Watch Kids' Reviews of
DR. DADDY

What to know:
DR. DADDY is in the KIDS FIRST! Film Festival - it may not be a regular, endorsed title
Recommended age 2-8
6 minutes
VIDEO
SOEUN PARK
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DR. DADDY cover image
Dr. Daddy skillfully balances a message of family and bravery with loss and suffering in only six minutes. The music and production are simple, yet are thoughtfully incorporated to let the storyline and acting shine. As I watched the ending, the message changes the light-hearted tone of the film to one of pain. The connection that I made with the main character in only a few minutes enhanced the emotional effect of the ending. Dr. Daddy has a clear goal to convey, which guides the directors, actors, writers and production team to success.

Directed, produced and written by Soeun Park, Dr. Daddy follows Carrie Lee (Kyriana Kratter), a young girl who is excited to speak to her father Henry Lee (Henry Mark) who is also a doctor during the COVID-19 pandemic.

I like that the story is well thought out, because the ending illuminates certain scenes that seem mysterious or foreboding. For example, during an online video call, Henry mutes and goes off camera for a moment. Later, we discover Henry has COVID-19 and is trying to hide it from his daughter. Another heartbreaking scene occurs as Henry promises to make his daughter her favorite dish when he comes home, but the reality of the situation is that he might never be able to. Within six minutes, the writer masterfully designs a short film that offers a tribute to the healthcare workers on the frontlines of COVID-19 in a subtle way. The message left me thinking about the doctor's bravery and sacrifices long after it had finished. The camera work is primarily focus on the actors' faces for most of the film. These close-ups allowed the viewer to feel deeply for the characters and their conversation, leading to an emotional bond with them. After only a few minutes, I already felt as if I understood them and their personalities. The end shot zooms out from the father and reveals that he most likely has COVID-19. As the shot backs away from him, we see that Henry is in his car on a deserted street, a worrisome image that shows how isolated he is. The cinematography escalates the emotions of the story while illuminating certain facts that convey its message. Watching the father and daughter communicate via an online video call was prominent for many families during the pandemic. Furthermore, I expected Henry to at the hospital, yet seeing him in his car depicts his struggles. It is used as a kind of "show-not-tell" to indicate what Henry is going through and is very successful in doing so. There are only two instances where background music is used - the beginning and the end. And in both cases it is well executed and appropriate to the story. The music at the start is uplifting and joyous while the music at the end is solemn. The juxtaposition between these two tones highlights the gravity of the situation, because the uplifting tone is representative of Carrie's excitement to see her father while the solemn tone is representative of Henry's worrisome future. Therefore, despite the background score's simplicity, it is used effectively to convey a deeper meaning of family and the bravery of frontline healthcare workers. Kyriana Kratter plays Carrie Lee and she grabbed my attention from the start. She rushes into the room and her excitement is easily visible. She made me curious as to why she was excited and what story I was about to enter. Kyriana continues her mastery of acting as she speaks with her father in the story, successfully exhibiting a wide range of emotions from worry to joy. Henry Mark plays Henry Lee. He also kept me engaged because it seems as if he was hiding something throughout his conversation with his daughter. He maintains a certain dignity throughout the conversation with his daughter and afterwards, his face becomes solemn. It is implied that he has COVID-19 through his terrible cough and the shift in his character is clear and well communicated. Soeun Park's clear vision and message elevates the simplicity of the acting, production, music and locations. She utilizes every aspect of the production so that it engages and elicits a thought-provoking response from the audience. Additionally, while each aspect tells us something new about the story, they are all united by a common theme that gives the film the final bang it needs to make an impact. The film begins from the perspective of Carrie Lee and thus, the music, cinematography and sets are focused on Carrie's side of the story. However, it ends from Henry's perspective and thus, the music, cinematography and sets are focused on his side of the story. The stark contrast engenders the separation of father and daughter and the comfort of their video call falls away, leaving the viewer to revisit the meaning of the call. My favorite part of the film was watching Carrie and seeing her sweet character. She feels very authentic and her puns made me quickly warm up to her.

The message is that throughout the COVID-19 pandemic, frontline healthcare workers have exhibited bravery and strength as they have left their families and risked their lives for the wellbeing of others. Since Henry, the doctor, is Asian American, the film also addresses the Asian American violence that began when COVID-19 was suspected to have originated in China.

I give Dr. Daddy 4.5 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 7 to 16. I recommend it for the KIDS FIRST! Film Festival because it delivers an important message of inclusivity while unveiling the harsh realities of COVID-19. It caters to a younger audience as the main actress is a young, bright child who loves making puns and telling silly jokes. Yet, it seeks to expand the perspective of the young audience by revealing the plight of her father who is suffering from COVID-19 despite his calm and kind exterior. This qualifies as an Asian American or pandemic special interest topic. Reviewed by Sahiba K., KIDS FIRST!

Dr. Daddy skillfully balances a message of family and bravery with loss and suffering in only six minutes. The music and production are simple, yet are thoughtfully incorporated to let the storyline and acting shine. As I watched the ending, the message changes the light-hearted tone of the film to one of pain. The connection that I made with the main character in only a few minutes enhanced the emotional effect of the ending. Dr. Daddy has a clear goal to convey, which guides the directors, actors, writers and production team to success.

Directed, produced and written by Soeun Park, Dr. Daddy follows Carrie Lee (Kyriana Kratter), a young girl who is excited to speak to her father Henry Lee (Henry Mark) who is also a doctor during the COVID-19 pandemic.

I like that the story is well thought out, because the ending illuminates certain scenes that seem mysterious or foreboding. For example, during an online video call, Henry mutes and goes off camera for a moment. Later, we discover Henry has COVID-19 and is trying to hide it from his daughter. Another heartbreaking scene occurs as Henry promises to make his daughter her favorite dish when he comes home, but the reality of the situation is that he might never be able to. Within six minutes, the writer masterfully designs a short film that offers a tribute to the healthcare workers on the frontlines of COVID-19 in a subtle way. The message left me thinking about the doctor's bravery and sacrifices long after it had finished. The camera work is primarily focus on the actors' faces for most of the film. These close-ups allowed the viewer to feel deeply for the characters and their conversation, leading to an emotional bond with them. After only a few minutes, I already felt as if I understood them and their personalities. The end shot zooms out from the father and reveals that he most likely has COVID-19. As the shot backs away from him, we see that Henry is in his car on a deserted street, a worrisome image that shows how isolated he is. The cinematography escalates the emotions of the story while illuminating certain facts that convey its message. Watching the father and daughter communicate via an online video call was prominent for many families during the pandemic. Furthermore, I expected Henry to at the hospital, yet seeing him in his car depicts his struggles. It is used as a kind of "show-not-tell" to indicate what Henry is going through and is very successful in doing so. There are only two instances where background music is used - the beginning and the end. And in both cases it is well executed and appropriate to the story. The music at the start is uplifting and joyous while the music at the end is solemn. The juxtaposition between these two tones highlights the gravity of the situation, because the uplifting tone is representative of Carrie's excitement to see her father while the solemn tone is representative of Henry's worrisome future. Therefore, despite the background score's simplicity, it is used effectively to convey a deeper meaning of family and the bravery of frontline healthcare workers. Kyriana Kratter plays Carrie Lee and she grabbed my attention from the start. She rushes into the room and her excitement is easily visible. She made me curious as to why she was excited and what story I was about to enter. Kyriana continues her mastery of acting as she speaks with her father in the story, successfully exhibiting a wide range of emotions from worry to joy. Henry Mark plays Henry Lee. He also kept me engaged because it seems as if he was hiding something throughout his conversation with his daughter. He maintains a certain dignity throughout the conversation with his daughter and afterwards, his face becomes solemn. It is implied that he has COVID-19 through his terrible cough and the shift in his character is clear and well communicated. Soeun Park's clear vision and message elevates the simplicity of the acting, production, music and locations. She utilizes every aspect of the production so that it engages and elicits a thought-provoking response from the audience. Additionally, while each aspect tells us something new about the story, they are all united by a common theme that gives the film the final bang it needs to make an impact. The film begins from the perspective of Carrie Lee and thus, the music, cinematography and sets are focused on Carrie's side of the story. However, it ends from Henry's perspective and thus, the music, cinematography and sets are focused on his side of the story. The stark contrast engenders the separation of father and daughter and the comfort of their video call falls away, leaving the viewer to revisit the meaning of the call. My favorite part of the film was watching Carrie and seeing her sweet character. She feels very authentic and her puns made me quickly warm up to her.

The message is that throughout the COVID-19 pandemic, frontline healthcare workers have exhibited bravery and strength as they have left their families and risked their lives for the wellbeing of others. Since Henry, the doctor, is Asian American, the film also addresses the Asian American violence that began when COVID-19 was suspected to have originated in China.

I give Dr. Daddy 4.5 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 7 to 16. I recommend it for the KIDS FIRST! Film Festival because it delivers an important message of inclusivity while unveiling the harsh realities of COVID-19. It caters to a younger audience as the main actress is a young, bright child who loves making puns and telling silly jokes. Yet, it seeks to expand the perspective of the young audience by revealing the plight of her father who is suffering from COVID-19 despite his calm and kind exterior. This qualifies as an Asian American or pandemic special interest topic. Reviewed by Sahiba K., KIDS FIRST!

A little girl misses her father, a doctor, who is unable to be with her during the 2020 Covid-19 pandemic.
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