past. Reviewed by David O., KIDS FIRST! Juror

Henry Summers has more angst than the average teenager. He doesn't know his father, and his mother spent her entire life trying to save everyone but him, and now she's dead with nothing to show for it.

One thing might cheer him up, though: ruining his neighbor's Spring Break Restoration Project. Her name is Becca and yes, she's 10 years old. Okay, yes, that is eight years younger than him. But yes, she's a typical do-gooder, like his mother was, and it brings a smile to his face when her hopes are properly dashed.

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