For revenge, Emma and her friends play an elaborate prank that makes the boys believe they are being haunted. It works and sends the tough boys running home, screaming. Only Edwin isn't running or screaming. He's missing.

Edwin has managed to dream himself to another world and a city made of circus tents. There he finds the inhabitants aren't human, but animal-like.

Edwin befriends a dragon and become the dragon trainer.

At home, Emma's family is in distress because the police have given up. But Emma never gives up and starts having strange dreams where she sees Edwin with the dragon.

Just when Edwin gets into trouble and has to flee the big tent, Emma dreams herself there and is captured. But Emma is a fighter and escapes her cage. The twins are reunited.

They decide to rescue the dragon. Turns out the dragon is also out of place and is just a baby. Everything doesn't go quite smoothly, but the twins manage to take the dragon to his home and get back home themselves. - KIDS FIRST! Reviews and Videos" />

Watch Kids' Reviews of
SPENCER, 1928

What to know: It's 1928 and Edwin's birthday.
SPENCER, 1928 is in the KIDS FIRST! Film Festival - it may not be a regular, endorsed title
Recommended age 12-18
101 minutes
Screenplay
VERONICA TABARES
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SPENCER, 1928 cover image
Myth has a tendency to embrace lessons and our understanding of the world. This script has a strong mythical element as travel to another universe suggests. The locations, designs, costumes, potential for visual storytelling in more than one media are enormous. The writer has taken a fantasy and blended it well with a seemingly simple family whose young son had disappeared. The family has secrets, which the young sister, his twin, intuitively knows and they, with determination, help her find her brother, sensing that he is in an unknown universe. They sense each other; she sees him on a dragon; he sees her searching. They connect emotionally. This connection becomes physical when she enters his universe, becoming very inventive in doing so. They work together; outsmarting the malicious circus Ringmaster of the new universe, finding the den for the sad stolen dragon, the home for a child and a little girl lost. Together the twins return home on the wings of a grateful master dragon. Upon their return and telling their story, the parents' secrets are revealed. The family becomes more unified in the truth about themselves and their acceptance and love for one another. The story is told boldly, with humor, color, surprise and multiple barriers to overcome - all in the service of traveling home. I give this 5 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages to 18, plus adults. Reviewed by Juror #11.
Myth has a tendency to embrace lessons and our understanding of the world. This script has a strong mythical element as travel to another universe suggests. The locations, designs, costumes, potential for visual storytelling in more than one media are enormous. The writer has taken a fantasy and blended it well with a seemingly simple family whose young son had disappeared. The family has secrets, which the young sister, his twin, intuitively knows and they, with determination, help her find her brother, sensing that he is in an unknown universe. They sense each other; she sees him on a dragon; he sees her searching. They connect emotionally. This connection becomes physical when she enters his universe, becoming very inventive in doing so. They work together; outsmarting the malicious circus Ringmaster of the new universe, finding the den for the sad stolen dragon, the home for a child and a little girl lost. Together the twins return home on the wings of a grateful master dragon. Upon their return and telling their story, the parents' secrets are revealed. The family becomes more unified in the truth about themselves and their acceptance and love for one another. The story is told boldly, with humor, color, surprise and multiple barriers to overcome - all in the service of traveling home. I give this 5 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages to 18, plus adults. Reviewed by Juror #11.
It's 1928 and Edwin's birthday. He and his friends are camping out in the backyard to celebrate. This is new for Edwin, who has had trouble making friends at school.

But Emma, Edwin's twin sister, isn't allowed to campout because she's a girl. She's told girls need to stay at home. When she complains to her brother he tells her it's "just how things are" and "boys do, girls watch."

For revenge, Emma and her friends play an elaborate prank that makes the boys believe they are being haunted. It works and sends the tough boys running home, screaming. Only Edwin isn't running or screaming. He's missing.

Edwin has managed to dream himself to another world and a city made of circus tents. There he finds the inhabitants aren't human, but animal-like.

Edwin befriends a dragon and become the dragon trainer.

At home, Emma's family is in distress because the police have given up. But Emma never gives up and starts having strange dreams where she sees Edwin with the dragon.

Just when Edwin gets into trouble and has to flee the big tent, Emma dreams herself there and is captured. But Emma is a fighter and escapes her cage. The twins are reunited.

They decide to rescue the dragon. Turns out the dragon is also out of place and is just a baby. Everything doesn't go quite smoothly, but the twins manage to take the dragon to his home and get back home themselves.

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