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IN THE FOOTSTEPS OF THADDEUS THACKERAY

What to know: A Story Set In Two Different Worlds - The Fantasy World Of A 1940s Animated Movie Serial, And The Real World Of A Small Suburban American Town During WWII.
IN THE FOOTSTEPS OF THADDEUS THACKERAY is in the KIDS FIRST! Film Festival - it may not be a regular, endorsed title
Recommended age 8-12
115 minutes
Screenplay
ADAM MCDANIEL
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IN THE FOOTSTEPS OF THADDEUS THACKERAY is in the KIDS FIRST! Film Festival - it may not be a regular, endorsed title
This is a story set in two different worlds: the fantasy world of a 1940s animated movie serial, and the real world (if you dare call any movie setting "real") of a small suburban American town during WWII. To quote from the author: Script is a story set in two different worlds: the fantasy world of a 1940s animated movie serial, and the real world (if you dare call any movie setting "real") of a small suburban American town during WWII. Worlds can blend and one is wise not to "underestimate the power of love that can transcend life and death."

In spite of occasional seemingly excessive descriptions by the writer presenting the characters and scenes to the extent of directing, the script unfolds cleverly.

Script has commercial potential. Author presents his choice for animation throughout for both the 'movie reel' and the 'real world' as 'souls are interchanged and they have to live in different bodies.' The script provides sets from 'stone carved ancient tombs and caves' to alleys to school settings to WWII scenes. It is a vivid script where two young men belonging to different worlds make the same wish at the same time.

Key characters have unique qualities and dialogue. Judson (real world) is 14, big ears, buck teeth and loves adventure. Kenny, his friend, is smart, bored by the movie thinking it 'going downhill', shy with girls. Hunter, their bully is mean. Thaddeus, 17, (of the movie screen world) is short, scrawny, English dialect, an adventurer with his father's diary, Dublin McGinn is his friend, muscular, Indian Jones 'without the brains' but who proves himself invaluable. Debaucherie is sinister who wants to steal the crown from Thaddeus. Tone of the script is light, although there are deathly excursions with cobras, dismembered limbs floating like vines in the air, molten lava, and stolen Cadillacs. Yet within these moments each triumph is significant. There are continuous dialogues back and forth - amusing easy and sincere camaraderie. Even the inability of Kenny to dance and communicate with a girl is helped by his new friend Thaddeus, 'be sensitive to women'. Multiple ages would enjoy the action and emotional confidence developed in the characters. Each of the two heroes experiences a reunion with the energy of a deceased brother and parent. Thaddeus realizes that he is 'terrified that he won't always be able to save his friend, Dublin' He switched places because he wanted to be anywhere else than to see that happen. Judson allowed mean Hunter to take the rabbit's foot to save his friend Kenny. Two worlds, four different young men, two soul exchanges. The journey back home.

Pacing has been explained above. At times pacing is confusing and takes a very short detour due to the parallel stories existing side by side. The humor, especially the more streetwise of Judson, is fun and adds vitality and a good banter to the more formal speech of Thaddeus. Ultimately the story remains intact and a compelling read.

I give this screenplay 4.5 out of 5 stars and recommend for ages 8 to12, Juror #11, KIDS FIRST!

This is a story set in two different worlds: the fantasy world of a 1940s animated movie serial, and the real world (if you dare call any movie setting "real") of a small suburban American town during WWII. To quote from the author: Script is a story set in two different worlds: the fantasy world of a 1940s animated movie serial, and the real world (if you dare call any movie setting "real") of a small suburban American town during WWII. Worlds can blend and one is wise not to "underestimate the power of love that can transcend life and death."

In spite of occasional seemingly excessive descriptions by the writer presenting the characters and scenes to the extent of directing, the script unfolds cleverly.

Script has commercial potential. Author presents his choice for animation throughout for both the 'movie reel' and the 'real world' as 'souls are interchanged and they have to live in different bodies.' The script provides sets from 'stone carved ancient tombs and caves' to alleys to school settings to WWII scenes. It is a vivid script where two young men belonging to different worlds make the same wish at the same time.

Key characters have unique qualities and dialogue. Judson (real world) is 14, big ears, buck teeth and loves adventure. Kenny, his friend, is smart, bored by the movie thinking it 'going downhill', shy with girls. Hunter, their bully is mean. Thaddeus, 17, (of the movie screen world) is short, scrawny, English dialect, an adventurer with his father's diary, Dublin McGinn is his friend, muscular, Indian Jones 'without the brains' but who proves himself invaluable. Debaucherie is sinister who wants to steal the crown from Thaddeus. Tone of the script is light, although there are deathly excursions with cobras, dismembered limbs floating like vines in the air, molten lava, and stolen Cadillacs. Yet within these moments each triumph is significant. There are continuous dialogues back and forth - amusing easy and sincere camaraderie. Even the inability of Kenny to dance and communicate with a girl is helped by his new friend Thaddeus, 'be sensitive to women'. Multiple ages would enjoy the action and emotional confidence developed in the characters. Each of the two heroes experiences a reunion with the energy of a deceased brother and parent. Thaddeus realizes that he is 'terrified that he won't always be able to save his friend, Dublin' He switched places because he wanted to be anywhere else than to see that happen. Judson allowed mean Hunter to take the rabbit's foot to save his friend Kenny. Two worlds, four different young men, two soul exchanges. The journey back home.

Pacing has been explained above. At times pacing is confusing and takes a very short detour due to the parallel stories existing side by side. The humor, especially the more streetwise of Judson, is fun and adds vitality and a good banter to the more formal speech of Thaddeus. Ultimately the story remains intact and a compelling read.

I give this screenplay 4.5 out of 5 stars and recommend for ages 8 to12, Juror #11, KIDS FIRST!

Award-winning buddy comedy set in 1943, where 14 year-old Judson Conover dreams of sharing adventures with his favorite cartoon movie hero, Dublin McGinn. But when he mysteriously switches bodies with McGinn's comic sidekick, diminutive English teenage genius Thaddeus Thackeray, Judson realizes that surviving animated serials is MUCH harder than it looks. Meanwhile, Thackeray - lost within an all-too-real world at war - must figure out how to set things right. And the only one who can possibly help him is Judson's best friend, Kenny, who isn't quick to believe Thaddeus' rather fantastical story.
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