Watch Kids' Reviews of
SMALL

What to know:
SMALL is in the KIDS FIRST! Film Festival - it may not be a regular, endorsed title
Recommended age 10-18
10 minutes
VIDEO
JONATHAN PAYNE
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SMALL cover image
Small is a lovely short film which allows the viewer to have a slight insight into a moment in a child's life. The viewer has to use their imagination which means that it will a different meaning to each viewer.

The storyline follows a child finding a way to protect a miniature forest village in a storm.

I like the way you are led through the story, which allows you to meet the characters and determine who they are for yourself. The story has two parallel contexts - one in which we see the boy's concern for the tiny village and one in which the boy's concern is for his father. This helps the viewer get a grasp on what the boy may be thinking or the reason for his actions.

The filming is very well done - nice and clear inside or outside shots. The close-ups of the tiny village give the impression that there may be more behind the little houses or boats than we can see. The outside shots define the context of the location nicely along with the weather, which is central to the story. The locations of the lovely forest, the water and the secure house all help define the context for the viewer. We see the wet and damp forest and the warmth and security inside the house. The background music and sound effects help build intrigue and the sense of adventure alongside triumph and danger. The little boats and miniature houses are really well done - not too overly intricate, but just the right level to allow the viewer to decide if they think little people are part of this story or not. The main character is the boy Toby (Izyan MacIntyre) who plays the role very well - showing the concerns and thoughts of his character as we move through the story. Whoever built the little props for the boats and houses is to be commended; they were so intriguing and cleverly created. My favorite shot is the final view of the little houses, with one slightly damaged by the storm. You can decide if there are little people living within and, if so, will they be able to fix the damage, the final outcome is yours to decide.

The message of the film is to think of others and see where you can help. Note that it does show kids doing risky things that kids might imitate. The boy does go into the woods without telling his guardians but this is entirely within the realms of the story because he knows about the little houses existing in the woods next to his home. There is also acknowledgment of death with a dead bird shown and mentioned in a news story.

I give Small 4 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 10 to 18, plus adults. I like the way one gets a story with the opportunity to expand that story with your own imagination. By Richard L., KIDS FIRST!

Small is a lovely short film which allows the viewer to have a slight insight into a moment in a child's life. The viewer has to use their imagination which means that it will a different meaning to each viewer.

The storyline follows a child finding a way to protect a miniature forest village in a storm.

I like the way you are led through the story, which allows you to meet the characters and determine who they are for yourself. The story has two parallel contexts - one in which we see the boy's concern for the tiny village and one in which the boy's concern is for his father. This helps the viewer get a grasp on what the boy may be thinking or the reason for his actions.

The filming is very well done - nice and clear inside or outside shots. The close-ups of the tiny village give the impression that there may be more behind the little houses or boats than we can see. The outside shots define the context of the location nicely along with the weather, which is central to the story. The locations of the lovely forest, the water and the secure house all help define the context for the viewer. We see the wet and damp forest and the warmth and security inside the house. The background music and sound effects help build intrigue and the sense of adventure alongside triumph and danger. The little boats and miniature houses are really well done - not too overly intricate, but just the right level to allow the viewer to decide if they think little people are part of this story or not. The main character is the boy Toby (Izyan MacIntyre) who plays the role very well - showing the concerns and thoughts of his character as we move through the story. Whoever built the little props for the boats and houses is to be commended; they were so intriguing and cleverly created. My favorite shot is the final view of the little houses, with one slightly damaged by the storm. You can decide if there are little people living within and, if so, will they be able to fix the damage, the final outcome is yours to decide.

The message of the film is to think of others and see where you can help. Note that it does show kids doing risky things that kids might imitate. The boy does go into the woods without telling his guardians but this is entirely within the realms of the story because he knows about the little houses existing in the woods next to his home. There is also acknowledgment of death with a dead bird shown and mentioned in a news story.

I give Small 4 out of 5 stars and recommend it for ages 10 to 18, plus adults. I like the way one gets a story with the opportunity to expand that story with your own imagination. By Richard L., KIDS FIRST!

Deep in the forest, a shy, young boy comes across a mysterious village composed of buildings no larger than the size of his hands. As a storm fast approaches, the village is vulnerable and he must find a way to protect it.
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