Watch Kids' Reviews of
PRISM, THE

What to know:
PRISM, THE is in the KIDS FIRST! Film Festival - it may not be a regular, endorsed title
Recommended age 6-18
21 minutes
VIDEO
ERIC WHITE
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PRISM, THE cover image
I enjoyed The Prism as it's a really moving film! The movie starts off with a relatively calm day with Ethan, who is a special kid that is obsessed with a prism that displays seven different colors and it makes him curious. The seven colors are symbols of choices and diversity, which help Ethan's dad realize that he can change his career path.

The story addresses the effects of the pandemic which have damaged this Singaporean family badly after the father loses his job. An unlikely object transforms their lives.

I like that the story highlights the struggle of a real family as the effects of the pandemic are very relevant. For instance, the family had to go through the process of not being able to work due to the restriction of working from home. Another issue that is relevant is the struggle of trying to find a job that is relevant, which is what most people would do and that is something that is well portrayed in the movie. Lastly, I like the part when Ethan's father, Daniel, realizes that he can go to other professions after seeing the prism, which is a symbol of diversity.

The film's location is in Singapore, which is well portrayed. The background music consists of tense music, suspicious music and a lighthearted piece. The tense/suspicious music when his parents are searching for Ethan enhances the story by making it connecting to viewers.

The main character's father, Daniel (Mattew Quek),displays considerable character growth. After he gets laid off from his job he realizes that he can go into different careers after looking at the prism. The main character Ethan (Sherwin Quek), a child with autism, displays curiosity about the prism that becomes the catalyst for change for his father. My favorite part of the film is when Ethan shows his father the prism that leads him to realize that he can try another job that is different from the profession he is used to.

The message is about breaking out of your comfort zone.

I give The Prism 4.5 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 6 to 18, plus adults.

By Tom W., KIDS FIRST!

I enjoyed The Prism as it's a really moving film! The movie starts off with a relatively calm day with Ethan, who is a special kid that is obsessed with a prism that displays seven different colors and it makes him curious. The seven colors are symbols of choices and diversity, which help Ethan's dad realize that he can change his career path.

The story addresses the effects of the pandemic which have damaged this Singaporean family badly after the father loses his job. An unlikely object transforms their lives.

I like that the story highlights the struggle of a real family as the effects of the pandemic are very relevant. For instance, the family had to go through the process of not being able to work due to the restriction of working from home. Another issue that is relevant is the struggle of trying to find a job that is relevant, which is what most people would do and that is something that is well portrayed in the movie. Lastly, I like the part when Ethan's father, Daniel, realizes that he can go to other professions after seeing the prism, which is a symbol of diversity.

The film's location is in Singapore, which is well portrayed. The background music consists of tense music, suspicious music and a lighthearted piece. The tense/suspicious music when his parents are searching for Ethan enhances the story by making it connecting to viewers.

The main character's father, Daniel (Mattew Quek),displays considerable character growth. After he gets laid off from his job he realizes that he can go into different careers after looking at the prism. The main character Ethan (Sherwin Quek), a child with autism, displays curiosity about the prism that becomes the catalyst for change for his father. My favorite part of the film is when Ethan shows his father the prism that leads him to realize that he can try another job that is different from the profession he is used to.

The message is about breaking out of your comfort zone.

I give The Prism 4.5 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 6 to 18, plus adults.

By Tom W., KIDS FIRST!

A Singaporean family downgrades from their luxury condominium to a small public housing apartment due to the father losing his job in the pandemic. In the midst of moving, they discover something special about their 9 year old autistic son. From Singapore.
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