Watch Kids' Reviews of
JUST ONE DAY

What to know:
JUST ONE DAY is in the KIDS FIRST! Film Festival - it may not be a regular, endorsed title
Recommended age 8-14
11 minutes
VIDEO
ETHAN DANIELS AND PEYTON J EVANS
Listen to reviews on our radio show Listen to KIDS FIRST! Radio Coming Attractions on VoiceAmerica
JUST ONE DAY cover image
Just One Day is a student made film that provides a powerful message against bullying as it focuses on the root causes of bullying and ways to handle conflict. I think it's very current for today's youth and a provides useful information and advice.

The storyline follows two middle school boys - a bully and his victim - who learn to interact despite their differences.

The subject matter is topical, since bullying affects children and teens daily. Showcasing the lives of bullies and those targeted, provides insight on their behavior. It provides ways to react to conflict, such as remaining calm, speaking to an adult and keeping the bully aware of their actions; which are great lessons reinforced in the film.

I like the film's use of symbolism through color. It uses two colored filters - yellow for joy and blue for sadness - to tell the story from each character's perspective. Charlie, the child being bullied, has a yellow tint and his bully, Nathan has blue. That subtle edit allows the viewer to follow each character without vocal queues or angle changes.

The film uses piano instrumentals and the featured song, "Just One Day," performed by Sarah Leaf and Chooka Parker, compliments the serious tone of the film very well. I particularly enjoyed the use of the color filters highlighting each character's point of view. The film focuses on Charlie (Merrick Adams) and Nathan (Stefan Ivutin), Charlie's bully. They meet each other in middle school, where Charlie is instantly targeted by Nathan. Charlie chastises Nathan's behavior which Nathan defends by explaining the connection between his toxic home life and jealousy of Charlie's family. Charlie offers emotional support which incites an apology from Nathan. They reconcile and become friends. The writer/directors, Ethan Daniels and Peyton J. Evans (ages 14 and 12) were both victims of bullying when they were younger. In the segment after the film, they provide resources for those being bullied and explain why bullying isn't ok. My favorite part is when Charlie and Nathan become friends and Nathan's blue-tinted world turns yellow.

The message is that change can happen, sometimes in just one day. It teaches good conflict resolution skills and provides resources to mitigate the effects of bullying.

I give this film 5 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 8 to 14, plus adults. Reviewed by Imani C., KIDS FIRST!

Just One Day is a student made film that provides a powerful message against bullying as it focuses on the root causes of bullying and ways to handle conflict. I think it's very current for today's youth and a provides useful information and advice.

The storyline follows two middle school boys - a bully and his victim - who learn to interact despite their differences.

The subject matter is topical, since bullying affects children and teens daily. Showcasing the lives of bullies and those targeted, provides insight on their behavior. It provides ways to react to conflict, such as remaining calm, speaking to an adult and keeping the bully aware of their actions; which are great lessons reinforced in the film.

I like the film's use of symbolism through color. It uses two colored filters - yellow for joy and blue for sadness - to tell the story from each character's perspective. Charlie, the child being bullied, has a yellow tint and his bully, Nathan has blue. That subtle edit allows the viewer to follow each character without vocal queues or angle changes.

The film uses piano instrumentals and the featured song, "Just One Day," performed by Sarah Leaf and Chooka Parker, compliments the serious tone of the film very well. I particularly enjoyed the use of the color filters highlighting each character's point of view. The film focuses on Charlie (Merrick Adams) and Nathan (Stefan Ivutin), Charlie's bully. They meet each other in middle school, where Charlie is instantly targeted by Nathan. Charlie chastises Nathan's behavior which Nathan defends by explaining the connection between his toxic home life and jealousy of Charlie's family. Charlie offers emotional support which incites an apology from Nathan. They reconcile and become friends. The writer/directors, Ethan Daniels and Peyton J. Evans (ages 14 and 12) were both victims of bullying when they were younger. In the segment after the film, they provide resources for those being bullied and explain why bullying isn't ok. My favorite part is when Charlie and Nathan become friends and Nathan's blue-tinted world turns yellow.

The message is that change can happen, sometimes in just one day. It teaches good conflict resolution skills and provides resources to mitigate the effects of bullying.

I give this film 5 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 8 to 14, plus adults. Reviewed by Imani C., KIDS FIRST!

Bullying is a major problem with kids and teens today. This film follows 2 boys with very different home lives through their first day at school. It will show that change can happen in just one day.
You too can become a film critic!
KIDS FIRST! Goes Local: Submit a review & win!

NEW SEARCH
Kid movie news & Free DVDs:
Join KIDS FIRST! on Twitter Join KIDS FIRST! on YouTube Join KIDS FIRST! on Instagram Join KIDS FIRST! on Facebook Join KIDS FIRST! on Pinterest