Watch Kids' Reviews of
LOST & FOUND (2022)

What to know:
LOST & FOUND (2022) is in the KIDS FIRST! Film Festival - it may not be a regular, endorsed title
Recommended age 5-18
9 minutes
VIDEO
IOANNA BOLOMYTI
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LOST & FOUND (2022) cover image
I really like the short animated film, Lost & Found. The 2D animation is terrific and the plot is woven in such a way that we almost believe we are understanding what a suitcase thinks about life.

The storyline is about a suitcase that wants to be free. It doesn't like being stuck in a closet and wants freedom.

This is a terrific 2D animated film with great sound effects, a great plot, and great animation. There are parts that made me smile and parts that made me think we should treat our suitcases better. The plot is quite clever in telling a story from a suitcase's point of view. I imagine that a real life suitcase would probably agree with this anthropomorphic suitcase's thoughts and feelings. The short film packs in a lot of content in a few minutes. The animation is very executed and quite detailed -we see the flash of cameras; the characters move their hands as they walk; there's clicking on phones; the characters blink and show expressions with their eyes. I particularly like the planes, because their wings flap like a bird. This is really cute. The various suitcases all have different colors and designs and personalities. The part where they are inside the plane and all we see is their eyes is particularly cute. The security people look just like airport security people. People look like people. There are multiple backgrounds - a closet, a few rooms at the airport, and the sky. The tarmac at the airport as suitcases are rolled away sticks in my mind. The background music and sounds are well-selected, from the chase music, to the shouts of the suitcases chanting for freedom or babbling with each other. Our protagonist suitcase, of course, has the most detailed personality and is easy to relate to, from his adventures to his imaginative travels on his own. There's a special effect where the owner of our protagonist tries to drag it into a closet turns into a monster. You see this through the man's shadow, which is a cool treatment. Written and directed by Vivian Papageorgiou, the whole film is a clever and unusual idea. The sound is definitely my favorite part. The sound design is brilliant, including the use of actual sound clips from airports. Even the sounds used to make the suitcases sound "out of breath" sound real. It is a really smart use of natural sounds. Of course, I have to acknowledge the terrific work of the animators, George Melissaropoulos and Akis Melachris for bringing this story to fruition.

The message I took away from this film is that we need to treat our suitcases better. Also, this film is about freedom. It sort of reminds me of the idea of slavery and how slaves had to go to wherever their masters took them. That they didn't have freedom and had to go wherever and do whatever their masters wanted.

I give Lost & Found 4.5 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 5 to 18, plus adults. Younger people will enjoy it on a simple level and older kids will perhaps take it a bit deeper. Reviewed by Alma K. and Julie S., KIDS FIRST!

I really like the short animated film, Lost & Found. The 2D animation is terrific and the plot is woven in such a way that we almost believe we are understanding what a suitcase thinks about life.

The storyline is about a suitcase that wants to be free. It doesn't like being stuck in a closet and wants freedom.

This is a terrific 2D animated film with great sound effects, a great plot, and great animation. There are parts that made me smile and parts that made me think we should treat our suitcases better. The plot is quite clever in telling a story from a suitcase's point of view. I imagine that a real life suitcase would probably agree with this anthropomorphic suitcase's thoughts and feelings. The short film packs in a lot of content in a few minutes. The animation is very executed and quite detailed -we see the flash of cameras; the characters move their hands as they walk; there's clicking on phones; the characters blink and show expressions with their eyes. I particularly like the planes, because their wings flap like a bird. This is really cute. The various suitcases all have different colors and designs and personalities. The part where they are inside the plane and all we see is their eyes is particularly cute. The security people look just like airport security people. People look like people. There are multiple backgrounds - a closet, a few rooms at the airport, and the sky. The tarmac at the airport as suitcases are rolled away sticks in my mind. The background music and sounds are well-selected, from the chase music, to the shouts of the suitcases chanting for freedom or babbling with each other. Our protagonist suitcase, of course, has the most detailed personality and is easy to relate to, from his adventures to his imaginative travels on his own. There's a special effect where the owner of our protagonist tries to drag it into a closet turns into a monster. You see this through the man's shadow, which is a cool treatment. Written and directed by Vivian Papageorgiou, the whole film is a clever and unusual idea. The sound is definitely my favorite part. The sound design is brilliant, including the use of actual sound clips from airports. Even the sounds used to make the suitcases sound "out of breath" sound real. It is a really smart use of natural sounds. Of course, I have to acknowledge the terrific work of the animators, George Melissaropoulos and Akis Melachris for bringing this story to fruition.

The message I took away from this film is that we need to treat our suitcases better. Also, this film is about freedom. It sort of reminds me of the idea of slavery and how slaves had to go to wherever their masters took them. That they didn't have freedom and had to go wherever and do whatever their masters wanted.

I give Lost & Found 4.5 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 5 to 18, plus adults. Younger people will enjoy it on a simple level and older kids will perhaps take it a bit deeper. Reviewed by Alma K. and Julie S., KIDS FIRST!

A naughty suitcase in an airport that wants to be free.
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