KIDS FIRST! has endorsed 253 total Screenplay titles

Below are up to 26 of them

KIDS FIRST! has linked to external websites through which you may order many of the KIDS FIRST! endorsed titles


This title is in the KIDS FIRST! Film Festival - it may not be a regular, endorsed title
UNDER THE SAME SKY
UNDER THE SAME SKY - ANA LAURA CALDERON
Series: FOREIGN SHORT, AGES 8 -12
Description - Andrea (age 4) and Marina (age 6) become fast friends while playing on the rooftops of their adjacent buildings during the pandemic in Mexico City. They cling to their precious friendship amidst the stress and loneliness of confinement. When Marina's parents separate suddenly, however, Marina is heartbroken to have to move away without being able to say goodbye to Andrea, who is equally heartsick until she unexpectedly finds a remnant of their friendship. From Mexico, very little dialogue - in Spanish with English subtitles
KIDS FIRST!® Adult Jurors say - Under The Same Sky is a great reminder of the world that our children experienced during the COVID 19 pandemic.

The story follows two young girls, Andrea (age 4) and Marina (age 6) who become friends during the pandemic while playing on the rooftops of their respective houses.. They fly paper airplanes to each other with pictures on them and should across the space between the buildings to share information. Suddenly, Marina's parents spare and she moves away without notice. Andrea is puzzled and heartsick until she finds a remnant of their friendship.

Beautiful concept, simply made. Very nice camera work and audio. Most of this is non-narrative with minimal language in Spanish, and English subtitles. The two little girls are absolutely adorable. Their movements are so natural and you can feel the connection between them. I love that this takes a look back at how our young ones experienced the pandemic as it will always affect their lives.

The film's message is about friendship, even in the most challenging situations.

I give Under The Same Sky 4 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 8 to 12, plus adults. By Julie S., KIDS FIRST!
KIDS FIRST!® Kid Jurors say - Under The Same Sky is a great reminder of the world that our children experienced during the COVID 19 pandemic.

The story follows two young girls, Andrea (age 4) and Marina (age 6) who become friends during the pandemic while playing on the rooftops of their respective houses.. They fly paper airplanes to each other with pictures on them and should across the space between the buildings to share information. Suddenly, Marina's parents spare and she moves away without notice. Andrea is puzzled and heartsick until she finds a remnant of their friendship.

Beautiful concept, simply made. Very nice camera work and audio. Most of this is non-narrative with minimal language in Spanish, and English subtitles. The two little girls are absolutely adorable. Their movements are so natural and you can feel the connection between them. I love that this takes a look back at how our young ones experienced the pandemic as it will always affect their lives.

The film's message is about friendship, even in the most challenging situations.

I give Under The Same Sky 4 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 8 to 12, plus adults. By Julie S., KIDS FIRST!
Juror Recommended Age: 8-12 Suggested Retail Price: $ Media:



This title is in the KIDS FIRST! Film Festival - it may not be a regular, endorsed title
GLOBAL CLIMATE
GLOBAL CLIMATE - ALAN CHRIEST / POWERSPASH PROJECT
Series: INDIE SHORT, AGES 8-18
Description - We often forget that climate change lessens our opportunities to enjoy this magnificent planet. But common sense remedies are met with extreme resistance. We must insist that politics and economics come together to address necessary changes.
KIDS FIRST!® Adult Jurors say - Global Climate expresses the effects of climate change as well as ideas of solutions for climate change in one short video. This mini documentary focuses on the information while providing beautiful photographs of landscapes, demonstrating how underappreciated our planet truly is.

Global Climate gives an overview of how climate change has already impacted not just humans, but everything on Earth, how it will continue to impact our planet and what we can do to slow the warming climate.

Global Climate is a short video with engaging visuals and an educational message, perfect for families in search for an introduction to climate change. The presentation of the information flows nicely, with each fact making sense with the picture shown and it is clear how each point connects to the broad topic of climate change. The video is a bit short on creativity as it's just text and pictures, but the simplicity does help get the point across. The photographs are beautiful, with views of many different landscapes around the globe. The lighting makes for spectacular pictures. Not only are these pictures pleasant to look at, they convey the film's message that if we don't do something about climate change, these wonderful things that we take for granted could be gone. The locations used are well chosen to match each fact displayed on the screen, contributing to the main idea of Global Climate. There is some instrumental background music that fits the film quite well. The narrator adds to the film at certain points, reading aloud facts that appear onscreen. My favorite part is the images of the landscapes - snowy forests, enormous icy mountains, vast blue oceans and so much more. These locations kept me engaged throughout the entire video.

This documentary expresses how important it is that every person takes actions within their daily lives to fight the warming climate. The desperation of our planet is conveyed by a demonstration of what we have to lose and astonishing facts about climate change.

I give Global Climate 4 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 8 to 18, plus adults. By Kyla C., KIDS FIRST! Film Critic
KIDS FIRST!® Kid Jurors say - Global Climate expresses the effects of climate change as well as ideas of solutions for climate change in one short video. This mini documentary focuses on the information while providing beautiful photographs of landscapes, demonstrating how underappreciated our planet truly is.

Global Climate gives an overview of how climate change has already impacted not just humans, but everything on Earth, how it will continue to impact our planet and what we can do to slow the warming climate.

Global Climate is a short video with engaging visuals and an educational message, perfect for families in search for an introduction to climate change. The presentation of the information flows nicely, with each fact making sense with the picture shown and it is clear how each point connects to the broad topic of climate change. The video is a bit short on creativity as it's just text and pictures, but the simplicity does help get the point across. The photographs are beautiful, with views of many different landscapes around the globe. The lighting makes for spectacular pictures. Not only are these pictures pleasant to look at, they convey the film's message that if we don't do something about climate change, these wonderful things that we take for granted could be gone. The locations used are well chosen to match each fact displayed on the screen, contributing to the main idea of Global Climate. There is some instrumental background music that fits the film quite well. The narrator adds to the film at certain points, reading aloud facts that appear onscreen. My favorite part is the images of the landscapes - snowy forests, enormous icy mountains, vast blue oceans and so much more. These locations kept me engaged throughout the entire video.

This documentary expresses how important it is that every person takes actions within their daily lives to fight the warming climate. The desperation of our planet is conveyed by a demonstration of what we have to lose and astonishing facts about climate change.

I give Global Climate 4 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 8 to 18, plus adults. By Kyla C., KIDS FIRST! Film Critic
Juror Recommended Age: 8-18 Suggested Retail Price: $ Media:



This title is in the KIDS FIRST! Film Festival - it may not be a regular, endorsed title
LEADING STAR, THE
LEADING STAR, THE - TODD LIEN
Series: SCREENPLAY, AGES 12-18
Description - The Life of Aiko, a high school student, after the suicide of her best friend, Chiyo, has taken a 180-degree turn. She moves from her rural town to the city in hopes of leaving the painful memories of her best friend behind. What Aiko doesn't know is that though she has decided to try and move on, her past is still lurking behind - or rather, over- her.
KIDS FIRST!® Adult Jurors say - 'The Leading Star' is a well-conceived, bittersweet short screenplay that skillfully touches on some difficult subjects. It portrays them even-handedly and without judgment, but also without sparing the emotional cost to all involved. As mentioned, the tone intimates the girls' disconnect with their lives and families which, in turn, cranks up the intensity of what they feel for each other. These are big concepts that aren't easily explored in features, but these authors have done a good job wrestling them into this short script. Although this is presumably Akio's story, it is Chiyo who feels like more of the lead because, of course, she is the center of the inciting incident. She is also the controller of the narrative. Chiyo, it seems, has made a series of serious miscalculations. She assumed death would save her from the traumas of life; that it would assuage the painful isolation she feels as a teenager. She also has failed to understand the depth of her connection to Aiko and failed to ponder what affect her death might have on her friend. What she discovers in death is a profound separation, a deafening isolation and an inability to convey the love she now understands and appreciates. Aiko is devastated into numbness. She can't seem to wrap her head around why Chiyo left her and she moves through varying stages of denial, unable to feel her friend's spirit nearby until she returns to the setting of the first scene. We leave her literally and figuratively teetering on the edge. We can presume she follows Chiyo's lead but ... maybe not. As tragic as this story line sounds, and as much as it could serve as a cautionary tale, it is in the end, a rare sort of love story, of devotion between two friends that speaks to the unending connections we have to those present and passed. I give this script 4 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 12 to 18. Reviewed by Juror #10, KIDS FIRST!
KIDS FIRST!® Kid Jurors say - 'The Leading Star' is a well-conceived, bittersweet short screenplay that skillfully touches on some difficult subjects. It portrays them even-handedly and without judgment, but also without sparing the emotional cost to all involved. As mentioned, the tone intimates the girls' disconnect with their lives and families which, in turn, cranks up the intensity of what they feel for each other. These are big concepts that aren't easily explored in features, but these authors have done a good job wrestling them into this short script. Although this is presumably Akio's story, it is Chiyo who feels like more of the lead because, of course, she is the center of the inciting incident. She is also the controller of the narrative. Chiyo, it seems, has made a series of serious miscalculations. She assumed death would save her from the traumas of life; that it would assuage the painful isolation she feels as a teenager. She also has failed to understand the depth of her connection to Aiko and failed to ponder what affect her death might have on her friend. What she discovers in death is a profound separation, a deafening isolation and an inability to convey the love she now understands and appreciates. Aiko is devastated into numbness. She can't seem to wrap her head around why Chiyo left her and she moves through varying stages of denial, unable to feel her friend's spirit nearby until she returns to the setting of the first scene. We leave her literally and figuratively teetering on the edge. We can presume she follows Chiyo's lead but ... maybe not. As tragic as this story line sounds, and as much as it could serve as a cautionary tale, it is in the end, a rare sort of love story, of devotion between two friends that speaks to the unending connections we have to those present and passed. I give this script 4 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 12 to 18. Reviewed by Juror #10, KIDS FIRST!
Juror Recommended Age: 12-18 Suggested Retail Price: $ Media:


This title is in the KIDS FIRST! Film Festival - it may not be a regular, endorsed title
PERSEPHONE
PERSEPHONE - KRISTINA VAN KIRK HOFFMAN
Series: SCREENPLAY, AGES 8-18
Description - Family oriented animated (optional) musical about the Greek myth of Persephone in the Underworld with Hades. Set in ancient Greece, Persephone, the goddess of wheat, longs to create colorful flowers, but her mother forbids it. So Persephone accepts Hades' invitation to grow flowers in the Elysian Fields and all hell breaks out. Story features strong, independent female characters addressing issues of responsibility, creativity, and civic leadership, amid high drama, humor and lively music.
KIDS FIRST!® Adult Jurors say - Persephone is a cleverly conceived and written script with significant potential as an animated feature. The characters are clear and strong and carry their personalities well and the story is a complex one, balancing the tragedy of the coming of the seasons with the celebration of the coming of a young woman's independence. It's humorously written with a splash of parody and a lightly irreverent tone. As both a theatrically produced musical and a musical screenplay, the pacing must depend on the frequency and the emotional expression of the songs. Another run or two through the script will help make other musical opportunities clear. Also check out the "La La Land" script. The use of the children's book at the end might not be necessary. There's something rather heart-rending/warming just watching the snow start to fall around Demeter as Persephone and Hades ride away. Maybe the villagers scurry by busily singing their 'Prepare' song. That also acknowledges an old film writing axiom that a film should end in approximately same scenario as it begins. As mentioned earlier, this version is much more enjoyable than the original. This is a nicely-turned tale with the heart and substance necessary for an animated feature.

I give Persephone 4 out of T stars and recommend it for ages 8 to 18. By Juror #10.
KIDS FIRST!® Kid Jurors say - Persephone is a cleverly conceived and written script with significant potential as an animated feature. The characters are clear and strong and carry their personalities well and the story is a complex one, balancing the tragedy of the coming of the seasons with the celebration of the coming of a young woman's independence. It's humorously written with a splash of parody and a lightly irreverent tone. As both a theatrically produced musical and a musical screenplay, the pacing must depend on the frequency and the emotional expression of the songs. Another run or two through the script will help make other musical opportunities clear. Also check out the "La La Land" script. The use of the children's book at the end might not be necessary. There's something rather heart-rending/warming just watching the snow start to fall around Demeter as Persephone and Hades ride away. Maybe the villagers scurry by busily singing their 'Prepare' song. That also acknowledges an old film writing axiom that a film should end in approximately same scenario as it begins. As mentioned earlier, this version is much more enjoyable than the original. This is a nicely-turned tale with the heart and substance necessary for an animated feature.

I give Persephone 4 out of T stars and recommend it for ages 8 to 18. By Juror #10.
Juror Recommended Age: 8-18 Suggested Retail Price: $ Media:



This title is in the KIDS FIRST! Film Festival - it may not be a regular, endorsed title
WELCOME TO TERRA BLUE
WELCOME TO TERRA BLUE - NANCY ELLIS
Series: SCREENPLAY FOR AGES 8-18
Description - A young girl and her mother, a climatologist, are transported to an alien getaway where they suspect their parents may be hidden after going missing in the Bermuda Triangle. But have they been abducted as well? And for what purpose?
KIDS FIRST!® Adult Jurors say - "Welcome to Terre Blue" welcomes us to a world where we meet aliens of every description - perhaps too many. We learn not to judge those who may seem icky or unattractive to us. We learn that they may love their families; that they may have uncontrolled moments; that they may fear for their jobs; that they may have issues and lives and concerns not so different from our own. This is a profound premise for a story - a story that is relevant to our times, to our humanity. But the art of film making asks us to do more than just tell a story. Hopefully, it asks us to rise to new understandings - perhaps ones that we cannot yet see. It paints worlds that don't yet exist and implies meanings we don't yet understand.

Animation is an art form that allows us to tell/teach the heart stories that are important to us all. Think of "Kung Fu Panda" - how can a fat, untalented, commoner achieve transcendence? Think of "Mulan" and "Moana" and "Brave" where young women find the strength to save their people - and all the other animated features where common people engage internal strengths and external circumstances to achieve happiness - not power - not wealth - not fame. Mere happiness.

This story is a great premise that needs to find more of its heart. Arguably the most important skill in writing children's screenplays is to know how to create emotional content that we can all relate to - and do so make us feel like we're heroes too.

I give this 4.5 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 8 to 18.

By Juror #10. KIDS FIRST!
KIDS FIRST!® Kid Jurors say - "Welcome to Terre Blue" welcomes us to a world where we meet aliens of every description - perhaps too many. We learn not to judge those who may seem icky or unattractive to us. We learn that they may love their families; that they may have uncontrolled moments; that they may fear for their jobs; that they may have issues and lives and concerns not so different from our own. This is a profound premise for a story - a story that is relevant to our times, to our humanity. But the art of film making asks us to do more than just tell a story. Hopefully, it asks us to rise to new understandings - perhaps ones that we cannot yet see. It paints worlds that don't yet exist and implies meanings we don't yet understand.

Animation is an art form that allows us to tell/teach the heart stories that are important to us all. Think of "Kung Fu Panda" - how can a fat, untalented, commoner achieve transcendence? Think of "Mulan" and "Moana" and "Brave" where young women find the strength to save their people - and all the other animated features where common people engage internal strengths and external circumstances to achieve happiness - not power - not wealth - not fame. Mere happiness.

This story is a great premise that needs to find more of its heart. Arguably the most important skill in writing children's screenplays is to know how to create emotional content that we can all relate to - and do so make us feel like we're heroes too.

I give this 4.5 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 8 to 18.

By Juror #10. KIDS FIRST!
Juror Recommended Age: 8-18 Suggested Retail Price: $ Media:



This title is in the KIDS FIRST! Film Festival - it may not be a regular, endorsed title
NEW BELIEVER, A
NEW BELIEVER, A - ELLIE MAE SMITH
Series: SCREENPLAY, AGES 8-18
Description - Mia, a 12 year old girl, who is a very strong Christian. She goes to church 2 times a week, always volunteering, and always helping others. The dad, late 30's early 40s James Smith, was once a church loving child himself, until his mother passed away from cancer when he was 12. Leaving him to live with his new found alcoholic father who also stopped in his belief after his other son Donald, was killed in a car accident. Neither father nor son couldn't understand how a loving God could allow such things to happen to them, and so they fell out of the life as a believer, always searching for answers he could not find on his own....until.
KIDS FIRST!® Adult Jurors say - Script for renewal of family and religious beliefs has a viable niche in storytelling. In this case it is Christian based and centered. The author being a twelve-year-old girl is compelling as her writing is nicely scripted. The script, while occasionally verging on sermon quoting rather the voice of the young girl, has value - a father becomes distant following the concurrent loss of mother and brother. He turns accusingly on God and the beliefs which his daughter holds true. She orchestrates his return to the church and he begins to realize a fuller life - this through communication, her love of her father and her faith. I give this script 3.5 out of 5 stars and recommend it for rages 8 to 18, plus adults. Reviewed by Juror #11.
KIDS FIRST!® Kid Jurors say - Script for renewal of family and religious beliefs has a viable niche in storytelling. In this case it is Christian based and centered. The author being a twelve-year-old girl is compelling as her writing is nicely scripted. The script, while occasionally verging on sermon quoting rather the voice of the young girl, has value - a father becomes distant following the concurrent loss of mother and brother. He turns accusingly on God and the beliefs which his daughter holds true. She orchestrates his return to the church and he begins to realize a fuller life - this through communication, her love of her father and her faith. I give this script 3.5 out of 5 stars and recommend it for rages 8 to 18, plus adults. Reviewed by Juror #11.
Juror Recommended Age: 8-18 Suggested Retail Price: $ Media:


This title is in the KIDS FIRST! Film Festival - it may not be a regular, endorsed title
THAT PIGEON TALKED
THAT PIGEON TALKED - KENNETH HICKS / ANNE ROTHMAN-HICKS
Series: SCREENPLAY, AGES 8-12
Description - New York City children encounter a talking pigeon in Central Park and, over the course of a day-long adventure, help to turn the pigeon back into a man while eluding his arch enemy, a hawk that is trying to eat him.
KIDS FIRST!® Adult Jurors say - The power of magical thinking is not only that it can transport us to other worlds but also because it allows us to realize that anything is possible. It encourages us, as writers and as literary adventurers, to ask the 'what if' questions with the understanding that the answer could be mind blowing. Neil Gaiman once said, (roughly paraphrased) 'what if a werewolf sank his teeth into the arm of a chair? Then, we would have to write a scene describing the chair tracks leaving the murder scene.' Ridiculous, but to the point. This script not only opens that door, it tells us that we have all the help we need, friends, family, love, commitment - and who knows, other worldly beings and oddly serendipitous characters of good will who will come to our aid. This is why it's such a good script for kids - and for adults, if they will only listen.

I give this 5 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 8 to 18. Reviewed by Juror #12. KIDS FIRST!
KIDS FIRST!® Kid Jurors say - The power of magical thinking is not only that it can transport us to other worlds but also because it allows us to realize that anything is possible. It encourages us, as writers and as literary adventurers, to ask the 'what if' questions with the understanding that the answer could be mind blowing. Neil Gaiman once said, (roughly paraphrased) 'what if a werewolf sank his teeth into the arm of a chair? Then, we would have to write a scene describing the chair tracks leaving the murder scene.' Ridiculous, but to the point. This script not only opens that door, it tells us that we have all the help we need, friends, family, love, commitment - and who knows, other worldly beings and oddly serendipitous characters of good will who will come to our aid. This is why it's such a good script for kids - and for adults, if they will only listen.

I give this 5 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 8 to 18. Reviewed by Juror #12. KIDS FIRST!
Juror Recommended Age: 8-12 Suggested Retail Price: $ Media:



This title is in the KIDS FIRST! Film Festival - it may not be a regular, endorsed title
ALICE IN WAR
ALICE IN WAR - STEVEN BOGART
Series: SCREENPLAY, AGES 12-18
Description - When young Alice follows her sister into the desert to save an Angel shot down by the military, she must confront mysteries born of grief and war, find her sister, and get home before they disappear forever.
KIDS FIRST!® Adult Jurors say - Make no mistake. "Alice in War" is a fantastical romp. But! Rather than a simple recounting, this story is a modern allegory - an exploration of self through revisiting memories and facing one's fears and a statement on the way we have accommodated war. It is a remarkable telling of a child's struggle to make sense of the world in view of the death of her father and it's not too much of a stretch to speak of the therapeutic role imagination plays in that endeavor.

With thematic consistency, this piece provides viewers a window into our own struggles to make sense of a world that seems intent on self-destruction. It speaks to our (arguably) voluntary disempowerment, to our willingness to find comfort in lies and to our acceptance of our role as mindless cannon fodder especially when motivated by some form of glorious sacrifice. And, with the wounding of an angel who seems unwilling or unable to stop the carnage, there is a statement on the impotence of religion.

The continual sounds of war bring to mind the Swedish film, 'Force Majeure' the background of which is relentlessly pounded by the sound of cannons used to trigger avalanches. It becomes a character on its own. In this case, the sound of war is something we've learned to live with - background noise to life. The visual component of this script is often extraordinary - notably the piano scene and Britton's music, but many others are outstanding as well.

All in all this is a story remarkably well crafted and well told. Excellent writing, with a bit of room to improve. I give Alice In War 4.5 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 12 to 18, plus adults. By Juror #10.
KIDS FIRST!® Kid Jurors say - Make no mistake. "Alice in War" is a fantastical romp. But! Rather than a simple recounting, this story is a modern allegory - an exploration of self through revisiting memories and facing one's fears and a statement on the way we have accommodated war. It is a remarkable telling of a child's struggle to make sense of the world in view of the death of her father and it's not too much of a stretch to speak of the therapeutic role imagination plays in that endeavor.

With thematic consistency, this piece provides viewers a window into our own struggles to make sense of a world that seems intent on self-destruction. It speaks to our (arguably) voluntary disempowerment, to our willingness to find comfort in lies and to our acceptance of our role as mindless cannon fodder especially when motivated by some form of glorious sacrifice. And, with the wounding of an angel who seems unwilling or unable to stop the carnage, there is a statement on the impotence of religion.

The continual sounds of war bring to mind the Swedish film, 'Force Majeure' the background of which is relentlessly pounded by the sound of cannons used to trigger avalanches. It becomes a character on its own. In this case, the sound of war is something we've learned to live with - background noise to life. The visual component of this script is often extraordinary - notably the piano scene and Britton's music, but many others are outstanding as well.

All in all this is a story remarkably well crafted and well told. Excellent writing, with a bit of room to improve. I give Alice In War 4.5 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 12 to 18, plus adults. By Juror #10.
Juror Recommended Age: 12-18 Suggested Retail Price: $ Media:



This title is in the KIDS FIRST! Film Festival - it may not be a regular, endorsed title
DRAGON'S CANDLE: SURPRISE OF THE CENTURY, THE
DRAGON'S CANDLE: SURPRISE OF THE CENTURY, THE - BRYAN MICHAEL STOLLER
Series: SCREENPLAY, AGES 5-12
Description - Gandlin, a friendly wizard from the middle-ages creates an intricate candle in the shape of a dragon for the King's birthday bash. When the wizard's bumbling apprentice accidentally transports the candle into the 21st Century, and it ends up as a prize in a cereal box of a popular cereal brand, Gandlin has to retrieve it before someone lights the candle thus releasing a thirty-six foot fire breathing dragon.
KIDS FIRST!® Adult Jurors say - The assemblage of interesting characters - each with their individual traits and needs, interfacing with a Wizard from medieval times, proves to be a fascinating, fun and very cinematic ride. He locates his magic dragon candle with the potential of being a 36 foot fire breathing dragon in a children's breakfast cereal box. This journey in which costumes, fantasy, dragons, dreams, love, trust, realization are combined by following a time traveling Wizard into the 21st Century retrieving a birthday candle he enchanted for the King's party is a clever, often complicated, always surprising story hidden within which lie jewels for growth and understanding for both youth and adult. I give this 4.5 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 8 to 18, plus adults. By Juror #11, KIDS FIRST!
KIDS FIRST!® Kid Jurors say - The assemblage of interesting characters - each with their individual traits and needs, interfacing with a Wizard from medieval times, proves to be a fascinating, fun and very cinematic ride. He locates his magic dragon candle with the potential of being a 36 foot fire breathing dragon in a children's breakfast cereal box. This journey in which costumes, fantasy, dragons, dreams, love, trust, realization are combined by following a time traveling Wizard into the 21st Century retrieving a birthday candle he enchanted for the King's party is a clever, often complicated, always surprising story hidden within which lie jewels for growth and understanding for both youth and adult. I give this 4.5 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 8 to 18, plus adults. By Juror #11, KIDS FIRST!
Juror Recommended Age: 5-12 Suggested Retail Price: $ Media:


This title is in the KIDS FIRST! Film Festival - it may not be a regular, endorsed title
NEWELLS, THE: THE CREAKING FLOORBOARD (PILOT)
NEWELLS, THE: THE CREAKING FLOORBOARD (PILOT) - STEVE GARRY
Series: SCREENPLAY, AGES 10-18
Description - Series Premise: Ordinary suburban parents with dreams of a better life have two intriguing children - are the kids' magic experiences imaginary or real?; Pilot Description: A young brother and sister try to out-scare one another with bedtime fables, to prove who is the more irresponsible of the two.
KIDS FIRST!® Adult Jurors say - Telling a good story in the most succinct and visual way is challenging. There's no substitute for hammering on the narrative until the pictures it evokes set up the tension to come in less than four lines. It quickly teaches a writer which visual aspects are important and which aren't.

Clarity about where we are is vital. Confusion about scene location and time is a script killer and some readers will reject a script based on that alone. That's one of the reasons it used to be said that flashbacks were frowned upon. Well, in this day and age - in fantasy and in the wobbly time/space continuum of sci-fi, flashbacks are vital. Formatting can help. It can be a pain, but check 'The Screenwriter's Bible' for questions. It's the US industry standard.

All scenes always need tension. It can be overt; it can be sub-textual, but it has to be there. Typically it happens when the business of the scene tells us a different story from the one stated in the dialog. That also means that the dialog needs to be less on the nose, that is, more circumspect, more cautious, carrying levels of meaning - or, in the case of the parents, prompting responses without actually asking for them.

In children's programs, where we are trying to teach, showing rather than telling is vital. Children do most of their learning through senses other than just listening. (Actually, so do most adults.) They need to feel the scene. And they will if it's well thought out. This means that the visual aspect of a scene should probably proceed the development of the dialog. It's more easily done in zombie scenes and snot-monster scenes because they carry the emotional tension. It's more difficult in cerebral scenes where the dialog is about abstract ideas - like responsibility. In these cases, especially for children (and even for adults) find the picture.

This pilot portends a fun, stimulating series that has the potential to teach (however sneakily) within the realms of entertainment. A thought would be to rename it, The Newells and the Creaky Monster - more provocative and it offers the opportunity of developing the Monster as a person - uh, character.

I give this script 4.5 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 8 to 12. Reviewed by Juror #10.
KIDS FIRST!® Kid Jurors say - Telling a good story in the most succinct and visual way is challenging. There's no substitute for hammering on the narrative until the pictures it evokes set up the tension to come in less than four lines. It quickly teaches a writer which visual aspects are important and which aren't.

Clarity about where we are is vital. Confusion about scene location and time is a script killer and some readers will reject a script based on that alone. That's one of the reasons it used to be said that flashbacks were frowned upon. Well, in this day and age - in fantasy and in the wobbly time/space continuum of sci-fi, flashbacks are vital. Formatting can help. It can be a pain, but check 'The Screenwriter's Bible' for questions. It's the US industry standard.

All scenes always need tension. It can be overt; it can be sub-textual, but it has to be there. Typically it happens when the business of the scene tells us a different story from the one stated in the dialog. That also means that the dialog needs to be less on the nose, that is, more circumspect, more cautious, carrying levels of meaning - or, in the case of the parents, prompting responses without actually asking for them.

In children's programs, where we are trying to teach, showing rather than telling is vital. Children do most of their learning through senses other than just listening. (Actually, so do most adults.) They need to feel the scene. And they will if it's well thought out. This means that the visual aspect of a scene should probably proceed the development of the dialog. It's more easily done in zombie scenes and snot-monster scenes because they carry the emotional tension. It's more difficult in cerebral scenes where the dialog is about abstract ideas - like responsibility. In these cases, especially for children (and even for adults) find the picture.

This pilot portends a fun, stimulating series that has the potential to teach (however sneakily) within the realms of entertainment. A thought would be to rename it, The Newells and the Creaky Monster - more provocative and it offers the opportunity of developing the Monster as a person - uh, character.

I give this script 4.5 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 8 to 12. Reviewed by Juror #10.
Juror Recommended Age: 10-18 Suggested Retail Price: $ Media:



This title is in the KIDS FIRST! Film Festival - it may not be a regular, endorsed title
THE CIRCUS MUST GO ON!
THE CIRCUS MUST GO ON! - PENKOV´┐Ż TEREZA
Series: SCREENPLAY, AGES 8-12
Description - The Hero of our story is an eight years old little Krist´┐Żnka, who sees a ghost of her passed away Grandpa. Her neighborhood feels anxious about it and on recommendation of her teacher she fell to the hands of the doctor Svetlana, who is going to set a trap for the little girl. Is she able to flee? A what will happen when the circus will arrive into town?
KIDS FIRST!® Adult Jurors say - This is a charming story, one that we have loved in its many incarnations over the years. And while it's probably true that there are no new stories, it is in the telling, in the moments of shining heaven and the moments of darkest hell and all the dismal greys in between that we give stories new life. That is the challenge of the writer.

Certainly the story structure is here as are the prerequisite characters. The family characters are true and loving, but appropriately lacking in faith. The protagonist, Kristynka, is innocent and bravely accepts the challenges of both her real and imaginative worlds. And most importantly, she leads us to believe that her 'sight' is true. And, of course, the antagonist is appropriately bad.

The dialog must serve both the character and the story. For the most part, these characters are well spoken but it sometimes misses the opportunity to add emotional depth to a character or to heighten conflict. Overall, the bones of the story are present but the meat - the fear, the emotion, the enchantment are understated.

We give The Circus Must Go On 3.5 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 8-12, plus adults. Reviewed by Juror #10.
KIDS FIRST!® Kid Jurors say - This is a charming story, one that we have loved in its many incarnations over the years. And while it's probably true that there are no new stories, it is in the telling, in the moments of shining heaven and the moments of darkest hell and all the dismal greys in between that we give stories new life. That is the challenge of the writer.

Certainly the story structure is here as are the prerequisite characters. The family characters are true and loving, but appropriately lacking in faith. The protagonist, Kristynka, is innocent and bravely accepts the challenges of both her real and imaginative worlds. And most importantly, she leads us to believe that her 'sight' is true. And, of course, the antagonist is appropriately bad.

The dialog must serve both the character and the story. For the most part, these characters are well spoken but it sometimes misses the opportunity to add emotional depth to a character or to heighten conflict. Overall, the bones of the story are present but the meat - the fear, the emotion, the enchantment are understated.

We give The Circus Must Go On 3.5 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 8-12, plus adults. Reviewed by Juror #10.
Juror Recommended Age: 8-12 Suggested Retail Price: $ Media:



This title is in the KIDS FIRST! Film Festival - it may not be a regular, endorsed title
AMY AND ANGEL
AMY AND ANGEL - ROBERT CRAIG
Series: SCREENPLAY, AGES 8-18
Description - Shy 16-year old Amy just wants to dance, but her deafness causes her dreams to be shattered when she is bullied out of dance class. Finding the most unbelievable new dance partner, her neighbors neglected dog, they perform a spectacular routine that lands them on a national TV talent show where they compete against her former dance crew.
KIDS FIRST!® Adult Jurors say - This is a heartfelt story that will appeal to middle school and younger high school kids. As written earlier: a deaf girl is bullied out of her dance class and finds an unlikely partner in a rejected dog and together they win a big dance competition. But more than that - this is the story of a young dancer who must prove to herself and to those who would put her down, that she is capable of rising to any occasion and coping with any circumstance. The conflict is not just the external one with Ruby's girls, it's - obviously - the internal one with herself. In creating a dance with Angel, she's given a gift which, in the end helps all the members of the cast: Angel, the dog, Lisa - who learns the value of friendship, Ruby and her father, Amy's own family who learn coping with failure, Lance and Sandy and Marta and Jimmy.

American kids (and adults) like stories about underdogs. We rejoice when someone we identify with wins. It gives us hope and encouragement. This is such a story. But it's not just an underdog story, it's also a coming of age story that helps young people understand that growing up is a process of facing challenges of all kinds. It's how we learn and grow. And, as uncomfortable - even painful - as it can be, the great feeling of knowing that somehow we found the way through - like each of these characters, makes us all feel stronger.

I give this 4.5 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 8 to 18. Reviewed by Juror #10.
KIDS FIRST!® Kid Jurors say - This is a heartfelt story that will appeal to middle school and younger high school kids. As written earlier: a deaf girl is bullied out of her dance class and finds an unlikely partner in a rejected dog and together they win a big dance competition. But more than that - this is the story of a young dancer who must prove to herself and to those who would put her down, that she is capable of rising to any occasion and coping with any circumstance. The conflict is not just the external one with Ruby's girls, it's - obviously - the internal one with herself. In creating a dance with Angel, she's given a gift which, in the end helps all the members of the cast: Angel, the dog, Lisa - who learns the value of friendship, Ruby and her father, Amy's own family who learn coping with failure, Lance and Sandy and Marta and Jimmy.

American kids (and adults) like stories about underdogs. We rejoice when someone we identify with wins. It gives us hope and encouragement. This is such a story. But it's not just an underdog story, it's also a coming of age story that helps young people understand that growing up is a process of facing challenges of all kinds. It's how we learn and grow. And, as uncomfortable - even painful - as it can be, the great feeling of knowing that somehow we found the way through - like each of these characters, makes us all feel stronger.

I give this 4.5 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 8 to 18. Reviewed by Juror #10.
Juror Recommended Age: 8-18 Suggested Retail Price: $ Media:



This title is in the KIDS FIRST! Film Festival - it may not be a regular, endorsed title
STARHOPPER
STARHOPPER - TAYLER CARTER
Series: SCREENPLAY, AGES 8-18
Description - After years of wishing for something to save them from their mundane home planet- and their over protective parents- a set of twins get exactly what they wish for when a strange alien arrives.
KIDS FIRST!® Adult Jurors say - A tight family of two women and two 12-year-old children live on a planet visited by an Alien investigating the possible threat and destruction to their existence. Their safety and work on the planet is saved by killing an underground monster. Life and work moves forward with the added help of the Alien in their newfound friendship, however, unbeknownst to all, there lingers an even more severe threat deep in the tunnels "ready to roar."

Entertaining, progressive sequences, colorful environment of the planet. Each character has a personality, element of humor in dialogue. Family expresses awareness of each other and the reality of growth and exploration wanted by the children. The plot combines multiple lessons to be gained from earth and space both.

There is no time frame established as to how far into the future the story plays out. There is no context for the family being on this planet and the length of time they've been there. Why they are even there? The only setting given is that "No one really travels this far out in the J-Quadrant." A bit more location description would enrich the story. I give this 4.5 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 8-12.

Reviewed by Juror #11.
KIDS FIRST!® Kid Jurors say - A tight family of two women and two 12-year-old children live on a planet visited by an Alien investigating the possible threat and destruction to their existence. Their safety and work on the planet is saved by killing an underground monster. Life and work moves forward with the added help of the Alien in their newfound friendship, however, unbeknownst to all, there lingers an even more severe threat deep in the tunnels "ready to roar."

Entertaining, progressive sequences, colorful environment of the planet. Each character has a personality, element of humor in dialogue. Family expresses awareness of each other and the reality of growth and exploration wanted by the children. The plot combines multiple lessons to be gained from earth and space both.

There is no time frame established as to how far into the future the story plays out. There is no context for the family being on this planet and the length of time they've been there. Why they are even there? The only setting given is that "No one really travels this far out in the J-Quadrant." A bit more location description would enrich the story. I give this 4.5 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 8-12.

Reviewed by Juror #11.
Juror Recommended Age: 7-18 Suggested Retail Price: $ Media:



This title is in the KIDS FIRST! Film Festival - it may not be a regular, endorsed title
BUCKHORN ACADEMY
BUCKHORN ACADEMY - TAYLER CARTER
Series: SCREENPLAY, AGES 8-18
Description - Two siblings get accepted to a prestigious boarding school deep in the Appalachian mountains, only to realize upon arrival that it's actually a school for cryptids.
KIDS FIRST!® Adult Jurors say - Author maintains crisp and clever dialogue which moves the story from start to finish. Interest is generated early on towards the two main characters as they move through the challenges of Buckhorn Academy and the outwardly strange physical appearances of fellow students. Author succeeds in building on each previous situation which keeps story entertaining. Weakness is in the lack of indication as to why the Academy has a mixture of non-human animal students from salamander bodies to Bigfoot. Is this an Academy for magicians? Philosophers? Misfits? Interplanetary? Why are they there? The fact that the human teenagers at no time question this phenomenon weakens the story in spite of their resolution to fit in and stay.

Yes, There is commercial potential in that the characters are interesting, fun to follow, and inspire curiosity as to how problems will be solved and friendships formed. How these different life forms come to support one another and help one another is clever. Making friends with those different from you and dealing with bullies are worthy subject matters for adults and kids, especially when presented in a fantasy and / or animated venue. I give this 4 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 8 to 18. Reviewed by Juror #11.
KIDS FIRST!® Kid Jurors say - Author maintains crisp and clever dialogue which moves the story from start to finish. Interest is generated early on towards the two main characters as they move through the challenges of Buckhorn Academy and the outwardly strange physical appearances of fellow students. Author succeeds in building on each previous situation which keeps story entertaining. Weakness is in the lack of indication as to why the Academy has a mixture of non-human animal students from salamander bodies to Bigfoot. Is this an Academy for magicians? Philosophers? Misfits? Interplanetary? Why are they there? The fact that the human teenagers at no time question this phenomenon weakens the story in spite of their resolution to fit in and stay.

Yes, There is commercial potential in that the characters are interesting, fun to follow, and inspire curiosity as to how problems will be solved and friendships formed. How these different life forms come to support one another and help one another is clever. Making friends with those different from you and dealing with bullies are worthy subject matters for adults and kids, especially when presented in a fantasy and / or animated venue. I give this 4 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 8 to 18. Reviewed by Juror #11.
Juror Recommended Age: 7-18 Suggested Retail Price: $ Media:



This title is in the KIDS FIRST! Film Festival - it may not be a regular, endorsed title
BONEYFIDDLE
BONEYFIDDLE - TAYLER CARTER
Series: SCREENPLAY, AGES 8-18
Description - After being sent to live with a grandmother she barely knows, an eleven-year-old discovers that her new town has long forgotten secrets behind its worn-down storefronts, waiting to be discovered.
KIDS FIRST!® Adult Jurors say - This is a good script. It's well-written. The author obviously understands formatting, dialog and pacing. The character development is good and the emotional through-line which defines the arc of the protagonist is strong. We're engaged and invested in the outcome of the story. I think we'd be surprised at how many kids will relate to this story - and just as importantly, how many adults will also.

One of the attributes of Disney-style animation is its ability to carry a kids' story and an adult story simultaneously. This script does that. It tells us that growing up is difficult; that raising children while trying to keep one's life moving forward is difficult. And - as this script so poignantly points out, that raising parents - or having to act the part of a parent in the absence of one while trying to grow up is even harder. Nicely done.

I give this 4.5 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 8 to 18, plus adults. Reviewed by Juror #10.
KIDS FIRST!® Kid Jurors say - This is a good script. It's well-written. The author obviously understands formatting, dialog and pacing. The character development is good and the emotional through-line which defines the arc of the protagonist is strong. We're engaged and invested in the outcome of the story. I think we'd be surprised at how many kids will relate to this story - and just as importantly, how many adults will also.

One of the attributes of Disney-style animation is its ability to carry a kids' story and an adult story simultaneously. This script does that. It tells us that growing up is difficult; that raising children while trying to keep one's life moving forward is difficult. And - as this script so poignantly points out, that raising parents - or having to act the part of a parent in the absence of one while trying to grow up is even harder. Nicely done.

I give this 4.5 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 8 to 18, plus adults. Reviewed by Juror #10.
Juror Recommended Age: 8-18 Suggested Retail Price: $ Media:



This title is in the KIDS FIRST! Film Festival - it may not be a regular, endorsed title
DARBY PETTY AND THE LOST TREASURE
DARBY PETTY AND THE LOST TREASURE - D.C. SAYRE
Series: SCREENPLAY, AGES 8-18
Description - Held captive by an underground clan of ancient Celtic warriors, a sticky-fingered, young girl races against time, creatures, and crooks, to steal a priceless artifact from a museum and save the world.
KIDS FIRST!® Adult Jurors say - Darby, 12 years old and an orphan, lives with a somewhat superstitious Irish grandmother who owns an ancient Celtic harp. She wants to leave the coastal town to return to America and will steal jewelry to do this. Magic intercedes as Darby becomes involved with the hidden realm of Leprechauns and their magic ancient treasure sought after by sinister greedy antique dealers of the upper realm of the coastal town. Darby even plunks the Celtic harp, saving the Leprechaun world from the savage snake. Her cleverness stops the evil tortures imposed by the antique dealers. Ultimately Darby becomes a young girl secure in her own self, her strengths and the love of her grandmother. She also is accepted as family in the realm of the Leprechauns. The last scene sums up the resolution of all the conflicts within this colorful fantasy adventure story 'as in the last gleam of daylight, Darby, Roy, his children Beagan and Molly are seated appearing as silhouettes in a serene Irish horizon like gargoyles on a castle. We give this 4 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 8 to 18, Reviewed by Juror #11.
KIDS FIRST!® Kid Jurors say - Darby, 12 years old and an orphan, lives with a somewhat superstitious Irish grandmother who owns an ancient Celtic harp. She wants to leave the coastal town to return to America and will steal jewelry to do this. Magic intercedes as Darby becomes involved with the hidden realm of Leprechauns and their magic ancient treasure sought after by sinister greedy antique dealers of the upper realm of the coastal town. Darby even plunks the Celtic harp, saving the Leprechaun world from the savage snake. Her cleverness stops the evil tortures imposed by the antique dealers. Ultimately Darby becomes a young girl secure in her own self, her strengths and the love of her grandmother. She also is accepted as family in the realm of the Leprechauns. The last scene sums up the resolution of all the conflicts within this colorful fantasy adventure story 'as in the last gleam of daylight, Darby, Roy, his children Beagan and Molly are seated appearing as silhouettes in a serene Irish horizon like gargoyles on a castle. We give this 4 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 8 to 18, Reviewed by Juror #11.
Juror Recommended Age: 8-18 Suggested Retail Price: $ Media:


This title is in the KIDS FIRST! Film Festival - it may not be a regular, endorsed title
REBORN
REBORN - NICK TONEY
Series: SCREENPLAY, AGES 8-18
Description - When a courageous young orphan is reincarnated as a sea turtle, he and his newfound friends must save an aquatic city and triumph over its stubborn dictator while simultaneously overcoming the strenuous, dire obstacles presented by the ocean's excessive pollution.
KIDS FIRST!® Adult Jurors say - With ingenuity in action and clever dialogue Reborn follows three sea turtles as they realize they have been reborn from a previous human life. Under the direction of a concerned octopus they form a team determined to remove a dying aquatic colony away from the pollution and dictatorship of its ruling Vampire Squid into a fresh new aquatic fish colony, free of corruption. Reborn addresses the crisis of ocean pollution and, as an animated feature film, it could drive home the idea that necessary solutions can be found in teamwork, family awareness and action. I give this screenplay 4 out of 5 stars, accept it for the KIDS FIRST! Film Festival and recommend it for ages 8 to18, plus adults. Reviewed by Juror #11.
KIDS FIRST!® Kid Jurors say - With ingenuity in action and clever dialogue Reborn follows three sea turtles as they realize they have been reborn from a previous human life. Under the direction of a concerned octopus they form a team determined to remove a dying aquatic colony away from the pollution and dictatorship of its ruling Vampire Squid into a fresh new aquatic fish colony, free of corruption. Reborn addresses the crisis of ocean pollution and, as an animated feature film, it could drive home the idea that necessary solutions can be found in teamwork, family awareness and action. I give this screenplay 4 out of 5 stars, accept it for the KIDS FIRST! Film Festival and recommend it for ages 8 to18, plus adults. Reviewed by Juror #11.
Juror Recommended Age: 8-18 Suggested Retail Price: $ Media:


This title is in the KIDS FIRST! Film Festival - it may not be a regular, endorsed title
STUMPERLAND
STUMPERLAND - ROBERT LUGTO
Series: SCREENPLAY, AGE 8-12
Description - Stumperland's very own Woodward Stumpingham enlists the help of two orphan boys, two chimpanzee brothers, and two duly trucks to become part of his Positive Force Team in order to fight humanity's doom and downfall - the Negators.
KIDS FIRST!® Adult Jurors say - The story of Stumperland has potential and could be really outstanding if a few things get worked out. The characters, even though they may be animated, need to feel real - with emotions and insecurities. Mitch and Mikey seem a little too well-adjusted for kids who have lost their parents. Mitch may be a jock/hero at school, but - he's a guy who talks to trees - that's got to make him somewhat of a weird element in his social group.

The threat to the forest needs to set a tension that motivates the characters. It makes Woodward anxious to get humans on board and it probably makes Mitch angry. These are the energies that create action. Don't hold back on the emotion. It's vital for engaging your audience. Push the drama.

Hold back on the number of characters. Think about what the camera sees. You don't want lines of characters standing around on set - and the producer won't want to pay for them. If this is a pilot, think about the next couple of episodes and the challenges Mitch, Mikey and the team will face. That will help you focus more on setting them on the right path in this script.

Embrace the fantasy. Bring in the magic. Whether this is going to be a live action / animated hybrid (think Alice in Wonderland) or fully animated, you need to think about the world you're creating and make it clear and believable to your audience -- and to the director/producer - by writing it in the story. You want your narrative to briefly, but beautifully, set the scene and the actor's dialog to reveal the conflict. Don't over-write. Learn to choose your words. Break up long dialog with bits of action. And speak your dialog out loud as you write it. You'll be surprised at what comes out. Aaron Sorkin once told a story about how he was writing an argument out loud and broke his nose on a mirror as he was yelling into it.

Also - pilots generally end with cliff hangers. A band on the beach, while fun, isn't a cliff hanger - unless there's a bomb in the bass drum. If this is actually an animated feature, then you have to fill up another seventy-five pages or so.

I give Stumperland 3.5 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 8 to 12. Reviewed by Juror #10.
KIDS FIRST!® Kid Jurors say - The story of Stumperland has potential and could be really outstanding if a few things get worked out. The characters, even though they may be animated, need to feel real - with emotions and insecurities. Mitch and Mikey seem a little too well-adjusted for kids who have lost their parents. Mitch may be a jock/hero at school, but - he's a guy who talks to trees - that's got to make him somewhat of a weird element in his social group.

The threat to the forest needs to set a tension that motivates the characters. It makes Woodward anxious to get humans on board and it probably makes Mitch angry. These are the energies that create action. Don't hold back on the emotion. It's vital for engaging your audience. Push the drama.

Hold back on the number of characters. Think about what the camera sees. You don't want lines of characters standing around on set - and the producer won't want to pay for them. If this is a pilot, think about the next couple of episodes and the challenges Mitch, Mikey and the team will face. That will help you focus more on setting them on the right path in this script.

Embrace the fantasy. Bring in the magic. Whether this is going to be a live action / animated hybrid (think Alice in Wonderland) or fully animated, you need to think about the world you're creating and make it clear and believable to your audience -- and to the director/producer - by writing it in the story. You want your narrative to briefly, but beautifully, set the scene and the actor's dialog to reveal the conflict. Don't over-write. Learn to choose your words. Break up long dialog with bits of action. And speak your dialog out loud as you write it. You'll be surprised at what comes out. Aaron Sorkin once told a story about how he was writing an argument out loud and broke his nose on a mirror as he was yelling into it.

Also - pilots generally end with cliff hangers. A band on the beach, while fun, isn't a cliff hanger - unless there's a bomb in the bass drum. If this is actually an animated feature, then you have to fill up another seventy-five pages or so.

I give Stumperland 3.5 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 8 to 12. Reviewed by Juror #10.
Juror Recommended Age: 8-12 Suggested Retail Price: $ Media:



This title is in the KIDS FIRST! Film Festival - it may not be a regular, endorsed title
IN THE FOOTSTEPS OF THADDEUS THACKERAY
IN THE FOOTSTEPS OF THADDEUS THACKERAY - ADAM MCDANIEL
Series: SCREENPLAY, AGES 8-12
Description - Award-winning buddy comedy set in 1943, where 14 year-old Judson Conover dreams of sharing adventures with his favorite cartoon movie hero, Dublin McGinn. But when he mysteriously switches bodies with McGinn's comic sidekick, diminutive English teenage genius Thaddeus Thackeray, Judson realizes that surviving animated serials is MUCH harder than it looks. Meanwhile, Thackeray - lost within an all-too-real world at war - must figure out how to set things right. And the only one who can possibly help him is Judson's best friend, Kenny, who isn't quick to believe Thaddeus' rather fantastical story.
KIDS FIRST!® Adult Jurors say - This is a story set in two different worlds: the fantasy world of a 1940s animated movie serial, and the real world (if you dare call any movie setting "real") of a small suburban American town during WWII. To quote from the author: Script is a story set in two different worlds: the fantasy world of a 1940s animated movie serial, and the real world (if you dare call any movie setting "real") of a small suburban American town during WWII. Worlds can blend and one is wise not to "underestimate the power of love that can transcend life and death."

In spite of occasional seemingly excessive descriptions by the writer presenting the characters and scenes to the extent of directing, the script unfolds cleverly.

Script has commercial potential. Author presents his choice for animation throughout for both the 'movie reel' and the 'real world' as 'souls are interchanged and they have to live in different bodies.' The script provides sets from 'stone carved ancient tombs and caves' to alleys to school settings to WWII scenes. It is a vivid script where two young men belonging to different worlds make the same wish at the same time.

Key characters have unique qualities and dialogue. Judson (real world) is 14, big ears, buck teeth and loves adventure. Kenny, his friend, is smart, bored by the movie thinking it 'going downhill', shy with girls. Hunter, their bully is mean. Thaddeus, 17, (of the movie screen world) is short, scrawny, English dialect, an adventurer with his father's diary, Dublin McGinn is his friend, muscular, Indian Jones 'without the brains' but who proves himself invaluable. Debaucherie is sinister who wants to steal the crown from Thaddeus. Tone of the script is light, although there are deathly excursions with cobras, dismembered limbs floating like vines in the air, molten lava, and stolen Cadillacs. Yet within these moments each triumph is significant. There are continuous dialogues back and forth - amusing easy and sincere camaraderie. Even the inability of Kenny to dance and communicate with a girl is helped by his new friend Thaddeus, 'be sensitive to women'. Multiple ages would enjoy the action and emotional confidence developed in the characters. Each of the two heroes experiences a reunion with the energy of a deceased brother and parent. Thaddeus realizes that he is 'terrified that he won't always be able to save his friend, Dublin' He switched places because he wanted to be anywhere else than to see that happen. Judson allowed mean Hunter to take the rabbit's foot to save his friend Kenny. Two worlds, four different young men, two soul exchanges. The journey back home.

Pacing has been explained above. At times pacing is confusing and takes a very short detour due to the parallel stories existing side by side. The humor, especially the more streetwise of Judson, is fun and adds vitality and a good banter to the more formal speech of Thaddeus. Ultimately the story remains intact and a compelling read.

I give this screenplay 4.5 out of 5 stars and recommend for ages 8 to12, Juror #11, KIDS FIRST!
KIDS FIRST!® Kid Jurors say - This is a story set in two different worlds: the fantasy world of a 1940s animated movie serial, and the real world (if you dare call any movie setting "real") of a small suburban American town during WWII. To quote from the author: Script is a story set in two different worlds: the fantasy world of a 1940s animated movie serial, and the real world (if you dare call any movie setting "real") of a small suburban American town during WWII. Worlds can blend and one is wise not to "underestimate the power of love that can transcend life and death."

In spite of occasional seemingly excessive descriptions by the writer presenting the characters and scenes to the extent of directing, the script unfolds cleverly.

Script has commercial potential. Author presents his choice for animation throughout for both the 'movie reel' and the 'real world' as 'souls are interchanged and they have to live in different bodies.' The script provides sets from 'stone carved ancient tombs and caves' to alleys to school settings to WWII scenes. It is a vivid script where two young men belonging to different worlds make the same wish at the same time.

Key characters have unique qualities and dialogue. Judson (real world) is 14, big ears, buck teeth and loves adventure. Kenny, his friend, is smart, bored by the movie thinking it 'going downhill', shy with girls. Hunter, their bully is mean. Thaddeus, 17, (of the movie screen world) is short, scrawny, English dialect, an adventurer with his father's diary, Dublin McGinn is his friend, muscular, Indian Jones 'without the brains' but who proves himself invaluable. Debaucherie is sinister who wants to steal the crown from Thaddeus. Tone of the script is light, although there are deathly excursions with cobras, dismembered limbs floating like vines in the air, molten lava, and stolen Cadillacs. Yet within these moments each triumph is significant. There are continuous dialogues back and forth - amusing easy and sincere camaraderie. Even the inability of Kenny to dance and communicate with a girl is helped by his new friend Thaddeus, 'be sensitive to women'. Multiple ages would enjoy the action and emotional confidence developed in the characters. Each of the two heroes experiences a reunion with the energy of a deceased brother and parent. Thaddeus realizes that he is 'terrified that he won't always be able to save his friend, Dublin' He switched places because he wanted to be anywhere else than to see that happen. Judson allowed mean Hunter to take the rabbit's foot to save his friend Kenny. Two worlds, four different young men, two soul exchanges. The journey back home.

Pacing has been explained above. At times pacing is confusing and takes a very short detour due to the parallel stories existing side by side. The humor, especially the more streetwise of Judson, is fun and adds vitality and a good banter to the more formal speech of Thaddeus. Ultimately the story remains intact and a compelling read.

I give this screenplay 4.5 out of 5 stars and recommend for ages 8 to12, Juror #11, KIDS FIRST!
Juror Recommended Age: 8-12 Suggested Retail Price: $ Media:



This title is in the KIDS FIRST! Film Festival - it may not be a regular, endorsed title
CALLIE POLLY-OLI COW
CALLIE POLLY-OLI COW - ROBERT LUGTO
Series: SCREENPLAY, AGES 8-18
Description - This book is the first of a series for this author. These books referred to as ALPHABET SOUP ANIMAL SERIES are a compilation of tongue-twister stories about animals. The stories over dramatize the use of words that begin with one particular alphabet letter. Callie-Polly-Oli Cow is an example. The letter 'C' is dominant. The result is a unique tale about a cow. Look for more stories to follow! Then, add books to your collection. The final result will be your child's first set of encyclopedias with bright, dynamic and colorful pictures. Your child will be introduced to an advanced vocabulary; and as a toddler or elementary student; have great fun reading as a result of the tongue twisters!
KIDS FIRST!® Adult Jurors say - Callie Cow, referred to as a 'dame', is lively. She is looking for a suitor and has particular tastes. Why she wants one is never made clear except she does. As a character she is strong and visual as is Captain Clam who wins her heart. A weakness is in the lack of character description such as with Captain Clam who becomes enamored of Cally Polly from a newspaper photograph. His physical appearance is not provided. The combination of narrator, character interaction with the audience, overuse of alliteration is confusing and weakens the slender storyline. We give this screenplay 3.5 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 5 to 8. By Juror #11, KIDS FIRST!
KIDS FIRST!® Kid Jurors say - Callie Cow, referred to as a 'dame', is lively. She is looking for a suitor and has particular tastes. Why she wants one is never made clear except she does. As a character she is strong and visual as is Captain Clam who wins her heart. A weakness is in the lack of character description such as with Captain Clam who becomes enamored of Cally Polly from a newspaper photograph. His physical appearance is not provided. The combination of narrator, character interaction with the audience, overuse of alliteration is confusing and weakens the slender storyline. We give this screenplay 3.5 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 5 to 8. By Juror #11, KIDS FIRST!
Juror Recommended Age: 8-18 Suggested Retail Price: $ Media:


This title is in the KIDS FIRST! Film Festival - it may not be a regular, endorsed title
POOF!
POOF! - WAYNE BALTZ
Series: SCREENPLAY, AGE 5-12
Description - POOF! is an imaginative, kids-scaled fantasy/adventure with splashes of comedy and drama throughout. Told from a kid's-eye-view, it takes place "in the neighborhood," and the only special effect is invisibility. This script is adapted from the 1st book of our published 3-title "Invisible Kid" book series (we own all rights) that we've been taking to elementary & middle schools for some years. Very popular with the 80,000 kids we've visited with! And at every appearance the most common, breathless question we hear is, "Are you going to make a movie of this?!" This live-action feature stands alone as a complete and satisfying story or, like our books, can be the 1st of a series of 3.
KIDS FIRST!® Adult Jurors say - There is so much to love about this script; it's worth letting it expand to its full potential. The presence of magic unleashes kids' ability to see beyond their world. It expands their perception of what's possible. For adults it does the same but it also carries the burden of hope, a hope beyond hope that transcends their life experience of constraint and limitation. A screenplay about magic needs to blow out those walls that keep us from believing. To do that, a writer can't let life limit him or her. This is drama. This is fantasy. A screenwriter has got to be unafraid of elevating the emotion that will capture the audience and make the story transcend the normal. This means the storyteller should almost have a presence. The narrator should find the situations Casey encounters just as amazing as she does. There should be more magic, more enthusiasm, in the narrative voice - not a wide-eyed magical tone but more anticipation. - a tone that sets up important scenes with greater tension.

And pictures. Tell us the story in pictures. Ramp the tension with settings that feel uneasy. Make the lurking SUV scarier - even appearing in the background in scenes where it currently isn't included. Give us Casey's face at the beginning, enraptured by her TV screen; the stuttering blue light flashing on her wide eyes - maybe with spooky music - as the shadowy figure comes up the stairs. Again, look at the pictures Spielberg uses to set a scene before we even know what it's going to be about.

Casey's arc. And at the end, Casey should finish her arc by being a changed person - someone different than the Casey who started. To a very great degree you have accomplished this. When Terence is in his shop, Casey does show us how magic has become a part of her understanding of life - that dreams do come true. It just needs to be a higher ending - more emotional. Of course, Terence, the Leprechaun has made everything work, but Casey and our understanding of how things work in life is altered - more inclusive of the possibility of magic. And we all need the possibility of magic in our lives.

I give this 4.5 out of 5 stars, recommend it for ages 5 to 12. Reviewed by Juror #12, KIDS FIRST!
KIDS FIRST!® Kid Jurors say - There is so much to love about this script; it's worth letting it expand to its full potential. The presence of magic unleashes kids' ability to see beyond their world. It expands their perception of what's possible. For adults it does the same but it also carries the burden of hope, a hope beyond hope that transcends their life experience of constraint and limitation. A screenplay about magic needs to blow out those walls that keep us from believing. To do that, a writer can't let life limit him or her. This is drama. This is fantasy. A screenwriter has got to be unafraid of elevating the emotion that will capture the audience and make the story transcend the normal. This means the storyteller should almost have a presence. The narrator should find the situations Casey encounters just as amazing as she does. There should be more magic, more enthusiasm, in the narrative voice - not a wide-eyed magical tone but more anticipation. - a tone that sets up important scenes with greater tension.

And pictures. Tell us the story in pictures. Ramp the tension with settings that feel uneasy. Make the lurking SUV scarier - even appearing in the background in scenes where it currently isn't included. Give us Casey's face at the beginning, enraptured by her TV screen; the stuttering blue light flashing on her wide eyes - maybe with spooky music - as the shadowy figure comes up the stairs. Again, look at the pictures Spielberg uses to set a scene before we even know what it's going to be about.

Casey's arc. And at the end, Casey should finish her arc by being a changed person - someone different than the Casey who started. To a very great degree you have accomplished this. When Terence is in his shop, Casey does show us how magic has become a part of her understanding of life - that dreams do come true. It just needs to be a higher ending - more emotional. Of course, Terence, the Leprechaun has made everything work, but Casey and our understanding of how things work in life is altered - more inclusive of the possibility of magic. And we all need the possibility of magic in our lives.

I give this 4.5 out of 5 stars, recommend it for ages 5 to 12. Reviewed by Juror #12, KIDS FIRST!
Juror Recommended Age: 5-12 Suggested Retail Price: $ Media:



This title is in the KIDS FIRST! Film Festival - it may not be a regular, endorsed title
BIKE, THE
BIKE, THE - TIMOTHY BENSON
Series: SCREENPLAY, AGE 5-12
Description - A ten-year-old boy's quest for his dream bike takes some interesting and unexpected turns.
KIDS FIRST!® Adult Jurors say - A young African/American boy works odd jobs to buy a Rocket Bike for Christmas. Although faced daily with abuse from bullies that are intent on ruining his dreams, he is guided by the love of his mom and the wisdom of the toy shop owner to instead, secretly help the very family whose son was his main tormentor. The two young adversaries become free of the need to torment or the need to be defensive in fear and become allies who can work side by side.
KIDS FIRST!® Kid Jurors say - A young African/American boy works odd jobs to buy a Rocket Bike for Christmas. Although faced daily with abuse from bullies that are intent on ruining his dreams, he is guided by the love of his mom and the wisdom of the toy shop owner to instead, secretly help the very family whose son was his main tormentor. The two young adversaries become free of the need to torment or the need to be defensive in fear and become allies who can work side by side.
Juror Recommended Age: 10-18 Suggested Retail Price: $ Media:


This title is in the KIDS FIRST! Film Festival - it may not be a regular, endorsed title
LEGEND AND THE VITAMITES
LEGEND AND THE VITAMITES - LISA PHA G
Series: SCREENPLAY, AGES 8-14
Description - A gifted new student uses the power of animation to control his social anxiety and find a place to fit in among skater friends.
KIDS FIRST!® Adult Jurors say - This is a good first effort at trying to integrate healthy eating into everyday life, and the idea of using an animated / live action approach is a good one. But, it's not new and because of that it needs an approach that is completely compelling and eye-opening.
KIDS FIRST!® Kid Jurors say - This is a good first effort at trying to integrate healthy eating into everyday life, and the idea of using an animated / live action approach is a good one. But, it's not new and because of that it needs an approach that is completely compelling and eye-opening.
Juror Recommended Age: 8-12 Suggested Retail Price: $ Media:


This title is in the KIDS FIRST! Film Festival - it may not be a regular, endorsed title
ALIEN TRAITOR
ALIEN TRAITOR - ANDREW CAHILL-LLOYD
Series: SCREENPLAY, AGES 12-18
Description - Two aliens from the planet Aeon, Bjorn and Zorn, witness the destruction of Planet Earth in 2032. They set out to stop the coming disaster, with the assistance of a small band of misfits, as they piece things together, they discover a fellow Aeonite, Dorian is pushing back against their efforts, to enable religious zealots to maintain their control in a rather hypocritical manner. Bjorn and Zorn begin a chess match with Dorian for control of Earth's destiny. Will Bjorn and Zorn win or lose or will it end in a stalemate. Bjorn and Zorn and their human friends, meet many interesting characters along the way and they discover a lot about the Universe and themselves. The journey takes them to many locations, both terrestrial and extra-terrestrial, and seventy thousand light years from home. When Planet Earth disappears for the third time, it's time for destiny changing decisions.
KIDS FIRST!® Adult Jurors say - Alien Traitor addresses the dilemma of one minority holding the rest of mankind hostage by avoiding the outside galaxy. Earth is worth saving. Traitors exist. Written in three acts, this story is about outer space, time travel, intergalactic control, spies, animal to human shape-shifters, robots that battle over planet Earth's control by multiple religious leaders seeking power and financial gain. The shape-shifters want to keep the Earth from a future explosion and self-destruction. I give this 4 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 12 to 18, plus Adults. Juror #11.
KIDS FIRST!® Kid Jurors say - Alien Traitor addresses the dilemma of one minority holding the rest of mankind hostage by avoiding the outside galaxy. Earth is worth saving. Traitors exist. Written in three acts, this story is about outer space, time travel, intergalactic control, spies, animal to human shape-shifters, robots that battle over planet Earth's control by multiple religious leaders seeking power and financial gain. The shape-shifters want to keep the Earth from a future explosion and self-destruction. I give this 4 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 12 to 18, plus Adults. Juror #11.
Juror Recommended Age: 12-18 Suggested Retail Price: $ Media:


This title is in the KIDS FIRST! Film Festival - it may not be a regular, endorsed title
CHILAQUILES
CHILAQUILES - ROCKY NGUYEN
Series: SCREENPLAY, AGES 5-18
Description - Marie, a second-grader, asks her mom to buy her Lunchables just like the other kids at school. Mom decides to teach her a lesson.
KIDS FIRST!® Adult Jurors say - This fits the criteria for KIDS FIRST! although, it should be noted that it is not a full screenplay. Strengths: Young people from different cultures in a school environment are the focal point. This 10 page vignette uses tamales and the more predictable packaged lunchables to make the point that something different is worth keeping and trying. Weaknesses: Dialogue is secondary to the extensive descriptions used for action scenes. Reviewed by Juror #11, KIDS FIRST!
KIDS FIRST!® Kid Jurors say - This fits the criteria for KIDS FIRST! although, it should be noted that it is not a full screenplay. Strengths: Young people from different cultures in a school environment are the focal point. This 10 page vignette uses tamales and the more predictable packaged lunchables to make the point that something different is worth keeping and trying. Weaknesses: Dialogue is secondary to the extensive descriptions used for action scenes. Reviewed by Juror #11, KIDS FIRST!
Juror Recommended Age: 5-18 Suggested Retail Price: $ Media:


This title is in the KIDS FIRST! Film Festival - it may not be a regular, endorsed title
CONGRESS KID
CONGRESS KID - WILLIAM HODGES
Series: SCREENPLAY, AGES 10-18
Description - After boldly qualifying and winning a special election with the help of a mentoring experienced politician, a bright ten-year-old independent congressman from Indiana has just thirty days to make his mark in Washington. Facing the scrutiny and ridicule of his House colleagues as well as heavy resistance from a plotting, power hungry K-Street lobbyist, the young boy must decide whether to continue escaping the turmoil of Capitol Hill in order to see the sights of the nation's capitol or to get down to business and pass meaningful, historic legislation. With the help of his campaign manage and the K-street lobbyist who has a change of heart, the boy passes legislation for his home town and returns to a hero's parade
KIDS FIRST!® Adult Jurors say - The script gives value to a young boy's wish to make things better for his mom and he also provides for the community. His goal is for advanced farming technology to be given to them. Perhaps an unlikely achievement for a ten-year-old, the story nonetheless allows for the possibility of such a thing happening. The young man uses his intelligence and alertness of what is around him, does not give up, listens to his good older friend as a guide, and stays with the truth of his goal. I give this screenplay 4 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 10 to 18, plus adults. Reviewed by Juror #11.
KIDS FIRST!® Kid Jurors say - The script gives value to a young boy's wish to make things better for his mom and he also provides for the community. His goal is for advanced farming technology to be given to them. Perhaps an unlikely achievement for a ten-year-old, the story nonetheless allows for the possibility of such a thing happening. The young man uses his intelligence and alertness of what is around him, does not give up, listens to his good older friend as a guide, and stays with the truth of his goal. I give this screenplay 4 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 10 to 18, plus adults. Reviewed by Juror #11.
Juror Recommended Age: 10-18 Suggested Retail Price: $ Media:



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