Watch Kids' Reviews of
FLYMAN, THE

What to know: Sweet film.
FLYMAN, THE is in the KIDS FIRST! Film Festival - it may not be a regular, endorsed title
Recommended age 6-12
10 minutes
VIDEO
ROOPAL KEWALYA
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FLYMAN, THE cover image
A sweet film, The Flyman succeeds in using a unique concept to drive home a message of courage. The film is shot beautifully, using light to convey subtle messages of good and evil, and with a natural script. It's certainly a must-watch.

The story follows an 8-year-old boy named Vihaan who aspires to become a superhero called Flyman. He sees Flyman as strong and indomitable, because he wants to escape Bull Boy, the boy who hits him in school. But, he has to defeat Gravity and subdue his internal turmoil to achieve this goal.

Though it begins without much introduction, The Flyman has an easy-to-follow plot that many kids that have bullied can relate to, with deep emotions which are expressed wonderfully by each character, and a hard-hitting message. The cinematography is spectacular; one of my favorite shots is when the camera team uses light and space to provide the illusion of flight. The costumes suit the storyline. Set in India, the film's sets don't have as much of an impact on the story, though they do suit it. The score is your classic superhero film soundtrack, with trumpet fanfares and lively beats, though music is minimal. It's certainly more of an action and character-driven short film as compared to a music-driven film.

Zachary Braz puts on a compelling performance as Vihaan, and any child that has sought refuge in their imagination after being bullied or suffering in some other way can relate to him. Pallas Prajapati plays Akshat, aka Bull Boy, and he really channels his inner antagonist when delivering his lines. Finally, Leysha Mange plays Aalia, Vihaan's sister, whose superhero name is Gravity, as Vihaan believes she is the reason that he cannot fly. She has fewer lines than the boys, but supports Vihaan well, swooping in at the end of the film as a savior-figure. The director, writer and producer Roopal Kewalya was inspired to create this film by her son who was afraid to go to school because of a bully. Her conviction to the messaging of this film shows in how impeccably the whole audiovisual package of the film comes together. The script was likely inspired by conversations she has had with her son and, the evocative shots of Vihaan dejectedly walking down a school hallway or trying to channel his inner superhero were probably inspired by Kewalya's superhero-loving son and his experiences. I love the scene on the school terrace because Vihaan shows a totally different side of himself as he stands up to Bull Boy in his own unique way. I won't give you any further details, but I certainly recommend you watch it! I love that his superpower is "facing my fears!"

The message is that if you conquer your fears, anything is possible. Be aware that it does show kids doing risky things that kids might imitate. Flyman realizes that kids really can fly if they overcome their fears and the end shot shows him jumping off his bed and successfully "flying." That is a risky move that kids might imitate.

I give this film 4.5 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 6 to 12. It has a great plot, message and production. Reviewed by Eshaan M., KIDS FIRST!

A sweet film, The Flyman succeeds in using a unique concept to drive home a message of courage. The film is shot beautifully, using light to convey subtle messages of good and evil, and with a natural script. It's certainly a must-watch.

The story follows an 8-year-old boy named Vihaan who aspires to become a superhero called Flyman. He sees Flyman as strong and indomitable, because he wants to escape Bull Boy, the boy who hits him in school. But, he has to defeat Gravity and subdue his internal turmoil to achieve this goal.

Though it begins without much introduction, The Flyman has an easy-to-follow plot that many kids that have bullied can relate to, with deep emotions which are expressed wonderfully by each character, and a hard-hitting message. The cinematography is spectacular; one of my favorite shots is when the camera team uses light and space to provide the illusion of flight. The costumes suit the storyline. Set in India, the film's sets don't have as much of an impact on the story, though they do suit it. The score is your classic superhero film soundtrack, with trumpet fanfares and lively beats, though music is minimal. It's certainly more of an action and character-driven short film as compared to a music-driven film.

Zachary Braz puts on a compelling performance as Vihaan, and any child that has sought refuge in their imagination after being bullied or suffering in some other way can relate to him. Pallas Prajapati plays Akshat, aka Bull Boy, and he really channels his inner antagonist when delivering his lines. Finally, Leysha Mange plays Aalia, Vihaan's sister, whose superhero name is Gravity, as Vihaan believes she is the reason that he cannot fly. She has fewer lines than the boys, but supports Vihaan well, swooping in at the end of the film as a savior-figure. The director, writer and producer Roopal Kewalya was inspired to create this film by her son who was afraid to go to school because of a bully. Her conviction to the messaging of this film shows in how impeccably the whole audiovisual package of the film comes together. The script was likely inspired by conversations she has had with her son and, the evocative shots of Vihaan dejectedly walking down a school hallway or trying to channel his inner superhero were probably inspired by Kewalya's superhero-loving son and his experiences. I love the scene on the school terrace because Vihaan shows a totally different side of himself as he stands up to Bull Boy in his own unique way. I won't give you any further details, but I certainly recommend you watch it! I love that his superpower is "facing my fears!"

The message is that if you conquer your fears, anything is possible. Be aware that it does show kids doing risky things that kids might imitate. Flyman realizes that kids really can fly if they overcome their fears and the end shot shows him jumping off his bed and successfully "flying." That is a risky move that kids might imitate.

I give this film 4.5 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 6 to 12. It has a great plot, message and production. Reviewed by Eshaan M., KIDS FIRST!

An 8 year old boy wants to become The Flyman because he wants to escape Bull Boy, the boy who hits him in school but the one thing stopping him from flying is Gravity.
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