Watch Kids' Reviews of
TASK, THE

What to know:
TASK, THE is in the KIDS FIRST! Film Festival - it may not be a regular, endorsed title
Recommended age 10-18
11 minutes
VIDEO
THOMAS FARM FILMS
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TASK, THE cover image
The Task is a creative and entertaining student film with a new approach to the classic dystopian plot line.

The story follows new task worker (Diego Diaz-Cashatt) who arrives at an unknown location without knowing who he is or what he is doing there. The only things that he knows is what is been provided by the "Voice" that instructs him and other children to conduct useless tasks. However, as the plot thickens, he realizes they may not be as useless; they may be saving his life.

The storyline is engaging. As I followed the main character I was enveloped in the same mystery he was experiencing. While the production quality of the film is quite well done, at times the camerawork is shaky and the lighting could use a little more attention. The camera angles lack variety also. The costumes, particularly for the task workers are bland and lend to making everyone fit in. The locations include an abandoned rural area for the dystopian scenes and another with technological assets, which is rarely seen and provides a hint of where the storyline is going. I was confused by the music initially. It seems very retro and the same melody is played throughout most of the film. Once I got used to the tune it became apparent how much it impacts the storyline, especially when the plot rises to its climax. The main character, who cleverly does not have a name, surprisingly does not develop. At the beginning he is curious and feisty and, towards the end, he is the same. Staffen (Ben Goodman) is just like the main character - initially curious and wanting to explore - and his character does develop. As the credits role I was very surprised to learn that the below-the-lines contributors are the same people that play roles throughout the film. It made the entire film feel more special at its conclusion. My favorite part of the film is when the main character is done with his task and another worker messes it up, which causes a shift in his normal routine and leads to the climax. It was a discovery moment for both him and me. This is a student produced film, with young tweens and teens playing all the characters, including adults and operating most of the equipment. I commend their hard work.

The message of this film is to never be afraid of your curiosity; embrace it and you may make it to the next step.

I give The Task 3.5 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 5 to 15. Reviewed by Ashleigh C. and Julie S., KIDS FIRST!

The Task is a creative and entertaining student film with a new approach to the classic dystopian plot line.

The story follows new task worker (Diego Diaz-Cashatt) who arrives at an unknown location without knowing who he is or what he is doing there. The only things that he knows is what is been provided by the "Voice" that instructs him and other children to conduct useless tasks. However, as the plot thickens, he realizes they may not be as useless; they may be saving his life.

The storyline is engaging. As I followed the main character I was enveloped in the same mystery he was experiencing. While the production quality of the film is quite well done, at times the camerawork is shaky and the lighting could use a little more attention. The camera angles lack variety also. The costumes, particularly for the task workers are bland and lend to making everyone fit in. The locations include an abandoned rural area for the dystopian scenes and another with technological assets, which is rarely seen and provides a hint of where the storyline is going. I was confused by the music initially. It seems very retro and the same melody is played throughout most of the film. Once I got used to the tune it became apparent how much it impacts the storyline, especially when the plot rises to its climax. The main character, who cleverly does not have a name, surprisingly does not develop. At the beginning he is curious and feisty and, towards the end, he is the same. Staffen (Ben Goodman) is just like the main character - initially curious and wanting to explore - and his character does develop. As the credits role I was very surprised to learn that the below-the-lines contributors are the same people that play roles throughout the film. It made the entire film feel more special at its conclusion. My favorite part of the film is when the main character is done with his task and another worker messes it up, which causes a shift in his normal routine and leads to the climax. It was a discovery moment for both him and me. This is a student produced film, with young tweens and teens playing all the characters, including adults and operating most of the equipment. I commend their hard work.

The message of this film is to never be afraid of your curiosity; embrace it and you may make it to the next step.

I give The Task 3.5 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 5 to 15. Reviewed by Ashleigh C. and Julie S., KIDS FIRST!

There are no exceptions. The newest "task-worker" has arrived at the workplace. The task seems useless. He can't remember his past. Will he lay low and obey the rules, or explore to dig up the truth about this place?
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