Watch Kids' Reviews of
RUMPA

What to know:
RUMPA is in the KIDS FIRST! Film Festival - it may not be a regular, endorsed title
Recommended age 12-18
14 minutes
VIDEO
BENTE MAALEN
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RUMPA cover image
What I like about Rumpa is that we watch a young girl standing up to her idol and for what she believes. She is not afraid to say what she believes about him, even though she used to idolize him. She stands up in front of the whole class when she knows that she will be made fun of and tells the entire class that what her idol was saying was wrong.

A young girl's idol comes into her class. She does not agree with what he says when talking in a character and tells the class that.

I like that the storyline gives context for why the young girl acts the way she does. It follows a story arc that makes sense. The camera work is very good. The shots in the bathroom stall impressed me the most, because we see both the young girl and her best friend in two separate stalls talking through the wall, which makes it more dramatic. The sets suit the story; it takes place in a school. The music when the protagonist is daydreaming enhances the feelings she has towards the actor at that time. The music is dramatic and kind of romantic. I particularly like the ending song. Pauline (Milla Reppen-Gjelseth)'s character development is well sequenced; you can tell that she has idolized the actor for a long time and we also see that she does not like to be made fun of. Her speech to him is spot on, well delivered. I especially like when she calls him on thinking that Ophelia's suicide is romantic - and points out how it is an issue with teens today. That is very well spoken and poignant. Martin's (Siver Sablagi-Eltoft) character development also is handled well; from the beginning you can tell that he is in love with Pauline and it develops naturally throughout the short film. The story flows very well. My favorite part of the film is the ending because it shows that her best friend is there for her always. The dialogue is in Norwegian with English subtitles.

The message is to stand up for what you believe. There is some partial nudity when one character has his shirt off; another person is in front of him so you hardly notice it.

I give Rumpa 4.5 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 13 to 18, plus adults. By Lorelei T. and Julie S., KIDS FIRST!

What I like about Rumpa is that we watch a young girl standing up to her idol and for what she believes. She is not afraid to say what she believes about him, even though she used to idolize him. She stands up in front of the whole class when she knows that she will be made fun of and tells the entire class that what her idol was saying was wrong.

A young girl's idol comes into her class. She does not agree with what he says when talking in a character and tells the class that.

I like that the storyline gives context for why the young girl acts the way she does. It follows a story arc that makes sense. The camera work is very good. The shots in the bathroom stall impressed me the most, because we see both the young girl and her best friend in two separate stalls talking through the wall, which makes it more dramatic. The sets suit the story; it takes place in a school. The music when the protagonist is daydreaming enhances the feelings she has towards the actor at that time. The music is dramatic and kind of romantic. I particularly like the ending song. Pauline (Milla Reppen-Gjelseth)'s character development is well sequenced; you can tell that she has idolized the actor for a long time and we also see that she does not like to be made fun of. Her speech to him is spot on, well delivered. I especially like when she calls him on thinking that Ophelia's suicide is romantic - and points out how it is an issue with teens today. That is very well spoken and poignant. Martin's (Siver Sablagi-Eltoft) character development also is handled well; from the beginning you can tell that he is in love with Pauline and it develops naturally throughout the short film. The story flows very well. My favorite part of the film is the ending because it shows that her best friend is there for her always. The dialogue is in Norwegian with English subtitles.

The message is to stand up for what you believe. There is some partial nudity when one character has his shirt off; another person is in front of him so you hardly notice it.

I give Rumpa 4.5 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 13 to 18, plus adults. By Lorelei T. and Julie S., KIDS FIRST!

Fifteen-year-old Pauline commits social suicide in class and in front of her idol, film star Ingvar Lykke, when she accidentally posts a private snap. But instead of dying of shame, she rebels against an ocean of unwritten rules.
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