Watch Kids' Reviews of
CLEVER PRANKSTERS

What to know:
CLEVER PRANKSTERS is in the KIDS FIRST! Film Festival - it may not be a regular, endorsed title
Recommended age 2-15
7 minutes
VIDEO
DALA ANIMATION
Listen to reviews on our radio show Listen to KIDS FIRST! Radio Coming Attractions on VoiceAmerica
CLEVER PRANKSTERS cover image
Clever Pranksters educates and enthralls viewers. Rich in Kazakh culture and beautifully animated, each character has its own special personality, accentuated by unique voice talent and an easy to follow plot.

In the Alatau mountains of Kazakhstan, four neighbors and friends, Maral, Bulan, Suyr and Insin are preparing for the Nauryz Festival, marking the beginning of spring and the Persian New Year. The four build an altybakan swing and are looking forward to eating special Nauryz kozhe, but Maral, Suyr and Insin's impatience nearly ruins the holiday.

I did not know much about Kazakh traditions, and this show enlightened me about how Kazakhs celebrate Nauryz. Additionally, even though the characters are animals, they show human values which makes watching the show even more fun and relatable. The animation is well executed; the shots of the friends' village in the mountains are picturesque, and the motion graphics (while not reflecting real life) are engaging as well. The characters have some exaggerated movements, but its fun for a kids' animated short. The show is set in the Central Asian country of Kazakhstan, but one wouldn't necessarily know from the animation, as it could be set in any hilly area. The universality of the setting is a bit at odds with the plot, which focuses heavily on Kazakh culture. I would have appreciated a more definitively Central Asian backdrop, but it's lovely nonetheless. The sets are well animated, with some lifelike plants and houses, and other details that stretch your imagination. The background music doesn't necessarily drive the action of the film. It's a flute piece with a constant tempo throughout the film and seems like stock music. On the other hand, the title track is carefully composed by Galymzhan Sekeev and sung by Yerzet Ramazanov. It's my favorite piece of music in the film, but I wish it had subtitles. Dinara Abikeeva, Tolykn Nurbekova and Daniyar Bazarkulov are the voice actors in this film. They provide a unique dimension to each character, speaking clearly, with some unique twists depending on the character. Though the film is in Kazakh, their clear diction lines up perfectly with the closed captions, making the film an easy watch. It's evident that the producer, Bakytkyzy Moldir, and director, Dilshat Rakhmatullin, have taken the utmost care in weaving together the film. I love the final scene of the film, with the constructed altybakan and bright colorful lights gleaming as the sky darkens. It's a lovely ending that brings the plot and several themes of the film together.

The message is "haste makes wastem" as Bulan says. Also, the film promotes cultural appreciation of Nauryz and Kazakh traditions. It does show kids doing risky things that kids might imitate such as when the characters are shown trying to play on a half-built swing.

I give this one 5 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 4 to 14. The film is educational and fun to watch; it's sure to be a hit with families across the globe! By Eshaan M., KIDS FIRST!

Clever Pranksters educates and enthralls viewers. Rich in Kazakh culture and beautifully animated, each character has its own special personality, accentuated by unique voice talent and an easy to follow plot.

In the Alatau mountains of Kazakhstan, four neighbors and friends, Maral, Bulan, Suyr and Insin are preparing for the Nauryz Festival, marking the beginning of spring and the Persian New Year. The four build an altybakan swing and are looking forward to eating special Nauryz kozhe, but Maral, Suyr and Insin's impatience nearly ruins the holiday.

I did not know much about Kazakh traditions, and this show enlightened me about how Kazakhs celebrate Nauryz. Additionally, even though the characters are animals, they show human values which makes watching the show even more fun and relatable. The animation is well executed; the shots of the friends' village in the mountains are picturesque, and the motion graphics (while not reflecting real life) are engaging as well. The characters have some exaggerated movements, but its fun for a kids' animated short. The show is set in the Central Asian country of Kazakhstan, but one wouldn't necessarily know from the animation, as it could be set in any hilly area. The universality of the setting is a bit at odds with the plot, which focuses heavily on Kazakh culture. I would have appreciated a more definitively Central Asian backdrop, but it's lovely nonetheless. The sets are well animated, with some lifelike plants and houses, and other details that stretch your imagination. The background music doesn't necessarily drive the action of the film. It's a flute piece with a constant tempo throughout the film and seems like stock music. On the other hand, the title track is carefully composed by Galymzhan Sekeev and sung by Yerzet Ramazanov. It's my favorite piece of music in the film, but I wish it had subtitles. Dinara Abikeeva, Tolykn Nurbekova and Daniyar Bazarkulov are the voice actors in this film. They provide a unique dimension to each character, speaking clearly, with some unique twists depending on the character. Though the film is in Kazakh, their clear diction lines up perfectly with the closed captions, making the film an easy watch. It's evident that the producer, Bakytkyzy Moldir, and director, Dilshat Rakhmatullin, have taken the utmost care in weaving together the film. I love the final scene of the film, with the constructed altybakan and bright colorful lights gleaming as the sky darkens. It's a lovely ending that brings the plot and several themes of the film together.

The message is "haste makes wastem" as Bulan says. Also, the film promotes cultural appreciation of Nauryz and Kazakh traditions. It does show kids doing risky things that kids might imitate such as when the characters are shown trying to play on a half-built swing.

I give this one 5 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 4 to 14. The film is educational and fun to watch; it's sure to be a hit with families across the globe! By Eshaan M., KIDS FIRST!

High in the foothills of the Alatau Mountains, four friends - Maral, Bulan, Suyr, and Insin, who are thick as thieves, live next to each other. Every day the little kids play in their cosy village, constantly learning about the world, exploring their surroundings and making discoveries. Every day the little animals have exciting adventures, go on fascinating hikes, play various games and of course learn many new things. Friends and mentors, who they meet along the way, help them to learn about the world around them. These are the representatives of fauna inhabiting the steppes, mountains and forests of Kazakhstan. In this series, the animals build an Altybakan (swing) and prepare for Nauryz, but because of their misunderstanding, they almost ruin the holiday, however, the wise Bulan helps his friends resolve the conflict and celebrate Nauryz.
You too can become a film critic!
KIDS FIRST! Goes Local: Submit a review & win!

NEW SEARCH
Kid movie news & Free DVDs:
Join KIDS FIRST! on Twitter Join KIDS FIRST! on YouTube Join KIDS FIRST! on Instagram Join KIDS FIRST! on Facebook Join KIDS FIRST! on Pinterest