Watch Kids' Reviews of
MUSIC IS LIFE

What to know: Great watch.
MUSIC IS LIFE is in the KIDS FIRST! Film Festival - it may not be a regular, endorsed title
Recommended age 11-18
6 minutes
VIDEO
MARC KORNBLATT
Listen to reviews on our radio show Listen to KIDS FIRST! Radio Coming Attractions on VoiceAmerica
MUSIC IS LIFE cover image
Music is Life is a well-produced documentary about a great cause, and it's certainly a great watch! The crisp camera work and editing combine with the unique premise of the film to form a superb package.

The film follows volunteers at Elifelet that work with refugee children in Israel, offering them a safe haven and the gift of music.

Music is Life is a beautiful film with a sweet message; I love the premise of sharing the joy of music and providing free instruments to those who have not had anything to their name ever since they had to flee their homeland. Elifelet is a great organization and it's portrayed wonderfully as well. The cinematography is clean and crisp and, though there are not any remarkably novel shots, the close-ups of children waiting and looking in awe at Epstein as he shows them how to play a piece are some of the most evocative shots. The editing is also noteworthy. I found the ending sequence where the children are performing and the credits flashing in between (synchronized with the music) to be a unique concept which actually made me watch the credits all the way through.

The costumes suit the storyline. The film is set in a children's home in Shapira, a quiet section of southern Tel Aviv, Israel. It is set in a place I wouldn't have expected, since I didn't know much about the refugee situation in Israel outside of the Palestine-Israel conflict. Greece? Sure. Turkey? Sure. But Israel? Not really. The background music consists completely of the music that the children or Epstein play and it's unique to hear music with flaws in it. The children aren't going to get every detail of the songs right and, though it is jarring at first, I grew to appreciate the music. It's a documentary, so there are no characters per se. Joel Epstein, the music teacher, is clear both in his delivery of instructions to students and in his interview, which helps viewers get a peek into his life.

Marc Kornblatt is the director, writer and producer. He shines the most in his role as producer, with impeccable editing and sound mixing, but also as a director, thinking up a unique concept and filming it with such grace. I was made more aware of the many refugee children from around the world currently in Israel. I love the scene where Epstein is teaching an African refugee how to play his instrument - they seem to be having so much fun while sharing their passion.

The message is that music is one of the greatest gifts in the world.

I give this film 4.5 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 11 to 18, plus adults. The high production quality and beautiful message make this film a great choice for a youth and family film festival. Reviewed by Eshaan M., KIDS FIRST!

Music is Life is a well-produced documentary about a great cause, and it's certainly a great watch! The crisp camera work and editing combine with the unique premise of the film to form a superb package.

The film follows volunteers at Elifelet that work with refugee children in Israel, offering them a safe haven and the gift of music.

Music is Life is a beautiful film with a sweet message; I love the premise of sharing the joy of music and providing free instruments to those who have not had anything to their name ever since they had to flee their homeland. Elifelet is a great organization and it's portrayed wonderfully as well. The cinematography is clean and crisp and, though there are not any remarkably novel shots, the close-ups of children waiting and looking in awe at Epstein as he shows them how to play a piece are some of the most evocative shots. The editing is also noteworthy. I found the ending sequence where the children are performing and the credits flashing in between (synchronized with the music) to be a unique concept which actually made me watch the credits all the way through.

The costumes suit the storyline. The film is set in a children's home in Shapira, a quiet section of southern Tel Aviv, Israel. It is set in a place I wouldn't have expected, since I didn't know much about the refugee situation in Israel outside of the Palestine-Israel conflict. Greece? Sure. Turkey? Sure. But Israel? Not really. The background music consists completely of the music that the children or Epstein play and it's unique to hear music with flaws in it. The children aren't going to get every detail of the songs right and, though it is jarring at first, I grew to appreciate the music. It's a documentary, so there are no characters per se. Joel Epstein, the music teacher, is clear both in his delivery of instructions to students and in his interview, which helps viewers get a peek into his life.

Marc Kornblatt is the director, writer and producer. He shines the most in his role as producer, with impeccable editing and sound mixing, but also as a director, thinking up a unique concept and filming it with such grace. I was made more aware of the many refugee children from around the world currently in Israel. I love the scene where Epstein is teaching an African refugee how to play his instrument - they seem to be having so much fun while sharing their passion.

The message is that music is one of the greatest gifts in the world.

I give this film 4.5 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 11 to 18, plus adults. The high production quality and beautiful message make this film a great choice for a youth and family film festival. Reviewed by Eshaan M., KIDS FIRST!

Volunteers work with stateless refugee children in southern Tel Aviv, offering them a safe haven and the gift of music.
You too can become a film critic!
KIDS FIRST! Goes Local: Submit a review & win!

NEW SEARCH
Kid movie news & Free DVDs:
Join KIDS FIRST! on Twitter Join KIDS FIRST! on YouTube Join KIDS FIRST! on Instagram Join KIDS FIRST! on Facebook Join KIDS FIRST! on Pinterest