Watch Kids' Reviews of
DUKHA, THE

What to know:
DUKHA, THE is in the KIDS FIRST! Film Festival - it may not be a regular, endorsed title
Recommended age 8-14
8 minutes
VIDEO
CARMEN MORROW/ZACH WOLF
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DUKHA, THE cover image
The Dukha is a beautifully shot, enjoyable and educational documentary that explores a topic that few think of. The film is a mix of stop motion scenes and live action shots - a mix that could go wrong, but certainly doesn't in this film!

This short film is about one of the last groups of nomadic reindeer herders in the world - the Mongolian Dukha tribe. The film focuses on their way of life, how reindeers came to live with humans, and discusses the life of five-year old Tuvshuu, who may be destined to be one of the last reindeer herders.

The idea behind The Dukha is amazing and well executed. There is a compartmentalized focus on who the Dukha are, how reindeer came to live with them, and all about Tuvshuu and the path ahead of him. At times I wished that they had focused on one of these three things, rather than dividing our attention between them. It would have been more enlightening to see some interviews with other Dukha or to learn more about how they interact with the reindeer.

I learned a bit about the Mongols in my world history class and took a tiny bit of knowledge of nomadic life into the film, but realized how much of a difference there is between seeing nomadic life in action and reading about it in a textbook. The filmmakers have captured the raw, deep essence of life of these nomads in the high Mongolian altitudes. I love the shots of the Dukha interacting with their reindeer, and of course, seeing Tuvshuu and other kids learning how to ride reindeer is super adorable.

The film is set in the picturesque mountains of Mongolia; it's a beautiful backdrop for a film, with lush green pastures in the temperate summertime. There are several shots inside the Dukha's colorful tents and well lit tents. Truly unique; no two tents are the same. The music in the film is one-of-a-kind, with lilting tunes that accentuae the tone of the film. In especially happy scenes, the music rises in volume and there are often some interesting beats thrown in. There are some stop motion scenes throughout the film, especially at the beginning and during vignettes of myths or tales. These add some flavor to the film and are seamlessly executed. Most of these scenes involve some background noises, like a flowing freshwater stream. The background noises are clearly recorded and cut together well. Just for the cuteness factor, Tuvshuu, the young five-year-old nomad, stands out the most in this film. Directors Carmen Morrow and Zach Wolf also deserve to be commended for their work in researching, shooting and editing this film; it's truly a beautiful piece of art! I learned more about the nomadic way of life of the Dukha and how reindeer live among them. My favorite scene is watching a young child mounting a reindeer with his mother's help and experiencing a massive thrill when the reindeer follows his directions and moves forward. That was so heartwarming!

By spotlighting the Dukha, the film aims to educate viewers about a way of life that few know about and still remains.

I give this film 4 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 10 to 18, plus adults. This is a great educational film and makes you want to learn more about Mongolian nomads. Reviewed by Eshaan M. and Julie S., KIDS FIRST!

The Dukha is a beautifully shot, enjoyable and educational documentary that explores a topic that few think of. The film is a mix of stop motion scenes and live action shots - a mix that could go wrong, but certainly doesn't in this film!

This short film is about one of the last groups of nomadic reindeer herders in the world - the Mongolian Dukha tribe. The film focuses on their way of life, how reindeers came to live with humans, and discusses the life of five-year old Tuvshuu, who may be destined to be one of the last reindeer herders.

The idea behind The Dukha is amazing and well executed. There is a compartmentalized focus on who the Dukha are, how reindeer came to live with them, and all about Tuvshuu and the path ahead of him. At times I wished that they had focused on one of these three things, rather than dividing our attention between them. It would have been more enlightening to see some interviews with other Dukha or to learn more about how they interact with the reindeer.

I learned a bit about the Mongols in my world history class and took a tiny bit of knowledge of nomadic life into the film, but realized how much of a difference there is between seeing nomadic life in action and reading about it in a textbook. The filmmakers have captured the raw, deep essence of life of these nomads in the high Mongolian altitudes. I love the shots of the Dukha interacting with their reindeer, and of course, seeing Tuvshuu and other kids learning how to ride reindeer is super adorable.

The film is set in the picturesque mountains of Mongolia; it's a beautiful backdrop for a film, with lush green pastures in the temperate summertime. There are several shots inside the Dukha's colorful tents and well lit tents. Truly unique; no two tents are the same. The music in the film is one-of-a-kind, with lilting tunes that accentuae the tone of the film. In especially happy scenes, the music rises in volume and there are often some interesting beats thrown in. There are some stop motion scenes throughout the film, especially at the beginning and during vignettes of myths or tales. These add some flavor to the film and are seamlessly executed. Most of these scenes involve some background noises, like a flowing freshwater stream. The background noises are clearly recorded and cut together well. Just for the cuteness factor, Tuvshuu, the young five-year-old nomad, stands out the most in this film. Directors Carmen Morrow and Zach Wolf also deserve to be commended for their work in researching, shooting and editing this film; it's truly a beautiful piece of art! I learned more about the nomadic way of life of the Dukha and how reindeer live among them. My favorite scene is watching a young child mounting a reindeer with his mother's help and experiencing a massive thrill when the reindeer follows his directions and moves forward. That was so heartwarming!

By spotlighting the Dukha, the film aims to educate viewers about a way of life that few know about and still remains.

I give this film 4 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 10 to 18, plus adults. This is a great educational film and makes you want to learn more about Mongolian nomads. Reviewed by Eshaan M. and Julie S., KIDS FIRST!

In the remote taiga of northern Mongolia live the Dukha, one of the last groups of nomadic reindeer herders in the world. Tuvshuu is five years old. He and his sisters help with their family's herd at the summer camp, where there are cool winds and plenty of grass. Their way of life and knowledge of reindeer has been passed down for millennia. With less than 40 Dukha families left in the world, Tuvshuu will have some big decisions ahead.
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